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  1. #1
    New Member Blubricks's Avatar
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    Zing-it Complete suspension?

    Hey All, Great site here. First post. I have an ENO DOublenest and I have a trip coming up in a few weeks and it seems there are 1001 ways to hang. That's wonderful, but as I still have a bunch of equipment to buy (Tarp, Steripen, and a frypan, most importantly, which I may ask about in another post) I want to keep everything simple and lightweight, though I'm not counting grams. My question, not seeing a difference between Zing-it and Lash-it which seem to have a coating to hold knots better than the standard Amsteel Dyneema. Would it be fair to say that the 180' roll of Zing-it/Lash-it (<$30)would make my entire Hammock/Tarp suspension easy and "fair-priced"? I'm not afraid of knots, in fact, I prefer them. As far as "tree huggers" I have a couple rubber exhaust tubes that I'm trying out to slide the cord through. Also, a few feet of shock cord or something similar for tie-outs will be on my order as well. The other option involving poly web from Strapworks for the hammock suspension and then some generic poly line for a ridgeline. Am I missing something?

  2. #2
    Mr. Arrowhead pgibson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blubricks View Post
    Am I missing something?
    Yep lash/zing it is rated to 450 or 650 pounds depending on which size...neither are strong enough for hammock suspension--Especially if used with a knot. Knots de-rate the strength of most rope by 50% or more and dyneema like lash/zing it is worse than that in most cases. Depending on your weight 1000 -1400 pound line is the minimum and splicing is greatly preferred at those ratings as it only de-rates the line by 3-5% in most cases.

    For a tarp set up they are fine but should not be used for any thing you want to hold your butt of the ground.
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  3. #3
    New Member Blubricks's Avatar
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    Isn't this the material used for whoopie slings?

  4. #4
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blubricks View Post
    Isn't this the material used for whoopie slings?
    No, that's Amsteel.

    Amsteel is also made of Dyneema like Lash/Zing It, but is larger diameter. 7/64" Amsteel (1600lbs rating) is the minimum recommended for most hangers suspension.

    Some of the really lightweight folks use NERopes Dynaglide (1000lbs rating, dyneema, spliceable), but it should be done with caution as the safety factor is minimal, in particular if using knots instead of splices.
    I think that when the lies are all told and forgot the truth will be there yet. It dont move about from place to place and it dont change from time to time. You cant corrupt it any more than you can salt salt. - Cormac McCarthy

  5. #5
    Member johnfolsomjr's Avatar
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    No, that's Amsteel.

    Amsteel is also made of Dyneema like Lash/Zing It, but is larger diameter. 7/64" Amsteel (1600lbs rating) is the minimum recommended for most hangers suspension.
    AngrySparrow beat me to it
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  6. #6
    New Member Blubricks's Avatar
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    Ok, so the Zing/Lash isn't Amsteel's Dyneema rope "with a coating" , ok. That's good to know. Thank you very much for such quick answers! I was looking at Redden's Marine site after seeing references to it here. I should stick with the Amsteel Blue, 7/64 or 1/8th from what I've read. How much would you say is a typical length in total for the hammock suspension. and would you say it would be overkill to use for a tarp ridgeline?

  7. #7
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blubricks View Post
    Ok, so the Zing/Lash isn't Amsteel's Dyneema rope "with a coating" , ok.
    Actually, it is. Dyneema (UHMWP) is the same 'material'. But, Zing/Lash It is a much smaller diameter cord than Amsteel. You need the extra strength of the larger diameter cord for suspension purposes, to be safe.

    Quote Originally Posted by Blubricks View Post
    I should stick with the Amsteel Blue, 7/64 or 1/8th from what I've read.
    That's correct.

    Quote Originally Posted by Blubricks View Post
    How much would you say is a typical length in total for the hammock suspension. and would you say it would be overkill to use for a tarp ridgeline?
    Most suspensions allow at least 6-10 feet of reach at each hammock end, not including tree huggers. Some people choose even longer reach.

    How much Amsteel you'll need is going to depend on the suspension type. If you make/buy whoopie slings, the average pair starts with 13-15ft of Amsteel per sling, which is reduced by splices and the adjustable loop that doubles up.

    Quote Originally Posted by Blubricks View Post
    and would you say it would be overkill to use for a tarp ridgeline?
    Unfortunately yes. Amsteel's strength is overkill for tarps. LashIt or ZingIt is smaller, and more appropriate. But there are many types of cording that work fine for tarps.
    I think that when the lies are all told and forgot the truth will be there yet. It dont move about from place to place and it dont change from time to time. You cant corrupt it any more than you can salt salt. - Cormac McCarthy

  8. #8
    New Member Blubricks's Avatar
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    Awesome! Just what I needed to know Angry! Thank you SO Much, Angry, John, and Pgib! Now I just have to settle on a tarp :-P

  9. #9
    Senior Member WarmSoda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blubricks View Post
    As far as "tree huggers" I have a couple rubber exhaust tubes that I'm trying out to slide the cord through.
    Your solution for tree huggers needs some help as well. Try reading this link to get you started.
    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...ad.php?t=12531

    The problem is that running the line through the tubes won't spread out the pressure of the line on the tree. The small cord will still put all the pressure on a small area. The idea behind the straps is that the pressure is spread out over an inch wide and won't be as damaging to the trees. Without trees we can't hang.

  10. #10

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    There is a ton of info here on the forum but that makes for a lot to digest. You have gotten some good replies, these guys here really know what they are doing. Here are a couple of other common starting points that may (or may not ) work for you.

    Whoopie - 7/64 amsteel for whoopie slings - a 6 foot long whoopie takes approx 14 feet of line to make.

    1" tree straps - 6 foot is a common length, some go longer, some carry 7/64 amsteel extensions with fixed eyes at each end. Check out AHE - very nice straps and cheep. Several other venders here also carry good tree straps.

    Tarp ridge line - 30 feet for a single line, 2 10 ft lines if not continuous (1 at each end of tarp) 1.75 or 2.25 zing it is great

    Tarp guy lines - 1.75 or 2.25 zing/lash it is good. common length in 6-10 foot each.

    Hammock structual ridge line - usually around 80-100 inches finished length. Again the zing/lash it is fine, many people also make this a whoopie sling so that they can adjust it while finding the ideal length.

    As you noted there are a thousand ways to do each little thing, these are just suggestions/good starting points. Some people have used the braided mason lines for the tarp lines (probably not a good idea for a structual (hammock) ridge line). The dynaglide is also popular as mentioned. The amsteel and the zing it can be spliced to make continuous loops and soft shackles, both also helpful.

    Hope this helps some. Have fun and good luck.
    Jason

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