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  1. #1
    New Member Firedog's Avatar
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    1st Try at DIY Underquilt Questions

    History, I have been sewing on occasion for years but never nothing as thin as rip stop. I bought some 1.9 & 1.1. I have enough of each to make an underquilt.

    I was thinking using the 1.1 on the inner cover, on the center layer, & baffles. And using the 1.9 on the outer cover. I have the IX pattern and I was going to put a HH slit in the lower half.
    Questions:
    1. What is your opinion on the choice of fabrics and their placement.
    2. I tried with some trimmings to sew the ripstop. I'm having a problem with the fabric gathering while using a wide zigzag stitch. I was zigzaging the edges of the slits to aid in raveling till I get the velcro and piping attached. Straight stiches seems to be fine if not too long.
    3. thread & needle requirements

    Thanks in advance, Carl W.

  2. #2
    PuckerFactor's Avatar
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    I'm not sure what kind of underquilt you're making. You mention a center layer?? baffles, which are for down, and Insultex.
    1. 1.1 would be good for your inner layer, and the baffles. Most people use bugnetting, or tulle/organza for the baffles, but 1.1 will work fine. 1.9 is probably overkill for the outer shell, but it will make it more durable.
    Are you making a down UQ? If not, there's no need for baffles.
    2. Why not just singe the edge with a lighter? You're not alone though. 1.1 especially scrunches a lot with zig-zag. If you singe the edges, that'll definitely keep things in place until you can get the finishing bits on.
    One thing that I was shown recently, is to keep tension on the fabric from behind and in front, and then let the feed dogs advance things. It revolutionized my sewing. Things suddenly stopped advancing unevenly, bunching up, and generally being unruly. I went from having to use 15-20 stitches/in. to being able to fly along with 10-12 stitches/in.
    3. Most of us use Gutterman's 100% polyester thread. As long as it's quality thread, and not cotton/natural fiber, you're probably good to go. I usually use size 12 or 14 needles.

    Best of luck with the quilt!
    PF
    It's better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

    Formerly known as Acercanto, my trail name is MacGuyver to some, and Pucker Factor to others.

    It's not procrastinating, its proactively delaying the implementation of the energy-intensive phase of the project until the enthusiasm factor is at its maximum effectiveness. - Randy Glasbergen

  3. #3
    New Member Firedog's Avatar
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    Thanks PF, sorry for not being clear. I am making a down underquilt. I looked at the pattern for the IX and understood it to show 3 layers. Does it need to be 3 layers or just and inner shell and outer? I was going to make the baffles about 2 inches and put them 4 inches apart. I like the JRB design with the chambers running side to side ei linear.
    Thanks for the singe advice, I didn't think about that. I have to have a lot of warmth. The older I get, the colder I get. If I had the $ I would get the JRB 4 season full lenght upper & under. So I thought I'd try the under first. It will probably take a few tries. That's why I bought the extra fabric.

  4. #4
    PuckerFactor's Avatar
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    For a down UQ, you just need an inner and outer shell, with the baffles going between.
    Most people make the baffles run the length of the quilt (head to toe). This makes it easy to make the outer shell larger to accommodate the curve of the hammock without compressing the down. It's called a "differentially cut" UQ.
    For example, if you're going to use baffles 4" apart, then the inner shell would have the baffles sewn down every 4", and the outer shell would have the baffles attached every 4.5".
    Most of the DIY UQs I've seen use 6" and 7" on the inside and outside, respectively.
    Also, don't forget to add length to the outer shell to account for the 2" of loft you want.

    PF
    It's better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

    Formerly known as Acercanto, my trail name is MacGuyver to some, and Pucker Factor to others.

    It's not procrastinating, its proactively delaying the implementation of the energy-intensive phase of the project until the enthusiasm factor is at its maximum effectiveness. - Randy Glasbergen

  5. #5
    Senior Member JohnSawyer's Avatar
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    I see no reason to use the heavier fabric as an outer shell, unless that's all you have... most are 1.1 all the way around, no-see-um netting as baffles.

    If you're going to use IX, I'd make a Down UQ, and then an add-on IX cover for really cold nights...

    (not that I've done this, though..)
    "Do or do not, there is no try." -- Yoda


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