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  1. #1
    New Member lbdgolfer's Avatar
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    What temp do you use a Under quilt?

    I went camping this past weekend with our scouts and there were 3 of us hanging. The low on Saturday morning was 19 with no wind. I was using a blue pad and a 0 degree bag and I was completely warm. I have been thinking about getting a under quilt for my HH Expedition. Now I am wondering if it would be worth it. I live in Northwest GA so that is about as cold as we get.

    So my question would be, when would you need or use a under quilt? I don't want to buy one if I can get by with what I've got.

    We were car camping but the pad rolls up nicely and would still pack well for hiking.

    Thanks
    Lewis

  2. #2
    Banned
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    sounds like you've answered your own question! you hit a temperature that you don't expect to get much colder than, slept warm and comfortably. to me that says "i'm good"

    -recommendation... no

  3. #3
    MedicineMan's Avatar
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    Below 70f.
    55-70 Te-wa summer uq or Leighs summer uq
    40-55 Warbonnet 3sYeti or Snugfit or Stormcrow
    30-40 Warbonnet Winter Yeti or Te-wa Winter Coat or JRB
    MW4
    20-30 Combos like a JRB Nest and one of the above
    10-20 PeaPod and one of the above
    0-20 Peapod and WallCreeper 20
    Never gone below 0 but would the above and add down pants and down parka.
    I sleep very cold, if I get cold its a challenge to rewarm. The above choices are idea but in some situations I've pushed to lower temps by using hammock socks and/or taking my tarp to ground. My scale is very conservative for me..example, I've used the Warbonnet 3sYeti to 32F many nights in a row while crossing NY and NJ on the AT.

  4. #4
    Señor Member wisenber's Avatar
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    While I prefer the comfort of a down quilt, if I could be warm and comfortable with just a blue pad and a sleeping bag, I'd stop and count my blessings.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Veto 65's Avatar
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    The fact that there was no wind might be a key factor also. Don't rule out no UQ untill you know for sure. Maybe all you need is some sort of puncho under your hammock to stop the wind (under poncho), that would be a light solution.
    I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority. - E. B. White (1899 - 1985)

  6. #6
    New Member mayday's Avatar
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    Hey Wisenber...sorry I did not get to say "Se ya" on Roan Mtn. So....SEE YA!

  7. #7
    New Member mayday's Avatar
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    lbdgolfer---

    I am a SM at Troop 800 in Maryville, TN. I just returned from the Northern Tier High Adventure Base. BSA describes "cold weather camping" as any overnight camping when the temp is 49 or below. At Okpik they taught us that between 32 and 50 is usually "wet cold", between 20 and 32 is "marginal dry cold" and between 20 and zero is "dry cold" and below zero is "arctic cold". The reason I say all that is you have to know on top of the temperature, what type of moisture you have to deal with. If you are in a hammock at 45 degrees, it can be both cold and rainy. At 25 can be cold and a wet snow. At -5 can be dry snow and cold. That helps you to know what type and how much insulation you might need.

    I use a pad even up to the lows of 60 degrees! Just because in a breathable hammock there will be an exchange of air and with a slight breeze you can get chilled. I use a Ridgerest by the way.

    Now in Minnesota in January this year, I used only two Ridgerest pads in my hammock. I also used a pea-pod method as well (threading the hammock through your sleeping bag out both the head and foot of the bag). I was toasty warm (and a little clammy) at MINUS 24.

    So, your question is a good one and has lots of answers!

    YIS!

    Jeff

  8. #8
    Senior Member Slo's Avatar
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    for frame of reference, my brother and I were takin' a siesta from splitting wood at it was about 67-70 degrees out in the sun and after layin' there for about 15 minutes he was surprised he was actually getting a little chilled and had to put his shirt back on.. now imagine at night..
    "I ain't here for a long time, I'm here for a good time"

    - George Strait

  9. #9
    kayak karl's Avatar
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    75-35 JRB nest
    35-0 JRB mt. wash 4 or tewa winter coat.
    It's not procrastinating, its proactively delaying the implementation of the energy-intensive phase of the project until the enthusiasm factor is at its maximum effectiveness.

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