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Thread: Bicycle Touring

  1. #81
    Member mtndragon's Avatar
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    I have a cross bike that I use for road touring and bikepacking. Of those two bikes listed, I think you would have the most fun touring on the Cannondale because it has a triple crank. In order to get the gearing needed to get up hills with a light, light touring load I had to swap out my rear derailuer for an XT mtn bike derailuer so I could run an 11-36 rear cassette. I live in the mountains of California, so some extra gears were needed to get up hills with my light touring kit. I use a seatpack, frame bag, and handlebar sling from Revelate. I know South Carolina has some hills, so think about your gearing. The other factor in bike selection for touring will be tires. I would be surprised if either of those bikes take tires wider than 28c, which may or may not be wide enough for your weight and touring kit. When I tour, I use 40c tires, which barely fit in my frame. You can tour on any bike really with bikepacking gear as none of it needs rack braze ons to mount the load, but the two factors I would weigh most highly are tire size the frame will accept and gearing. Good luck.

    Quote Originally Posted by FireInMyBones View Post
    I've wanted to try bikepacking, but want to sell my mountain bike. I so rarely use my mountain bike, except on the road (where it's not very cozy), it's sad. I want a nice road bike for road racing, triathlons and maybe some commuting. Does anyone tour on the road? I'm looking at the Cannondale Synapse Alloy 105 or the Raleigh REVENIO 3.0 if it makes any difference. I'd most likely be upgrading the wheels out for lighter ones for on the road. I could put cyclecross tires on the old wheel set for dirt that's not too bumpy. I really don't want a cyclecross bike (as far as I know) since off roading on my bike is becoming less appealing to me.

    Thoughts?

  2. #82
    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireInMyBones View Post
    I've wanted to try bikepacking, but want to sell my mountain bike. I so rarely use my mountain bike, except on the road (where it's not very cozy), it's sad. I want a nice road bike for road racing, triathlons and maybe some commuting. Does anyone tour on the road? I'm looking at the Cannondale Synapse Alloy 105 or the Raleigh REVENIO 3.0 if it makes any difference. I'd most likely be upgrading the wheels out for lighter ones for on the road. I could put cyclecross tires on the old wheel set for dirt that's not too bumpy. I really don't want a cyclecross bike (as far as I know) since off roading on my bike is becoming less appealing to me.

    Thoughts?
    I do, but I also make compromises that most folks who do tour on the road aren't willing to. Example: I ride a Manhatten Flyer 6 (a 45-pound all-steel, a-frame beach cruiser with only six speeds). And my seat post rack carries my pack (the same one you'll see tomorrow) instead of going with frame bags or panniers.

    Advantages: more comfortable over shorter distances (under fifty miles), cheaper, more modular, fits my riding style better (I prefer to have my lower back be happy with me over my seat being happy with me after a long ride).

    Disadvantages: less comfortable over longer distances (above fifty miles), slower due to wind resistance, harder to go uphill (a not inconsiderable thing where you live, but down here it isn't as much of a disadvantage), less stable cargo arrangement (though, on a beach cruiser, that's less of a problem than on a dedicated road bike or touring set-up), and more prone to flats (more surface area on the tires, and the weight isn't distributed quite as well as a road or touring bike).

    I like it, but it's not for everyone. It's just how I do things.

  3. #83
    I Learn So Others Can Too FireInMyBones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtndragon View Post
    I have a cross bike that I use for road touring and bikepacking. Of those two bikes listed, I think you would have the most fun touring on the Cannondale because it has a triple crank...

    ...When I tour, I use 40c tires, which barely fit in my frame. You can tour on any bike really with bikepacking gear as none of it needs rack braze ons to mount the load, but the two factors I would weigh most highly are tire size the frame will accept and gearing. Good luck.
    I would get the compact double as I never use the small gear even on tough hills with my Mtn. Bike. I'm glad to hear I could use the knobbier tires with the road bike for some touring.

    Quote Originally Posted by FLRider View Post
    I prefer to have my lower back be happy with me over my seat being happy with me after a long ride.
    Interesting. I guess it's different strokes for different folks. I can hardly be on a bike anymore without leaning over. Being more upright is one of the reasons I find my Mtn. Bike so much less comfortable than my old road bike (that I shouldn't have sold).
    -Jeremy

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    Quote Originally Posted by FLRider View Post
    FireInMyBones; he's a mountain goat crossed with a marathoner.
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  4. #84
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    I also support the cyclocross type frame idea. They aren't perfect, but they are the closest to the needs you cite. These days there is a trend for more frame versatility, vs specialization, but it's still a recent trend in the industry. An example of such a frame is Surly's "Cross Check" and Soma Fabrication's "Double Cross."

    There isn't a 'do everything' bike that will 'do everything' well. The reasons are many, too many to list all of them.

    If you race, you'd probably use 20c – 22c tires because of their low friction coefficient, which require specific rim widths that can't mount fat tires (32c - 40c) designed for hauling and vibration resistance. Huge problem. Also, racing/racing-hybrid bikes aren't designed to carry much weight or position a rider in an (more) upright position; they are designed to position a rider in a racing position and sacrifice almost all durability for weight reduction. Can they carry a rider plus weight? Yea, but not much. On the other hand, if you want a bike designed to haul loads (even sub 25lb loads); these types of bikes position riders in a more upright position which increases wind resistance. Another thought, carbon fiber is a great composite (lite and stiff = excellent control) if used in controlled conditions like a criterium race where the likelihood of rocks flying up and hitting the frame isn't much of a problem. It's important to understand that carbon fiber has a tendency to splinter if struck hard enough. Once a CF frame begins to splinter, it will fail quickly. This is exactly why steel is the preferred material for touring bikes; it has a slow fail, it flexes, and it withstands impacts from road debris well (because it flexes). If need be, steel can also be bent back into position with the correct tools and knowhow. If you travel via bike, rocks will hit your frame. Lastly, fenders matter! You want a frame that can incorporate fenders to protect the bike from road crap.

    Gearing only works in certain tooth count ratios. If you need to climb and are carrying a load, you will need a granny ring, sub 24 teeth. 42 / 32 / 24 is a common long distance ratio. You could drop the large ring and only go with the 32 / 24 ratio, but then you sacrifice flat land speed acquired by the 42 tooth chain ring.
    Last edited by pulsemod; 07-02-2012 at 13:18.

  5. #85
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    If you are touring, a low center of gravity is desireable, especially with gear. Unfortunately (cyclo) cross bikes and mountain bikes tend to have higher center brackets, the opposite of what is better.

    No question of steel for touring. Not just about comfort, cost, reparability, etc; its about toughness. Racks and the loads on them place a surprising shock load on bike tubing, whether front forks or rear triangle members. Much more burdensome than a rider heavier by the same amount.

  6. #86
    Member pebbles's Avatar
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    100_0607.jpg Thought I'd show you my set up. BoB trailer with RubberMaid 18 gal (I think) roughneck bin. Plenty of room for gear on my 2011 Xcountry trip, plus completely waterproof.

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    How do you like the BoB trailer? I bought a cheap 2 wheeled trailer and no matter what I have in it it feels like Im dragging an extra 50 lbs.
    Pete.
    The opinions expressed by this user are not those of a competent individual. If they were that would mean I know what I am talking about.

  8. #88
    Member pebbles's Avatar
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    I like the BoB for very extended trips, like I said this was a X country ride. For anything less than 2 weeks I stick with my rear rack and panniers. On another note Trialers expecially the BoB trailer take some amount of getting used to. not for the drag but it seems to almost rock the bike as you pedal, if only in the slightest. It really does hold a ton of gear and stresses the frame less, thats why i like it

  9. #89
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    I know this may not be the right place to ask, but I've come to trust the HF community.

    I currently have this bike: http://www.bikepedia.com/quickbike/B...erra&Type=bike

    I would like to use it to ride on the local rails to trails paths and on some roads (mostly paved, but some are gravel). My plan is to start with some new, thinner tires and to ditch the front suspension for a new fixed fork (it's shot). I have no idea what kind of forks to be looking at, but that's the plan.

    Does this sound reasonable? Would I be able to put panniers and on this bicycle and carry a light load? My goal is to work up to riding the Munger Trail that goes from Duluth, MN to Hinckley, MN next fall (63 miles each way). I will for sure be looking at camping with my hammock along the way, but it won't be more than a 3 day trip.

    I'm new to anything other than casual riding as a boy. I got this bike almost 10 years ago and have ridden it up and down the road every once in awhile, but I want to get more into riding for fitness and fun.

    I really can't justify a new, quality machine at this point. Maybe next year.
    If your lucky enough to be outdoors, your lucky enough!


  10. #90
    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AScott View Post
    I know this may not be the right place to ask, but I've come to trust the HF community.

    I currently have this bike: http://www.bikepedia.com/quickbike/B...erra&Type=bike

    I would like to use it to ride on the local rails to trails paths and on some roads (mostly paved, but some are gravel). My plan is to start with some new, thinner tires and to ditch the front suspension for a new fixed fork (it's shot). I have no idea what kind of forks to be looking at, but that's the plan.

    Does this sound reasonable? Would I be able to put panniers and on this bicycle and carry a light load? My goal is to work up to riding the Munger Trail that goes from Duluth, MN to Hinckley, MN next fall (63 miles each way). I will for sure be looking at camping with my hammock along the way, but it won't be more than a 3 day trip.

    I'm new to anything other than casual riding as a boy. I got this bike almost 10 years ago and have ridden it up and down the road every once in awhile, but I want to get more into riding for fitness and fun.

    I really can't justify a new, quality machine at this point. Maybe next year.
    Sure, that'd do just fine for short (less than 40 miles a day) trips. Adding panniers to it is...odd, but doable. I'd be careful of what tires you put on it, though; gravel can be tough to ride on with road tires, depending on the subgrade. Personally, I'd take it in to a reputable local shop and talk with them about what you want to do.

    If you know anyone in your local area who bikes on a regular basis (I mean touring or mountain biking or racing, not just around town), ask them where they get their bike serviced and what their impression of the place is. That should lead you to some good folks who really know bikes and are willing to work with you on what you want.

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