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  1. #21
    dakotaross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Law Dawg View Post
    ...I do know from actual eye ball experience that more than shock is a concern. Trees can split and explode when struck...
    Yeah, I would think the risk of getting pummeled by debris after a strike is a lot more likely.

    Quote Originally Posted by thomas533 View Post
    ...it is unlikely that any electrical current will pass through you because you are not the most direct path to ground... unless your treehuggers, woopies and nylon hammock are all soaked...
    Hmmm... plastic coated dutch clips?

  2. #22
    Senior Member genegene's Avatar
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    OK so I called a buddy of mine who is an electrician and asked him about this scenario.

    His thoughts on the matter are this,

    1) You will probably safer in a hammock then a tent as you will not be as close to conductive materials.

    2) You will have more problems from:

    a) the falling and hitting something on the ground when your line breaks,
    b) shrapnel from the tree,
    c) concussion wave,
    d) blindness from the flash (if you are awake with your eyes open)
    e) If you are OK from all the above your next major problem is that you will need to change your pants because it just got scared out of you, and it wont be fun explaining that to all your friends if you know what I mean.

    In the tent, if you live you will still have to worry about b, c, d, and e.

    3) The test i had in mind will not work. He suggests attaching a hammock to a old fire tower, cell tower, or something like that and attach it on the ground wire side (wrap your sling around the wire). Place a tent right next to it as well and have a stake right next to the wire.
    Place a dummy in each one and and some how be able to record the amount of current that enters the dummy. Since he knows of no device that can still work after a lightning strike I thought about placing water bladders or a dye pouch in side them that will explode if a current comes in contact with it.

    Other then that he thinks that you are just ever so slightly more likely able to survive being an a hammock then in a tent.

    He also said dont hook to the tallest tree or be on the tallest part of a Mt. or hill during the storm.

  3. #23
    Senior Member fred1diver's Avatar
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    yaeh, personally I think that since your off the ground, hence not grounded, your not closing the circuit, you should be fine (don't sue if you get zapped ) but on the other hand I've seen a tree snap in two when it got hit by a lightning bolt (before catching on fire), so I'm not sure what conclusion to really make, in a way your safer but in another your not
    someone call mythbusters and have them find out
    that would be too cool to see!

  4. #24
    Senior Member genegene's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fred1diver View Post
    someone call mythbusters and have them find out
    that would be too cool to see!
    I'll post that on there website and see what others think

  5. #25
    canoebie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by genegene View Post
    e) If you are OK from all the above your next major problem is that you will need to change your pants because it just got scared out of you, and it wont be fun explaining that to all your friends if you know what I mean.
    Yet another good reason to have a camo hammock.
    Revolution is about the need to re-evolve political, economic and social justice and power back into the hands of the people, preferably through legislation and policies that make human sense. That's what revolution is about. Revolution is not about shootouts.

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  6. #26
    Senior Member Beast 71's Avatar
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    Don't count on "regular" rules about electricity to apply to lightning, it's so powerful it wil do what it wants. But, I imagine that being dry in a hammock would be better than lying on wet ground, but that's true even if your not struck by lightning!
    "In your face space coyote"-HJS

  7. #27
    aboyd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buffalo Skipper View Post
    I was at a cub scout campout several years ago, with, oh 500 campers at a local scout camp. Before dawn on Saturday, a line of spring storms rolled through. I was up early to shower and as I emerged I ran into a friend and we chatted in the covered doorway while we waited for the storm to pass. We saw and heard a bolt of lightning strike about 200 yards away. Scared the %&*#@ out of us! It was later learned that this bolt of lightning struck inside one of the campsites, and struck a father in his tent. Investigation showed that the lightning had struck the tree, traveled through the root and with a lot of wet under the tent, came up through the floor struck him in the head. His son was not touched. But the man's memory was affected and he was taken to the hospital by around lunch when those around him figured out what had happened.

    It is unlikely he was hit with the full effect of this, but he obviously got a reasonable jolt. Lightning is unpredictable. Yes we can take precautions, but there is no way to completely remove the risk, whether you are in the wilderness or in your home...
    Wow, that is scary!!
    "I will study and get ready, and perhaps my chance will come." - Abraham Lincoln

  8. #28
    Senior Member Buffalo Skipper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beast 71 View Post
    Don't count on "regular" rules about electricity to apply to lightning, it's so powerful it wil do what it wants.
    I am all about this statement! Think about it. H2O is in reality a very POOR conductor of electricity (look it up). But given that much amperage, it will follow the path of least resistance, and water is better than most of what is around it...
    “Indian builds small fire and stays warm, white man builds big fire and stays warm collecting firewood”—unknown

    “The cure for anything is salt water - sweat, tears, or the sea”—Karen Blixen

  9. #29
    obxh2o's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by genegene View Post
    Place a dummy in each one and and some how be able to record the amount of current that enters the dummy.
    If you are looking for volunteers, I'm busy.
    "I go because it irons out the wrinkles in my soul." -- Sigurd Olson

  10. #30
    Senior Member Trooper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canoebie View Post
    Covering your ears is important if strikes are really close.
    Canoebie,

    I think your advice based on your research is exellcent, but I think covering one's ears isn't practical.

    By the time you realize you need to cover your ears, it will be too late. But, if you have hearing protection for fellow campers who snore, using them during a thunderstorm would be prudent.

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