View Poll Results: SS vs. Down Underquilts

Voters
38. You may not vote on this poll
  • never used a SS, but I think a down UQ would be far superior

    20 52.63%
  • Used both, and the down UQ is clearly superior

    8 21.05%
  • Used both, and the SS is a good alternative

    7 18.42%
  • Used both, and have found the SS superior in some situations

    1 2.63%
  • I think the SS gives more bang for the buck than down UQs

    3 7.89%
  • Have not really used a SS, but I just don't feel that pad/SB would be warm to even 45* or higher.

    1 2.63%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 41

Thread: SS vs. down UQs

  1. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,557
    Quote Originally Posted by Lost View Post
    I have a SS I used at 17 degrees. Lots on insulation in there - the stock pads, a Z pad and insulbrite fabric. Stayed nice and warm, but I definitely needed all of it. (wind chill around zero). Lot of bult to carry. One of my sons used his Potomac, the other used my Speer Snugfit. Both were very comfortable, and didn't have nearly the bulk to carry that I did. My vote would be for the UQ - less stuff to carry!
    Hog On Ice at WB uses blue pads, several of them, and he uses a Moonbow Gearskin to carry the bulk of the pads, they aren't heavy, just bulky.
    Last edited by Take-a-knee; 02-07-2008 at 23:11. Reason: spelling

  2. #32
    BillyBob58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Tupelo, MS
    Posts
    8,465
    Images
    353
    Quote Originally Posted by Lost View Post
    I have a SS I used at 17 degrees. Lots on insulation in there - the stock pads, a Z pad and insulbrite fabric. Stayed nice and warm, but I definitely needed all of it. (wind chill around zero). Lot of bult to carry. One of my sons used his Potomac, the other used my Speer Snugfit. Both were very comfortable, and didn't have nearly the bulk to carry that I did. My vote would be for the UQ - less stuff to carry!
    Sounds like, other than the bulk to carry, you had really good results from the SS. 17* plus wind isn't bad. I'm curious, did you already use spare clothing in the undercover or on top of the HH pad, and/or HH kidney/torso pads or a Garlington insulator? Spare clothing adds nothing to the bulk or weight or cost and is pretty effective for me. And the kidney/torso pads compress down a lot better than a Z pad, and a Garlington insulator even more so. And both really work really well.

    I'm surprised that a Potomac is less bulk than the SS, although I guess the included ccf Z pad accounts for that. But, in my case, I always carry at least a minimal pad anyway, in case I have to go to ground one night for some reason. So I will have that with me, even if I am using my PeaPod.

    I have wanted to try some of that insulbrite in place of my regular space blanket. Who carries those?

    But your sons were both warm at 17* ( plus wind chill) with a Potomac or a Snugfit without any added pads? Well if so, that speaks highly of those two items. And that supplies a new temp rating for the Snugfit that is way better than Youngblood's 30* rating!

  3. #33
    Senior Member Lost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Hammock
    ENO Double Nest
    Tarp
    Still looking
    Insulation
    KAQ, Speer
    Posts
    293
    It was just an overnight trip, so no extra clothes to use in the SS. It was a lot to carry, but better safe than sorry, and I needed every bit of it! It was the bulk of the pads, and the Zpad that made up the bulk.

    Joanne's Etc. carries the insulbrite. works really well, and I just wrapped it around the z pad and attached it to the top of the pack.

    As far as the Potomac and Snug Fit - neither used anything else, but Zak did have a sock. Josh brought the Snugfit around him and velcroed it together, so it was kind of like a Peapod! We all stayed very warm, the only problem was getting out into the cold the next morning!

    It's nice having all three options. Although I stayed very warm in the SS, it's much more difficult to set up than just attaching an UB, especially when it's that cold!

  4. #34
    Senior Member greggg3's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    ohio
    Hammock
    HH Deep Jungle Zip XL
    Tarp
    MacCat deluxe
    Insulation
    down
    Suspension
    whoopie sling
    Posts
    231
    My only issue with the SS is how it restricts the width of the hammock. For me the HH hammock is just more comfortable without the SS on. Also the SS creates a ridge in the middle of the hammock that is uncomfortable, and that isn't there when the SS is off.

    As far as warmth, I was very suprised and found it much warmer that I thought it would be. I did use a space blanket whenever I used the SS. I never had any condensation issues at all, and I've used in in sleeting rain, and once in a snow so hard, I'd have to get out every 2 or 3 hours to get the snow off the tarp because it would weigh it down so much it was contacting the netting. Other than condensation on the bottom side of the rain fly (which was no different whether the SS was on or not), for some reason, I just don't have condensation problems on the bottom - but then I can sleep directly on ccf pads with no condensation issues.

    I don't like messing with the fit issues with my JRB underquilt (although its a kick *** top quilt). This is a realy pain with an HH because you have to get out to adjust it. Invariably, I end up with an air gap, or a compressed area that creates a cold spot, so I have to put a ccf pad inside anyway, which screws up the comfort of the hammock. So really I'm not really happy with either system, although both are serviceable. Clearly, its an individual preference kind of thing.

    And Ok, I'll admit, the snugfit has my attention, looks good and people say it solves the fit issue - its just a lot of $$$ to find out whether it will work for me. But I'm turning into a gear collector, so who knows.

    In my opinion, ccf pads offer the best warmth to weight option, I just need a way to maintain the original comfort of the hammock with no pads. So all my hopes and dreams of winter camping comfort, will soon be fulfilled when the no net claytor arrives (then I'll be Neo-nized or would I be a Neo-tite?).

    I think the HH will still be my go-to hammock for summertime.

  5. #35
    BillyBob58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Tupelo, MS
    Posts
    8,465
    Images
    353
    Quote Originally Posted by Lost View Post
    It was just an overnight trip, so no extra clothes to use in the SS. It was a lot to carry, but better safe than sorry, and I needed every bit of it! It was the bulk of the pads, and the Zpad that made up the bulk.

    Joanne's Etc. carries the insulbrite. works really well, and I just wrapped it around the z pad and attached it to the top of the pack.
    Thanks for that info.

    As far as the Potomac and Snug Fit - neither used anything else, but Zak did have a sock. Josh brought the Snugfit around him and velcroed it together, so it was kind of like a Peapod!
    WOW! I had no idea you could do that with a Snugfit.


    We all stayed very warm, the only problem was getting out into the cold the next morning!

    It's nice having all three options. Although I stayed very warm in the SS, it's much more difficult to set up than just attaching an UB, especially when it's that cold!
    Well, I can't argue with that. It's extremely convenient to set up my PeaPod, and unless it is bad out of adjustment you are going to be warm. I really enjoy that aspect. With your SS, did you have any condensation problems?

    Also, do you tear down and set up your SS every night? With either my pod or SS, once I have them set up correctly, I often just leave them set up, and stuff the entire thing into a stuff sack. Often including the sleeping bag/top quilt. One disadvantage of that is I can't use my snake skins, but a Bishop sack would work well. Then, when I attach my hammock to the trees, the SS with pads and space blanket ( or the Pea Pod) is ready to go, with only the most minor adjustments needed. Although, if it is really wet and I am concerned about wet webbing, I probably pack the PeaPod separate from the hammock in a waterproof sack. But, if I am way more concerned with lots of rain/fog/mist and cold but not way below freezing temps, I'm probably going to use the SS any way. Especially above 40* for lows, where I won't have any trouble keeping warm with just the one HH pad and a space blanket.

    I guess I just like both systems, hammocks and insulation systems. They just each have pros and cons IMO, and are tools meant for somewhat different situations. Sometimes ( lots of bugs) I prefer my bottom entry and always prefer the sense of extra roominess inside my HH and prefer the "lay" or whatever you call it. Sometimes I love the inside ridge-line and my system of attaching things to it, sometimes I hate it when my head hits it when trying to get in (not really a big deal). I think my HH, when hung loosely, makes a more comfortable chair. And sometimes I love the SS, especially when concerned about side driven rain and less than optimum tarp coverage. It helps to remember that it is not JUST for cold, but provides additional rain and wind protection. If I want that with my Pod or an UQ, additional weight/bulk and money will be involved. I think lots of folks forget about this benefit of the SS and just think in terms of insulation.

    But sometimes I love my top entry and being able to reach out, and most of all being able to just swing my legs over and put my shoes on with ease. And when it is really cold, it's easier to deal with with the PeaPod. It can be done with the SS, but is just much easier with my PeaPod.

  6. #36
    BillyBob58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Tupelo, MS
    Posts
    8,465
    Images
    353
    Quote Originally Posted by greggg3 View Post
    My only issue with the SS is how it restricts the width of the hammock. For me the HH hammock is just more comfortable without the SS on. Also the SS creates a ridge in the middle of the hammock that is uncomfortable, and that isn't there when the SS is off.
    Yep. That is a disadvantage.


    As far as warmth, I was very suprised and found it much warmer that I thought it would be. I did use a space blanket whenever I used the SS. I never had any condensation issues at all, and I've used in in sleeting rain, and once in a snow so hard, I'd have to get out every 2 or 3 hours to get the snow off the tarp because it would weigh it down so much it was contacting the netting. Other than condensation on the bottom side of the rain fly (which was no different whether the SS was on or not), for some reason, I just don't have condensation problems on the bottom -
    Tell it, Bro! I'm glad to hear I'm not the only one who is condensation free. And I suspect using the SB has something to do with it, though some would think it makes it worse. I just have to scratch my head when I see a report like Birchbark's. What accounts for such differences?


    but then I can sleep directly on ccf pads with no condensation issues.
    That may be a big factor.

    I don't like messing with the fit issues with my JRB underquilt (although its a kick *** top quilt). This is a realy pain with an HH because you have to get out to adjust it. Invariably, I end up with an air gap, or a compressed area that creates a cold spot, so I have to put a ccf pad inside anyway, which screws up the comfort of the hammock. So really I'm not really happy with either system, although both are serviceable. Clearly, its an individual preference kind of thing.
    Now that's interesting. Because most folks seem to think it is a much larger pain adjusting the SS than an UQ. But apparently you don't feel that is the case? I have not used an UQ other than pod style, which is really different for adjustments, because it is supported along a long area at the top as well as suspension cords on the end. But once I get my SS adjusted at home, it's pretty much good to go. With no gaps or compression problems. Actually, I have to watch this more closely even with my pod than I do with the SS.

    And Ok, I'll admit, the snugfit has my attention, looks good and people say it solves the fit issue - its just a lot of $$$ to find out whether it will work for me. But I'm turning into a gear collector, so who knows.
    But if you can still get one for $280, it sure is a bargain!

    In my opinion, ccf pads offer the best warmth to weight option, I just need a way to maintain the original comfort of the hammock with no pads. So all my hopes and dreams of winter camping comfort, will soon be fulfilled when the no net claytor arrives (then I'll be Neo-nized or would I be a Neo-tite?).

    I think the HH will still be my go-to hammock for summertime.
    Yeah, that should be great. I have wondered about using one with my PeaPod. But, does the no net Claytor still have that double layer pad pocket that the Claytor jungle has?

    You might want to look into TeeDee's method of adding Gossamer Gear's thin, super flexible pads, in a "T" formation if needed, on top of the HH OCF pad. He would then have to tighten up the suspension just a bit to keep it against his back. But he swore by it, was good to the teens and could not tell the pads were there. I don't know why I have never yet tried it. I guess because my extra clothing or Garlington insulator has got the job done so far.
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 02-08-2008 at 10:42.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Lost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Hammock
    ENO Double Nest
    Tarp
    Still looking
    Insulation
    KAQ, Speer
    Posts
    293
    [QUOTE=BillyBob58;48963] With your SS, did you have any condensation problems?

    Also, do you tear down and set up your SS every night? [QUOTE]


    No condensation problems with any of the set ups. This was only an overnight trip, so tear down/set up was not an issue. However, I will say that I think the whole SS is a "messy" system and difficult to set up, so I would probably leave it set up for multi day use.

    The only other issue, with so many different things being used for insulation, I needed help getting everything situation after getting into the hammock, or I would have had some cold spots, I'm sure.

  8. #38
    Senior Member greggg3's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    ohio
    Hammock
    HH Deep Jungle Zip XL
    Tarp
    MacCat deluxe
    Insulation
    down
    Suspension
    whoopie sling
    Posts
    231
    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    Now that's interesting. Because most folks seem to think it is a much larger pain adjusting the SS than an UQ. But apparently you don't feel that is the case?
    I thought the SS was very easy since I put it on initially in the backyard, tested it out, then just left it on. At camp, all I had to do was roll out the ocf in between the hammock and the SS, hook the loops thru the side pullouts, then lay the space blanket over it and it was good to go. Never really had to fiddle with adjusting it much. Sometimes I'd just leave the ocf pad and the spaceblanket sandwiched in there and pack it that way (no snakeskins were used this way).

    My experience with the underquilt, a JRB Old Rag Mtn, was that even though it looked really puff and should have been warm - it wasn't. At first my *** and back got cold. People on here were really helpful offering suggestions and I realized that when I got in, I was crushing the insulation so I tried hanging it looser. This was a little better but then the wind would blow a little and I'd get cold. I also had a weather shield, tried putting this on it, and it pulled the suspension down, creating an air gap that was really not warm. Sometimes I could get it where it was sort of OK in the backyard, but I never had the confidence to take it on a trip without taking a ccf pad also. I finally went back to my homemade SPE and replaced my synthetic rayway quilt with the Old Rag Mountain - I really like it as a top quilt and it significantly reduced by bulk when packing.

  9. #39
    BillyBob58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Tupelo, MS
    Posts
    8,465
    Images
    353
    Lost, I see I can put you on the list as yet another with no significant condensation problems.

  10. #40
    Senior Member tomsawyer222's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    ladson SC
    Hammock
    Custom dragon
    Tarp
    Custom made cuben
    Insulation
    custom peapod
    Suspension
    Whoopie sling
    Posts
    255
    Images
    12
    (This does not include extreme cold camping in -20 degree weather) Well to come to the diffence of my Down system i have had my bag get wet and my peapod get weight it multiple differant temperatures and i have never had a probablem drying it out... I think that the probablems with drying down are very greatly exagerated. Of course if the bag were to be put into a creek to sit and get completly soaking wet it would dry slow beacuse it is not very easy to wring the water out of down like it is with synthetics but how many people with any sense and a tarp have had a bag of any kind get that wet? That only happens in tent situations when the tent "Bathtub floor" holds the water that gets inside. As far as condinsation is concerned you wont accumulate so much that the peapod or sleeping bag wont dry in a few hours even in mild to cold weather. I have often walked with my Peapod hanging out the top of my pack loose behind me so that it can get fresh air and a good drying (I look like a ninja turtle from the back) this method seems to work great the more sun the better. Of course if it is raining then no luck... but then you are just a little more cautious with your shelter and keep dry. I have a tarp much bigger than is needed for just that reason the weight is well worth it. But every time you get in the pod or bag the heat you generate will drive moisture from the bag and it will not accumulate more than a certain amount. If moisture from the body is that much of a probablem then get a VB liner for the down bag. Yes the peapod is more expensive but i have been through alot of gear and so far the only things i am still using are the things i paid good money for and got a quality product in return. The wind resistance issue with the peapod is slowly being overcome with the larger tarps that turn into fully inclosed tents and with hammock socks. Both systems might work but the pod will work if you have to go to the ground too as a large over bag the pad with the SS would work somewhat but no where near as warm then. Also like Billybob said the peapod is very quick to set up. The more pieces you have the more adjustment is needed. The peapod allows you to vent if you are too hot also with out getting out.

    (Of course my big complaint i wish the peapod had a nice big #10 YKK zipper instead of the velcro i would carry the weight no probablem.)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •