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Thread: Help Me decide!

  1. #1
    Senior Member RWillieK's Avatar
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    Help Me decide!

    I can't decide between two tarps from OES -

    I'm looking at either the smaller 4 season tarp or MacCat standard (I think either in black). It will be covering an HH Exlporer.

    I don't really camp during the winter (less than freezing), and spend most of my time in the woods backpacking (not much car camping).

    Which of the two would you get and why?

    Robbie
    Just another Ham in a Hammock....

  2. #2
    bugman0914's Avatar
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    Well I would go with the Standard probably but the four season offers you more protection from elements like driving rain, wind, etc.
    Tony a.k.a. bugman0914

  3. #3
    2Questions's Avatar
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    Tarp size isn't as much of an issue in winter...snow. Its rain and wind that make the choice for me. I went with an OES Deluxe and added doors to it. I've been through some rough weather and the doors are the key. Even a huge 14' ridge tarp without doors wouldn't have helped.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member exup's Avatar
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    I have a superfly and a standard on the way. I don't see how you could go wrong with a 4 season tarp that will work in all situatuions at only a 10ish oz difference.

    I will probably use the standard for most situations, but knowing there's going to be a windy rainy trip it'll be worth carrying the few extra ounces for reassurment. Plus, its easier to make the bigger investment first then buy the less costly things later. I'd go 4 season.

    Something to keep in mind I didn't think of, last weekend first time having the 21oz superfly out (which worked wonderfully) ended up weighing atleast twice the amount after packing it up soaking wet. Spinn may come in handy as I believe it won't hold any water at all.

  5. #5
    Oms's Avatar
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    There is a really big difference between a 4 season and a standard MacCat. When setting up the standard it would have to be perfectly centered in order to cover both ends. Sometimes that can be a real pain having to make adjustments over and over. If you wish to change the lay of the hammock, yet another adjustment will have to be made. In foul weather the tarp will have to be hung very close to the hammock to get full coverage. Getting in and out when the tarp is wet your back rubs against it. Now you have a wet back. There is also a greater risk of getting a low hanging under quilt wet. Now step it up a little to a Deluxe or Ultra and the longer ridge line allows the tarp to be hung a little higher. If set up proper, the larger MacCats are more forgiving. A lot of this depends on where and when you go camping and how good your skills are. Some folks get by on a postage stamp for a tarp, but it usually takes a lot of skill. The other option is to go for a rectangular tarp for a couple of reasons. The ends can be pulled in like doors and if it's raining it can be lifted up like a big awning and give lots of coverage to cook, hang out or pack up. All that said, I have a MacCat for Summer, a 8x10 for rainy forecast cool weather, and now I'm waiting on a 10x10 spinn cat cut for Winter. Spinn will stay much dryer from both rain and condensation and weigh less, since that is what you wanted for backpacking. Unfortunately it cost more as well. Brian makes awesome tarps, so whatever you get will be nice.

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