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Thread: Bicycle Touring

  1. #91
    AScott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLRider View Post
    Sure, that'd do just fine for short (less than 40 miles a day) trips. Adding panniers to it is...odd, but doable. I'd be careful of what tires you put on it, though; gravel can be tough to ride on with road tires, depending on the subgrade. Personally, I'd take it in to a reputable local shop and talk with them about what you want to do.

    If you know anyone in your local area who bikes on a regular basis (I mean touring or mountain biking or racing, not just around town), ask them where they get their bike serviced and what their impression of the place is. That should lead you to some good folks who really know bikes and are willing to work with you on what you want.
    Thanks. There are a couple of shops in the area, but the closest is about 15 miles. I'll have to wait until my next trip to town. I'm fairly isolated out here. I don't really know anyone who bikes more than casually.

    Why would panniers be odd on this bike? Those are the bags on the back, right? If I add a rack they should be OK, shouldn't they? I can't imagine riding with a pack, so I need some way to carry my gear.

    Like I said, I'm totally new to this. I may be asking the wrong questions.
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  2. #92
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    Longtime BOB dragger here.

    Many miles on rail trails, single-track, fire roads and paved roads.

    Dragging a BOB does feel IMO to be less efficient than carrying gear in panniers. It might be due to the 16" wheel, but anytime one adds another tire contact patch there has to be more drag.

    But for single-track riding the BOB is excellent! Really does live up to the hype about tracking.

    Other advantages to a BOB are that you can pull into a campground, unload your gear, and then cruise the other sites for firewood. Or ride to the camp store for a 12-pack. Turn the BOB over and it makes a good table for cooking.

    Jim

  3. #93
    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AScott View Post
    Thanks. There are a couple of shops in the area, but the closest is about 15 miles. I'll have to wait until my next trip to town. I'm fairly isolated out here. I don't really know anyone who bikes more than casually.

    Why would panniers be odd on this bike? Those are the bags on the back, right? If I add a rack they should be OK, shouldn't they? I can't imagine riding with a pack, so I need some way to carry my gear.

    Like I said, I'm totally new to this. I may be asking the wrong questions.
    It may still be worth a trip into town. Check out all of the shop reviews that you can find via the Internet; it's not as good as knowing someone who bikes, but it's better than nothing.

    Panniers would be odd with that bike 'cause most folks don't tour with that style of bike. It's just outside my personal experience to see someone with serious panniers (not the little rack baskets, but full panniers) on a bike like that. Then again, it would be outside my experience to see someone with serious panniers on my bike, too...

    Yep, if you add a rack, they should go on just fine. Another thing you might want to think about is frame bags instead of panniers. If you're going ultralight, it may be worth skipping the weight of the frame altogether and simply strapping stuff sacks to the bike frame proper.

    MedicineMan shows off a couple of bikes using that method in this video, at about the 0:50 and 8:00 marks. Both give a good feel for what it looks like with a seat bag and handlebar bag attached to a bike. You can also go with a frame bag (it is in the shape of the hole in the frame under your torso and is narrow to avoid knee strikes as you pedal) for more storage.

    Or, if you want to get creative, I simply strap my pack to the seat. I show how in the beginning of this video:



    It also shows it off towards the 9:30 mark.

    Hope it helps!

  4. #94
    AScott's Avatar
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    Thanks, FLRider. I've been waiting to do this for awhile. I'm afraid I'm not going to be able to hike as much as I once could due to health, but I'm thinking cycling may be able to take its place and allow me to still "get out there."
    If your lucky enough to be outdoors, your lucky enough!


  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jsaults View Post
    Many miles on rail trails, single-track, fire roads and paved roads.

    Dragging a BOB does feel IMO to be less efficient than carrying gear in panniers. It might be due to the 16" wheel, but anytime one adds another tire contact patch there has to be more drag.

    But for single-track riding the BOB is excellent! Really does live up to the hype about tracking.

    Other advantages to a BOB are that you can pull into a campground, unload your gear, and then cruise the other sites for firewood. Or ride to the camp store for a 12-pack. Turn the BOB over and it makes a good table for cooking.

    Jim
    Yea, I agree with this synopsis. There is more friction due to an extra tire in contact with the road, more weight to haul, and added wind resistance. However, I think BOBs are useful in an urban setting because you can use them to haul bulky items like ladders, chairs, 4 large packages, or whatnot.

  6. #96
    Senior Member affreeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pulsemod View Post
    Yea, I agree with this synopsis. There is more friction due to an extra tire in contact with the road, more weight to haul, and added wind resistance. However, I think BOBs are useful in an urban setting because you can use them to haul bulky items like ladders, chairs, 4 large packages, or whatnot.
    The big problem with a BOB trailer is that whoever is touring with you can't draft off you!
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  7. #97
    Member Sirkyi's Avatar
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    Thanks guys for all the info I'm gathering info for a longish bike/hammock trip.

  8. #98
    Member mtndragon's Avatar
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    Here is a blog from a gentleman who I hosted at my house via warmshowers.org in the fall of last year.

    http://seetombike.wordpress.com/

    He started out in New Jersey, and rode across the country, using a hammock. By the time he reached me in Lake Tahoe, he had been on the road for a couple of months and of that time, he said he was only unable to hang 2-3 nights tops. He is using a Henessey with NO underquilt and no pad. Rugged for sure, and very inspirational. His near daily updates make for great reading.

  9. #99
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    I'm on a cycle trip myself and recently picked up a hammock.


    was my hang a couple of nights back. The Brazilian fire station said I could sleep in their bus. Not so clean, but the hammock helped with that.

  10. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by obow View Post
    I'm on a cycle trip myself and recently picked up a hammock.


    was my hang a couple of nights back. The Brazilian fire station said I could sleep in their bus. Not so clean, but the hammock helped with that.
    How many people can say that they hammocked inside of an old Brazilian bus? I love it. Building life stories!
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    TREEfool.com < < hammock dangerously
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