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  1. #21
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    Fabulous!

    I built one of these using the "plans" found in the DIY forum and, while it didn't turn out exactly the same as the plans, it still turned out great. I have spent the last two nights in it and it is working great. I weigh 260lbs. My eyehooks are 6ft up, the span is 133", my suspension length is 1' 6" and my ridgeline on a skeeter beeter pro is 101".

    I built it using 8 2x4s (standard 8' length) for studs. The cheap douglas fir ones.

    4 - 1/2x8 zinc nuts/bolts with washer on each end.
    4 - 1/2x5 zinc nuts/bolts with washer on each end.

    Deck screws to hold on the legs and to hold the spacers in place.

    With this configuration I can remove the two bolts for the diagonal supports and the bolt from the bottom of one of the uprights and fold it up for "easy" transport.
    Last edited by mikewithe; 05-16-2011 at 15:49. Reason: hyphenation of numbers for clarification

  2. #22
    in it for the naps oldgringo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitmanx View Post
    Earplug, that looks a great design!

    I am just about to cut my first pieces of lumber for a project just like this!





    oldgringo,



    Why exactly do you believe Western Red Cedar to be unsuitable for hammock stands?



    Most projects that I have used WRC for still very much smell like WRC... Even the pergolla and arbour/gate we put in spring 2008 (this one still smells when it gets wet)

    IMO, Western Red Cedar is a superiour wood to pressure treated spruce/pine/fir...

    maybe the WRC we get up here in canada is different? Its from British Columbia...

    just my $0.02...
    You may very well get a better grade of lumber where you live. Here, it's used mostly for fencing. It's light, splits easily, and isn't something I would trust. My comment on aroma addressed eastern red cedar, which is a very different critter altogether...it's not even a true cedar, but rather a juniper. Neither of them hold up in ground contact as well as pressure treated yellow pine, in my experience. YMMV.
    Dave

    http://www.uark.edu/misc/xtimber/rna/pattonsbluff.html

    It has always been my private conviction that any man who pits his intelligence against a fish and loses has it coming.
    John Steinbeck

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