Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32
  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Orleans, LA
    Posts
    3,565
    Images
    57
    Yeah I have made the decision when I start going through my whole kit now I am going to try and simplify as much as possible.

    I think that will take the weight and the hassle down, while still giving me a lot of options.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  2. #12
    Senior Member Quoddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    New York/Vermont Border
    Hammock
    Warbonnet BB and Warbonnet Traveler
    Tarp
    MacCat Custom Spin
    Insulation
    Yeti UQ/Nunatak TQ
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    395
    Images
    28
    Although I have the 'biners, I've just been feeding the straps through the 2" loops without them. Any particular reason this isn't the way to go, other than taking about 5 seconds extra?

  3. #13
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    near Memphis, TN
    Hammock
    WB Traveler
    Tarp
    ZPacks CF
    Insulation
    Te-Wa / HG / WB
    Suspension
    Whoopie Hooks
    Posts
    9,686
    Images
    92
    Quote Originally Posted by Quoddy View Post
    Although I have the 'biners, I've just been feeding the straps through the 2" loops without them. Any particular reason this isn't the way to go, other than taking about 5 seconds extra?
    There have been reports that threading webbing through itself like that is more abrasive than using a biner, and can cause surface wear that leads to binding. I'm not aware of any evidence to support that, though.

    If I were you, I'd use it that way for a while and just keep a watch on the surface of the webbing inside the loop where it crosses through itself. If you see any abrasion or wear, then you know a biner is needed. If not, then you'll know it isn't going to be a problem for you.

    Either way, it might be nice for you to report back about it after using it that way for a while. The more information about that use we have the better.
    I think that when the lies are all told and forgot the truth will be there yet. It dont move about from place to place and it dont change from time to time. You cant corrupt it any more than you can salt salt. - Cormac McCarthy

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Orleans, LA
    Posts
    3,565
    Images
    57
    Quote Originally Posted by angrysparrow View Post
    There have been reports that threading webbing through itself like that is more abrasive than using a biner, and can cause surface wear that leads to binding. I'm not aware of any evidence to support that, though.

    If I were you, I'd use it that way for a while and just keep a watch on the surface of the webbing inside the loop where it crosses through itself. If you see any abrasion or wear, then you know a biner is needed. If not, then you'll know it isn't going to be a problem for you.

    Either way, it might be nice for you to report back about it after using it that way for a while. The more information about that use we have the better.
    I had this problem after a night or two. The stresses involved seemed to melt the 2 straps together. I could pull them apart but they showed signs of wear.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  5. #15
    Senior Member hangnout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Monterey, TN
    Hammock
    DIY Bridge
    Tarp
    DIY Tarps
    Insulation
    Leigh's UQ's
    Posts
    1,716
    Images
    122
    I had this problem after a night or two. The stresses involved seemed to melt the 2 straps together. I could pull them apart but they showed signs of wear.
    I noticed this more with polypro webbing. I had it melt together to the point it was hard to pull apart. I have not noticed it as much with the HD polyester and the seatbelt polyester does not have this problem that I have noticed. I am currently using some 1.5" seatbelt polyester from strapworks that weighs .25oz a foot. I sewed a loop in one end and then went 4-5' from the loop and doubled the webbing over to make a .75" strap for the remainder of the length. Works great with the rings this way. The 1.5" seatbelt polyester is lighter than the 1" that strapwork sells.

  6. #16
    Senior Member TiredFeet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    MD
    Hammock
    TeeDee Bridge Hammock
    Tarp
    Customized JRB
    Insulation
    Down or IX
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    1,100
    Images
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by HANGnOUT View Post
    I noticed this more with polypro webbing. I had it melt together to the point it was hard to pull apart. I have not noticed it as much with the HD polyester and the seatbelt polyester does not have this problem that I have noticed. I am currently using some 1.5" seatbelt polyester from strapworks that weighs .25oz a foot. I sewed a loop in one end and then went 4-5' from the loop and doubled the webbing over to make a .75" strap for the remainder of the length. Works great with the rings this way. The 1.5" seatbelt polyester is lighter than the 1" that strapwork sells.
    Are you saying that the 1.5" seatbelt webbing from strapworks is lighter than the 1" seatbelt webbing from strapworks??

    I got some of the 1" polyester seatbelt webbing from strapworks and sewed loops on the ends for tree huggers. That stuff works great. They don't give a rating on it, only say that it is close in strength to the regular polyester webbing. I assume that means it is close to 3500 lbs, say over 3000 lbs.

  7. #17
    Senior Member hangnout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Monterey, TN
    Hammock
    DIY Bridge
    Tarp
    DIY Tarps
    Insulation
    Leigh's UQ's
    Posts
    1,716
    Images
    122
    Are you saying that the 1.5" seatbelt webbing from strapworks is lighter than the 1" seatbelt webbing from strapworks??

    I got some of the 1" polyester seatbelt webbing from strapworks and sewed loops on the ends for tree huggers. That stuff works great. They don't give a rating on it, only say that it is close in strength to the regular polyester webbing. I assume that means it is close to 3500 lbs, say over 3000 lbs.
    Yes it is. It is wider but thinner. I ordered the 1.5" first then thought I would save some weight and ordered the 1". It is thicker and about .4 oz a foot.
    Last edited by hangnout; 02-17-2008 at 11:52.

  8. #18
    Senior Member TiredFeet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    MD
    Hammock
    TeeDee Bridge Hammock
    Tarp
    Customized JRB
    Insulation
    Down or IX
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    1,100
    Images
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by HANGnOUT View Post
    Yes it is. It is thinner but wider. I ordered the 1.5" first then thought I would save some weight and ordered the 1". It is thicker and about .4 oz a foot.

    That I like. I'll have to tr some of the 1.5" seatbelt webbing.

  9. #19
    Oms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    La Grange Park, IL
    Hammock
    BB 1.1-1.7 Lefty
    Tarp
    HG, OES, WB
    Insulation
    HG, WB, Nunatak
    Suspension
    Whoopies/webbing
    Posts
    1,012
    I recently bought a HH hammock which has buckles on it, but it did not come with the straps. I am a little puzzled by why loops are needed on the straps. Do you choke the strap and then feed it through the buckle or is that too much stress for the loop. I figured to tie it off like a Speers where it wraps around the tree several times and then sinch it down with the buckles. Is there a different way you guys are doing it? Also what is a good type of stap/material to use? I agree to go longer on the straps. When I set up the Speers I would have to find smaller trees in order to go around several times.
    Thanks for the info.

  10. #20
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    near Memphis, TN
    Hammock
    WB Traveler
    Tarp
    ZPacks CF
    Insulation
    Te-Wa / HG / WB
    Suspension
    Whoopie Hooks
    Posts
    9,686
    Images
    92
    Quote Originally Posted by Oms View Post
    I am a little puzzled by why loops are needed on the straps.
    We use loops and a biner to make things faster, on the tree end.





    Quote Originally Posted by Oms View Post
    Do you choke the strap and then feed it through the buckle or is that too much stress for the loop.
    ??

    Quote Originally Posted by Oms View Post
    I figured to tie it off like a Speers where it wraps around the tree several times and then sinch it down with the buckles. Is there a different way you guys are doing it?
    There is no need to wrap the trees multiple times. Once is quite sufficient.

    Quote Originally Posted by Oms View Post
    Also what is a good type of stap/material to use? I agree to go longer on the straps.
    Polyester webbing has the least stretch, so is most appropriate for the purpose. Here, Strapworks offers a 'simple sling' (your choice of length of 1" polyester seatbelt webbing including sewn end loops).
    I think that when the lies are all told and forgot the truth will be there yet. It dont move about from place to place and it dont change from time to time. You cant corrupt it any more than you can salt salt. - Cormac McCarthy

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •