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  1. #11
    Bruciehi5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Australia, Brisbane, Queensland
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    WarBonnet Blackbird 1.1
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    Home made job.
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    Shock Cord Measurements

    Hello Packeagle,

    Love my ponchos! Iíve got two, one with mod, one without. I have attached a photo, I hope it helps you!

    125mm from the top (shoulder) of the poncho, then the width of the shock cord 5mm.

    The shock cord sticks out from the edge of the poncho 32mm and is connected to the poncho with 21mm of shock cord. A total of 32+21= 53mm and a total length of 106mm.

    387mm from the top (shoulder) of the poncho, then the width of the shock cord 5mm.


    Have fun!

    Briciehi5
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #12
    packeagle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Saginaw, Michigan
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    DIY Table Cloth/ Jerry 5
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    11x12' Hex Sil
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    Thanks! I got a response in PM from the Jacks. This is a very through explanation though. How do you use your poncho? Does it provide to be durable enough to double as raingear? Im trying to lighten my pack and replace my 20oz Froggtoggs with the 10 oz Driducks poncho/undercover.

  3. #13
    Bruciehi5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Australia, Brisbane, Queensland
    Hammock
    WarBonnet Blackbird 1.1
    Tarp
    WarBonnet Edge
    Insulation
    4 JRB quilts.
    Suspension
    Home made job.
    Posts
    664
    It is durable enough to double as raingear, but only just. While wearing my DriDuck, with JRB mod, I soon discovered that it doesn't take much to put holes in it (very small holes so far). The people who sell them donít try to keep that a secret. On standard walking tracks you just have to be mindful of the odd vine or branch and itís quite ok. If you do off track walks, youíll kill it!

    I was so impressed with the DriDucks Poncho with mod, when I was ordering some other stuff from JRB, I ordered a standard DriDucks Poncho to use as a throw away. So far I have only gotten 4 or 5 very small holes in it that are so small that I can only see them from the inside where it is darkish (see the light). From the outside they look like little whiteish scruff marks. I have patched one of them on the inside with duck or stage tape, which stuck to the poncho really well, just to see if the tape would stick, more than anything.

    The thinking is, save the more expensive one with the mod just for the weather shield, and use the throw away to hike in. The trick is to buy one or more when you are buying something else as well, like a quilt, so as to not pay to post just that.

    The very best thing about this poncho can be summed up with the following sentence I took from the JRB website:

    ***The waterproof and breathable fabric allows the heat and moisture to escape while repelling the wind and rain.

    It really does actually do that, normal ponchos donít! Still gets a little warm in warmish weather.

    Just in case you are wondering, if the weather is looking a bit like rain, I will store the weather shield poncho in the bottom of a 20 litre (676 ounces) compression sack along with some bed cloths, pillow, camp shoes, towel, and two JRB quilts. It compresses down as far as it can go whether I have the poncho in it or not, so I figure I may as well take it. Two DriDuck ponchos weigh less than one normal poncho,so Iím still ahead of the game. The standard poncho is folded and stored in the top of my pack for quick access, or between my pack and pack cover.

    I just replied to another post and part of that reply will further answer your question, ďHow do you use your poncho?Ē

    <<<<<
    I have also discovered that while walking in showery conditions, I can fold up and store my DriDucks Poncho in between my pack and pack cover (shake the water off, fold it and dry with your shirt what is still visible first). It is very easy to reach behind and take the poncho out when it rains and put it back when it stops, without having to take my pack off, or stop walking for that matter. With my poncho covering my pack cover and my pack cover covering my pack, my JRB quilts are sure to stay dry.
    <<<<<

    As a weather shield it stops water getting in the under quilt, and it also makes a good wind and cold air shield. Iím finding it most useful for this. When I do eventually throw it away, Iím sure I will have gotten a lot more than my moneys worth out of this poncho. So, for the price, Iíd say that the standard one is durable enough to use as rain gear. The modified one is only just, and only if you can tread carefully.

    Well, Packeagle, Itís getting late, Iíve got my hammock set up in the backyard and I think I can hear it calling me!

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