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  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta
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    2

    First time hammocker

    I'm fairly new to backpacking, having done a few trips last year, and completely new to hammocks. I am considering purchasing the following equipment:
    - Hennessy Ultralite Backpacker A-Sym Hammock
    - Hennessy UnderCover and UnderPad
    - Snake Skins 2
    - Automatic fly tensioner?

    I am a male between 165 lb and 175 lb. I hike in the Canadian rockies and camp below the tree line, in and around Banff and Jasper. I'm not really interested in hiking when it drops below +5C (40F), and try to stay above +10C (50F). I'd call off a hiking trip if the weather looked to be particularly rainy or windy, but as I have done and will continue to do ~4 day trips, this is not a guarantee. My sleeping bag is good to about -5C or -7C (20F).

    I'm a side sleeper. I'm interested in saving pounds but not really saving ounces on my equipment. I'm particularly interested in hammocks, though, because of how quickly you can break camp with them in the morning. Breaking camp is the bane of my existence.

    Are my purchase choices above likely to be appropriate? Should I seriously be considering any additional purchases? I'm particularly concerned about warmth around +5C when it is a bit windy. Anything on my list that I actually don't need? I'm not interested in making my own equipment as I am useless at handiwork. I'm obviously not wanting to waste money but I'm happy to spend some if it is worthwhile.

  2. #2
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Lawrenceville, Ga
    Hammock
    JRB Bear Mtn. Bridge
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    BlackCat/JRB 11x10
    Insulation
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    Welcome to the forum.

    I've owned a few Hennessys. Still own the UL Backpacker. I use another hammock now. The JRB bridge hammock. I would probably forget about the fly tensioner/water collector. Here's a recent thread about it http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...highlight=rain
    As far as the undercover/overpad goes, I have no experience with it. It is not very popular around here although I have heard of it working for a few. Most use either closed cell pad(s) or an underquilt or a combination of both. A Speer SPE with a pad(s) is a good low cost option. www.speerhammocks.com/Products/SPE.htm
    The stock tarp is kinda the same way, not very popular as most have opted for a bigger tarp with more coverage. That tarp is tiny. Ordering the hex fly from Hennessy is a good idea. Ask them to send it instead. It is best attached to the trees and not to the hammock. Even with the stock tarp. Read here about the reasons why it is best attached to the tree. And be sure to check out the rest of this great site. www.tothewoods.net/HammockCampingDry.html
    I'd give some more thought about camping/hiking under 40F
    With the proper gear, cold weather hanging in Canada would be pure bliss to many of us hangers down here.
    Last edited by FanaticFringer; 02-18-2008 at 12:47.
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

  3. #3
    Dutch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Reinholds, PA
    Hammock
    Bridgeskin
    Tarp
    DIY Blackcat
    Insulation
    DIY Quilts
    Suspension
    Whoopie sling
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    Welcome to HF. It is so difficult to give advise since these things are just personal preference. I started with a HH ULBA and still use it. It has great bug protection and is well made. I like the bottom entry, but some people don't. It has an non-removable bug net and there are some who don't like that either. The fly is just barely big enough and I recommend the larger hex fly or you will be shopping for a larger tarp later. The over cover and under pad should get you in the temp ranges you hike in. I don't have them and others will probably chime in for and against it. I started with a simple z-rest pad that I have had many wrestling matches with, but I always won. Many move toward quilts, but first see if you truely like hammocking since quilts cost as much as your entire set-up. I have never heard anyone that likes the rain tensioners and I think they are a gimmick to help with a poorly designed tarp. HH has the tarp attach to the support lines, but that makes the tarp sag whenyou get in, and the attache bug net makes it so you can't adjust it. It is a widely held belief that it is better to tie the tarp directly to the tree. The snake skins are a good addition and help keep your hammock dry while setting up. I keep my tarp seperate so it doesn't wet my hammock and I can set it up first since I am tying to the tree. If I were to suggest a newbie setup I would recommend a ULBA with skins and a hex tarp with some kind of pad. Have fun hammocking, be careful it is addictive.
    Peace Dutch
    GA>ME 2003


    http://dutchwaregear.com

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  4. #4
    Dutch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Reinholds, PA
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    I must say FF that is some good advise, I have to get qicker at typing.
    Peace Dutch
    GA>ME 2003


    http://dutchwaregear.com

    Visit Dutchwaregear on facebook (and like it)

    8th Annual Mt Rogers Winter Hang Spreadsheet

  5. #5
    Mule's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kokomo IN
    Hammock
    Warbonnet Ridge Runner
    Tarp
    ZPACK CUBEN
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    quilts
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    Web'g cinch buckle
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    Welcome. Sure hope you sponsor a big hangout up there someday. I would love that. Mule
    There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and the enemy. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion.
    Gen. William Thornson, U.S. Army

  6. #6
    New Member
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    Feb 2008
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta
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    Thank you, everyone, for your feedback. I very much appreciate it. Looks like you have answered all of my questions.

  7. #7
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Jan 2007
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    Tupelo, MS
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    I have been pretty happy with the HH undercover and pad( SuperShelter- AKA SS, though sometimes that means snakeskins). I can do 40*F with it with one hand tied behind my back, especially if I use the recommended space blanket addition ( 2 oz, $2). Into the high 20s or lower by adding the HH kidney/torso pad and or clothing and/or Garlington insulator ( trash bag with a space blanket inside) If there is ever the slightest chance of having to go to ground ( no trees, regulations etc), you may, like me, always carry a minimal back up pad. With nothing but a Ridgerest pad and Speer SPE added to the SS, I can easily do below 20*, with thicker or additional pads way lower. YMMV and probably will. You will need to practice with it to make sure you are hanging it right, without to much sag, mainly.

    I love Snake skins. They are Uber convenient and uber fast. They will not work with the HH underpad, you will have to remove it before tucking everything into the skins. I often use a smaller set of skins with my tarp and the largest size to enclose my HH plus undercover. Or sometimes I just leave the pad in AND my sleeping bag inside and stuff the whole enchilada ( except for tarp, in separate skins) in a large stuff sack.

    You will probably prefer a larger tarp tied to the trees. MacCats are excellent, if you can get Hennessy to sell you a hammock without the tarp. Or as others have said, just get the free HH Hex tarp. Some few are happy with the stock tarp. I used on for a week once, and that sure was minimal weight. I stayed dry without tying to the trees, but in wind it flapped like crazy and nearly deafened me. There are several tricks that help with this, but they are a lot of bother. You can tie it to the trees and improve it's wind performance a lot, but then you might not have adequate rain coverage if the hammock sags much. It can be done with the stock tarp, tied to trees or tied to the hammock suspension, but it sure is easier with a larger tarp tied to trees. Plus it will give you a lot more living space for when you are not in the hammock. It will penalize you from a few to 9 or more ounces, plus some more money if you get something other than the free HH hex tarp.

    Good luck and enjoy.
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 02-19-2008 at 13:20.

  8. #8
    Mule's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kokomo IN
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    When I had my HH and used it on a Red River Gorge hangout, the Super Shelter did really good down to about 35 degrees, both nights. I didn't have to use the space blanket either. On the second night I think it was supposed to get down to freezing so I installed the over cover with the hole around your face, I burned up in there. Mule
    There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and the enemy. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion.
    Gen. William Thornson, U.S. Army

  9. #9
    Mule's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kokomo IN
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    Warbonnet Ridge Runner
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    ZPACK CUBEN
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    I should also add that I was using a Big Agnus insulated pad under me too. Mule
    There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and the enemy. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion.
    Gen. William Thornson, U.S. Army

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