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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by skskinner View Post
    I have seen cross sections of sleeping bags years ago that were sewn thru BUT two layers, the seams staggered so that where you have the most loft in one layer of sewn thru construction you have the seam of the other one sewn through. Using 1.1 oz fabric, that would only add about six ounces max to the overall weight,
    NOW FOR THE GOOD PART: If you made two quilts and staggered the seams in this manner, ( Start the say 6 " seams on one at 6 inches and start the 6 inch seams on the other at 3 inches)you could NOT sew the two together, rather, VELCRO the outside edges together to make a summer/winter Quilt, of two summer quilts. That is the way I am going to make mine when I make my quilt.
    Mule

    That's a pretty goot idea. For awhile I was toyin with a similar idea of making a 2 or 3 inch thick quick that was really narrow to add to my UQ in the winter. Zelcro would probibly work better.

    I'm trying hard now to make all of my gear work for as many different ways and temps I can. I am more inclined to use a thick UQ yearround underneath. Depending on the temps I can be fine all night with that and nothing overtop. Or I can hang the UQ lower if I am too warm.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  2. #12
    Mule's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hammock engineer View Post
    That's a pretty goot idea. For awhile I was toyin with a similar idea of making a 2 or 3 inch thick quick that was really narrow to add to my UQ in the winter. Zelcro would probibly work better.

    I'm trying hard now to make all of my gear work for as many different ways and temps I can. I am more inclined to use a thick UQ yearround underneath. Depending on the temps I can be fine all night with that and nothing overtop. Or I can hang the UQ lower if I am too warm.
    Another thing I plan to do is use my hammock SOCK for summer use. Since I have a double bottom Claytor I don't really need it for mosquito protection, but my sons will use their socks for mosquito protection in hot weather. I am also probably going to use an underquilt most of the time even in summer because it can get down in the 60's at night. The good thing about down insulation is it's wide comfort range.
    There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and the enemy. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion.
    Gen. William Thornson, U.S. Army

  3. #13
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    Sounds like a good idea. A little extra weight for the extra shell material, but it should greatly decrease any sew thru heat loss and you end up with 2 quilts. Cool.

    But again, really, how much dif does it really make if you sew thru? I guess the manufacturers know, but not a lot if you go buy the specs at WM. And again, I'm guessing that most of the benefit is in real world use ( rather than a lab rating) where controlling the down's movement as you thrash around in your sleep, might end up being more important than the loss of loft on the seam line. But I'm just guessing.

    Speaking of seam lines, you would think I would freeze in the PeaPod top wise. There is no draft tube over the top Velcro closure. And you can clearly see that there is about a 1/4" space above you, the whole length of the bag, with little or no down. Nothing but nylon and Velcro is over you. None the less, if you close it down from, say, a 6" opening to a 2" opening, you can tell a large dif. And if you close it down all the way, you can tell ( quickly) an even larger dif. Even though you would think a lot of body heat would still be escaping along that wide seam line, which is huge compared to any sewn thru bag. I was afraid that would be a major draw back top wise, i had even thought about DIYing my own draft tube. But I can't say it has been much of a drawback that I can tell. Not enough to bother with.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    Sounds like a good idea. A little extra weight for the extra shell material, but it should greatly decrease any sew thru heat loss and you end up with 2 quilts. Cool.

    But again, really, how much dif does it really make if you sew thru? I guess the manufacturers know, but not a lot if you go buy the specs at WM. And again, I'm guessing that most of the benefit is in real world use ( rather than a lab rating) where controlling the down's movement as you thrash around in your sleep, might end up being more important than the loss of loft on the seam line. But I'm just guessing.

    Speaking of seam lines, you would think I would freeze in the PeaPod top wise. There is no draft tube over the top Velcro closure. And you can clearly see that there is about a 1/4" space above you, the whole length of the bag, with little or no down. Nothing but nylon and Velcro is over you. None the less, if you close it down from, say, a 6" opening to a 2" opening, you can tell a large dif. And if you close it down all the way, you can tell ( quickly) an even larger dif. Even though you would think a lot of body heat would still be escaping along that wide seam line, which is huge compared to any sewn thru bag. I was afraid that would be a major draw back top wise, i had even thought about DIYing my own draft tube. But I can't say it has been much of a drawback that I can tell. Not enough to bother with.
    Man you guys are reading my mind. I was using a sleeping bag on the ground for the last part of my hike. I noticed a huge difference with the draft collar vs not using, even with wearing a hat. I was wondering about incorporating it into my hammock. I was thinking about trying something with the down jacket that I carry anyways, plus I already use it as a pillow.

    Search on whiteblaze for Gardenville under pictures. I saw on the front page a pic of min making a draft collar for a hammock out of a DAM.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by skskinner View Post
    Another thing I plan to do is use my hammock SOCK for summer use. Since I have a double bottom Claytor I don't really need it for mosquito protection, but my sons will use their socks for mosquito protection in hot weather. I am also probably going to use an underquilt most of the time even in summer because it can get down in the 60's at night. The good thing about down insulation is it's wide comfort range.
    I like the sock design and closure. It seems easier than a zipper. I am thinking about making a half ripstop and a half netting one for summer use. That way you could put whatever on top depending on the weather.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  6. #16
    Mule's Avatar
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    That's a great idea.
    There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and the enemy. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion.
    Gen. William Thornson, U.S. Army

  7. #17
    slowhike's Avatar
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    just to reduce confusion, in earlier posts HC4U & hammockengineer were talking about how big to make the baffles (8 or 10").
    i think they were talking about "chambers".
    the baffles would be referring to the netting that separates the chambers. right?
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  8. #18
    slowhike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hammock engineer View Post
    Man you guys are reading my mind. I was using a sleeping bag on the ground for the last part of my hike. I noticed a huge difference with the draft collar vs not using, even with wearing a hat. I was wondering about incorporating it into my hammock. I was thinking about trying something with the down jacket that I carry anyways, plus I already use it as a pillow.

    Search on whiteblaze for Gardenville under pictures. I saw on the front page a pic of min making a draft collar for a hammock out of a DAM.
    i've been trying to tell you guys how worth while collars are (read baffles) are for a while now
    worth their weight in gold<g>.
    http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery...5/PB120145.JPG
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowhike View Post
    just to reduce confusion, in earlier posts HC4U & hammockengineer were talking about how big to make the baffles (8 or 10").
    i think they were talking about "chambers".
    the baffles would be referring to the netting that separates the chambers. right?
    I bought up the spacing in my first post and he chimed in that he was evenally spacing them.

    I think from there it was on the baffles themselves.

    You bring up a good point. Maybe we should start reffering to the baffles as the material/walls connecting the top and bottom seperating the down, and chambers reffering to the area the down is in.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  10. #20
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hammock engineer View Post
    I bought up the spacing in my first post and he chimed in that he was evenally spacing them.

    I think from there it was on the baffles themselves.

    You bring up a good point. Maybe we should start reffering to the baffles as the material/walls connecting the top and bottom seperating the down, and chambers reffering to the area the down is in.
    That would avoid a lot of confusion.
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it." -Terry Pratchett



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