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  1. #1
    Roadrunnr72's Avatar
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    Ridgeline tightness

    I have a gathered end hammock that I added a ridgeline to it. I have not used one before. How tight is your suspension before you get in? Is it strung tight, or does it have some "sag" to it?
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  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    I am assuming you mean a structural ridge line, a RL meant to control sag of the hammock hang, repeatable with every hang. And not a ridge line just used to hang stuff on, a storage pouch , lamp etc.

    The initial suspension or hang of the hammock should not be tight. Hang the hammock and get in. The general rule of thumb is to pinch the ridge line between thumb and forefinger and twist your wrist like turning your ignition key in the car. If you can twist a slight S-curve in the ridge line with moderate effort then the tightness of the suspension is correct. If the ridge line hangs loose the suspension is too loose. If the ridge line twangs like the bass string of a cello then the suspension is too tight.

    All that being said you may have to experiment a little with the ridge line length to get it to provide the hammock sag that works for you and for the hammock you are using. I believe the general thumb rule is for the ridge line to be 80% of the length of hammock when laid flat. Start there then adjust a little shorter or longer to get the length that works best.

    Another way to look at this is that the length of the ridge line you have installed is going to control the minimum sag of the hammock when the suspension is set to correct tightness. If the suspension is very loose then of course the sag will increase and be greater than sag the properly tensioned ridge line was intended to achieve.

    The process I described above is really just to determine if you have set the proper tightness of the suspension that will provide the sag the ridge line is designed to provide. The two interact to certain extent. Set the suspension to loose and the sag is more than you want. Tighten the suspension till you start pulling the trees over and the sag will not be less than what the length of the ridge line permits.

  3. #3
    sturgeon's Avatar
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    If you watch the Warbonnet video on his site where he demonstrates the set-up of the WBBB, he shows what (for him, for that hammock) is a good way to check the ridgeline tautness.
    I keep mine a wee bit tighter, but it's a starting point anyway.

  4. #4
    in it for the naps oldgringo's Avatar
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    If you set up on trees that are farther apart than you'd like and are unable to get your suspension high enough, the rl will be correcting for that, and will be tighter.
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  5. #5
    flatline's Avatar
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    right out of the bag, my WBBB was a comfortable hang. but i decided to experiment a little with the ridge line. i thought if i shortened it a little the extra sag might flatten things out somewhat. i tied a slippery half hitch near the head end and slid a small biner clip into the loop to attach a pillow/stuff sack. took a short lay down to check placement and lay, it seemed to be slightly flatter so i did the same to the foot end and viola, more comfort and 2 attachment points to boot.
    i might put a long continuous loop of masons twine to use as a movable line to slide stuff toward the foot end and then retrieve them when needed. maybe?

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  6. #6
    Bubba's Avatar
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    I used to use the SRL as a measuring tool so I could set up with consistency. I used to have mine taut but not tight. Certainly if you have less than ideal anchor point i.e. less than 30 degree suspension the SRL will compensate and provide you with the lay you are accustomed to although it will be under a lot more tension the flatter your suspension.
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