Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Senior Member grampa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.0 Dbl
    Tarp
    MLD Cuben
    Insulation
    Hammock Gear UQ/TQ
    Suspension
    Whoopies
    Posts
    174

    Single Tarp Ridgeline: Above or Below?

    When rigging a single tarp ridgeline, what are the arguments/advantages to placing it above the tarp? Below the tarp?

    An inquiring newbie wants to know!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    248
    The argument for below the tarp is extra support for heavy snow, etc. and a place to hang stuff. The argument for above the tarp is less wear on the material, somewhat easier to setup.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    UK
    Hammock
    Warbonnet Blackbird
    Tarp
    Warbonnet Superfly
    Insulation
    HGWinter Incubator
    Suspension
    stock straps
    Posts
    205
    Images
    1
    Ridgeline below tarp - gives you a better weatherproof structure, less stress on the end tie outs than over the top where all the stress is on the ties. when its under the stress is minimal and is only lateral. If you use a smooth line there is minimal/no wear on the material.

    I do want to try warbonnet guys method of two different cords, one for each tie out and no full ridgeline but in the UK its always windy and I feel more secure with the tar over the top of the ridge. I so always use drip strings though just inside the tarp in case rain migrates down the ridgeline.

  4. #4
    Senior Member pig.slayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Maitland, NSW, Australia
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.0 Dbl & DIY 1.5 Gathered End
    Tarp
    HG 4S Cuben Baby !
    Insulation
    Phoenix's&Burrow's
    Suspension
    Dynaglide Whoopies
    Posts
    265
    Images
    23
    I've tried both ways, For my Spinn tarps I prefer the ridgeline under the tarp.
    Personal preference I guess and I get a tighter pitch but that might be my method's,,,,,,,,
    I am a GEAR JUNKIE and GRAM COUNTER !!

    There, It's out. I said it, Ahh I feel better now

  5. #5
    pizza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    MN
    Hammock
    Lite Owl, WBBB XLC
    Tarp
    HG Cuben, Superfly
    Insulation
    Incubator/Burrow
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    1,638
    I like above the tarp ridgelines. I've never had any issues with stability in high winds or light snow but can see where under the tarp would be better for heavy snow.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by NickJ View Post
    I do want to try warbonnet guys method of two different cords, one for each tie out and no full ridgeline but in the UK its always windy and I feel more secure with the tar over the top of the ridge. I so always use drip strings though just inside the tarp in case rain migrates down the ridgeline.

    my tarps in particular (don't know of anybody else who does it this way) have edge binding on the ridge seam, that edge binding is very strong (i've stood on a strand of it hung like a jumprope and bounced without it breaking, i'm 160#), it's all the additional support you'd ever need. the main problam i have with a seperate ridge cord and prussics is that if you pitch the tarp tight enough the pussics will slip, aprox 40-50# which isn't that much.

    i always tell people using my tarps that over is better than under. i've heard of one instance of someone using a seperate ridge cord "under", and for whatever reason the ridgeline seam of the tarp was slightly looser than the cord under it (because of the prussics i assume), so when the wind blew there was enough slack that the seperate ridgeline rode higher than the ridge seam (while the wind was pushing on things). basically the seperate ridge cord and tarp ridge seam were not lined up, so the seam was not at the apex of the ridge like it's supposed to be. this allowed water run "under" the edge binding and to come through the RL seam since it was not the highest point. that would't happen if the RL seam was taking all the tension like it was designed to do. i've set my tarps up tighter than anyone ever will in the field, they don't need any extra support and pitch best when the seam is under plenty of tension.

    i don't mean you need to crank down on the RL guylines, but when you tighten the ground corners, it should fully tighten up the ridge seam, and having a seperate ridge cord (especially under) can prevent that.

    keep in mind this is just what i've experienced using "my" tarps with the built-in ridge support
    Last edited by warbonnetguy; 03-14-2011 at 11:36.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by pizza View Post
    I like above the tarp ridgelines. I've never had any issues with stability in high winds or light snow but can see where under the tarp would be better for heavy snow.
    snow isn't going to collect on top of the tarp in enough quantity to apply more than a few lbs of extra tension, a good wind gust would probably push harder.

    as far as i know nobody has ever had a tieout fail due to snow or wind loading (guylines have broken yes, but i've yet to hear of an actual tieout failing)

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    UK
    Hammock
    Warbonnet Blackbird
    Tarp
    Warbonnet Superfly
    Insulation
    HGWinter Incubator
    Suspension
    stock straps
    Posts
    205
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by warbonnetguy View Post
    my tarps in particular (don't know of anybody else who does it this way) have edge binding on the ridge seam, that edge binding is very strong (i've stood on a strand of it hung like a jumprope and bounced without it breaking, i'm 160#), it's all the additional support you'd ever need. the main problam i have with a seperate ridge cord and prussics is that if you pitch the tarp tight enough the pussics will slip, aprox 40-50# which isn't that much.

    i always tell people using my tarps that over is better than under. i've heard of one instance of someone using a seperate ridge cord "under", and for whatever reason the ridgeline seam of the tarp was slightly looser than the cord under it (because of the prussics i assume), so when the wind blew there was enough slack that the seperate ridgeline rode higher than the ridge seam (while the wind was pushing on things). basically the seperate ridge cord and tarp ridge seam were not lined up, so the seam was not at the apex of the ridge like it's supposed to be. this allowed water run "under" the edge binding and to come through the RL seam since it was not the highest point. that would't happen if the RL seam was taking all the tension like it was designed to do. i've set my tarps up tighter than anyone ever will in the field, they don't need any extra support and pitch best when the seam is under plenty of tension.

    i don't mean you need to crank down on the RL guylines, but when you tighten the ground corners, it should fully tighten up the ridge seam, and having a seperate ridge cord (especially under) can prevent that.

    keep in mind this is just what i've experienced using "my" tarps with the built-in ridge support
    Yep will definitely try it next time.

    I've never had problems with slipping prussics (actually I mean klemheists but I always say prussic).

    What type of seam do you use for the ridge seam? I just looked at my superfly again and its incredibly neat but I cant work out what kind of join it is with the edge binding in place.

  9. #9
    Senior Member grampa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.0 Dbl
    Tarp
    MLD Cuben
    Insulation
    Hammock Gear UQ/TQ
    Suspension
    Whoopies
    Posts
    174
    Brandon, do you run the seam on your tarps on top or underneath?

  10. #10
    Member zyhano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    netherlands
    Hammock
    dd frontline
    Tarp
    fox tarp
    Insulation
    thermarest prolite
    Suspension
    rings and webbing
    Posts
    98
    I use a fox tarp. It has a webbing reinforced line and two loops at each end. One loop for the line connecting to the tree, another one for a mosquito net or ridgeline.

    So I don't need a continuous ridgeline, drip strings etc. the ridgeline I use is underneath because of the construction of the tarp.

    On another tarp I've used a ridgeline both over and under, but I definitely prefer under.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •