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  1. #1
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    Blackbird + tarp combo decision

    Hello All,

    My first post, woho.

    I've been reading through pages and pages of sites and forums over the past month or so.
    After all my reading I've deduced that I want to get a WBBB, surprise, surprise..
    The only 2x options I was really looking at were either the WBBB or Mosquito hammock. Claytor Mosquito hammock looks great to have in summer here, in Sydney Australia, though I like lot of the features on the WBBB.
    Anyhow- so assuming I get the WBBB. I now need to purchase a rain-fly.
    After more reading, Im looking towards the larger tarps that can be used for a cooking/relaxing area and will keep well dry in windy/ torrential rainy conditions. (so not looking at the diamonds - as have read they don't cope in windy rain very well).

    Couple questions:
    Have been looking at the Hennessy -Hex Rainfly 70D Polyester $59 -
    Dimensions: Size 144" on centerline x 120" wide hexagonal shape/
    12' x 10' Weight: 18.6 oz / 530 g

    Hex Rainfly 30D Sylnylon $130 -
    Dimensions: Size 144" on centerline x 120" wide hexagonal shape

    http://hennessyhammock.com/catalog/p...70d_polyester/

    Can anyone tell me the difference between the pros/cons Polyester vs synylon, other than price and 100grams difference?

    Also, I watched a few reviews and seen another post on hennessy Hex tarp with the 'rain funnel attachment'. - which I rekon is a really cool idea. Can't seem to find it on their website anymore, but a DIY rain funnel would not be hard to make. (some people think its gimmicky- but I rekon is a very good idea in aussie climates) with torrential rain, then long dry spells with little water.

    Another Tarp I've been considering is the basic:

    BIG RAIN FLY (3x4m.) from http://www.mosquitohammock.com/ --Dimensions: Rectangle shape - 300cm wide x 400 long (9' 9" wide x 13' long). Weight: 1.0kg. (2lb.)
    COST: US$60.


    Anyone suggestions would be appreciated?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Bubba's Avatar
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    May 2010
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    G'day and welcome!
    Since you will be getting a WBBB anyways, how about getting a WB tarp and save some shipping? (Unless they are backordered-I have not checked the WB site recently)
    With reagards to the silnylon vs polyester, I thinks its primarily weight and bulk savings for backpacking.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  3. #3
    dant8ro's Avatar
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    Jul 2010
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    Yup, bubbas got this one nailed. The Sil Nylon will be lighter and pack smaller. I own a WB Big Mamajamba and think Its a great tarp. I think for 130$ you can do better from any of the HF vendors!

    Dan.

  4. #4
    gunner76's Avatar
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    Dec 2009
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    Beaufort, NC
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    I have a Mosquito Hammock camo rain fly (same size as the large). I use it for overnight trips when I do not expect bad weather as I considered its coverage to be minimal. Other than that its a nice tarp and I love the camo.

    If you are getting a BB go ahead and get the BMJ, its a realy nice tarp, wieghts less and gives you more coverage. Cost more tho.

    Pictures are of a Gear Guide tarp, Mosquito Camo Tarp and a BMJ for comparison.

    The Gear Guide tarp is massive and heavy at 2 pounds. The BMJ looks small at first but if you look at the images you will see that it gives better coverage IMO. You can also get door kits for the BJM for even better protection against rain/snow
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    Warbonnet BB 1.7 and a whole lot of other great gear from the vendors on HF

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunner76 View Post
    I have a Mosquito Hammock camo rain fly (same size as the large). I use it for overnight trips when I do not expect bad weather as I considered its coverage to be minimal. Other than that its a nice tarp and I love the camo.

    If you are getting a BB go ahead and get the BMJ, its a realy nice tarp, wieghts less and gives you more coverage. Cost more tho.

    Pictures are of a Gear Guide tarp, Mosquito Camo Tarp and a BMJ for comparison.

    The Gear Guide tarp is massive and heavy at 2 pounds. The BMJ looks small at first but if you look at the images you will see that it gives better coverage IMO. You can also get door kits for the BJM for even better protection against rain/snow
    Hey All, thanks for the responses.
    From all comments above, looks like for $130 Big Mamma is a good possibility. I like the extra tie-down options in the middle of the tarp also.

    Im finding it a bit hard to reason why I would get BMJ @ 132"x120" 3.3528m x 3.048m for $130 when I can get a larger tarp BIG RAIN FLY (3x4m.) for $60

    Im not overly concerned about the weight, I will be rucking for fitness, training. I guess Im looking for a tarp made from tough material, so wont rip easily, can withstand some close heat (not melt real easy) if say 3-4m from a small campfire and not weight a tonne, but doesn't have to be feather light either.

    Is there any particular reason anyone wouldn't go with a cheaper, large Hennessy Hex tarp over a BB tarp, for a BB?

    Any advantages of the BJM shape over the $60 rectangle tarp?

    Im just a bit wary about prices coz I've been purchasing loads of gear recently.. including surplus US MSS, Alice pack LC-1, Exped down mat 7, para-cord and loads of other stuff & have loads more to buy to rig out my kit.

  6. #6
    Senior Member bwg's Avatar
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    Hi --

    I own the Big Mamajamba, the Hennessy Hex rain fly, and the mosquitohammock diamond rain fly. The diamond rain fly is long but when strong wind with rain blows my hammock tends to get wet on the ends. I had to add some tie downs on the sides to help keep that tarp from billowing up and down. The mamajamba and Hennessy hex are very similar in size and design except for material. If weight is not a concern, the Hennessy hex is well designed and well priced. One can save 5 to 8oz with the mamajamba. When I backpack or bicycle tour I tend to rotate between these two tarps. I like both.

    The big rain fly I would not recommend. While it may seem that a longer tarp would be advantageous, I have found the opposite to be true. If one has to hang a hammock between two trees that are 15 feet or longer apart, I have found that it is difficult to get longer tarps close to the hammock body. This is important in strong storms because the closer the tarp to the top of the hammock, the more rain protection offered. If the hammock ridgeline is 1.5 or 2+ feet below the tarp, then it is possible for the tarp to billow in wind thus allowing rain underneath. If the tarp is long enough to create doors on the end, then that would be helpful, but a long ridgeline on the tarp may make this difficult.

    In short, if you buy a tarp without doors, I recommend a tarp that is about 2 to 3 feet longer than the hammock (1 to 1.5 feet on each end). If you buy a tarp with doors, it can be longer, although better fitting tarps will still provide more protection.

    The new Hennessy monsoon and typhoons may also be worth considering. This fellow has posted three videos of the typhoon tarp with a warbonnet blackbird:

    http://www.youtube.com/user/Justaguyinnc

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwg View Post
    Hi --

    I own the Big Mamajamba, the Hennessy Hex rain fly, and the mosquitohammock diamond rain fly. The diamond rain fly is long but when strong wind with rain blows my hammock tends to get wet on the ends. I had to add some tie downs on the sides to help keep that tarp from billowing up and down. The mamajamba and Hennessy hex are very similar in size and design except for material. If weight is not a concern, the Hennessy hex is well designed and well priced. One can save 5 to 8oz with the mamajamba. When I backpack or bicycle tour I tend to rotate between these two tarps. I like both.

    The big rain fly I would not recommend. While it may seem that a longer tarp would be advantageous, I have found the opposite to be true. If one has to hang a hammock between two trees that are 15 feet or longer apart, I have found that it is difficult to get longer tarps close to the hammock body. This is important in strong storms because the closer the tarp to the top of the hammock, the more rain protection offered. If the hammock ridgeline is 1.5 or 2+ feet below the tarp, then it is possible for the tarp to billow in wind thus allowing rain underneath. If the tarp is long enough to create doors on the end, then that would be helpful, but a long ridgeline on the tarp may make this difficult.

    In short, if you buy a tarp without doors, I recommend a tarp that is about 2 to 3 feet longer than the hammock (1 to 1.5 feet on each end). If you buy a tarp with doors, it can be longer, although better fitting tarps will still provide more protection.

    The new Hennessy monsoon and typhoons may also be worth considering. This fellow has posted three videos of the typhoon tarp with a warbonnet blackbird:

    http://www.youtube.com/user/Justaguyinnc
    I watched quite a few of that guys youtube vids. Its the first positive one I've seen from him about the WBBB. He did a previous review of the 1.7 complaining about the ventilation.
    I saw a similar review from him on that same tarp with a mosquito hammock lol. I was looking at the Typoon also. Thanks for posting.


    EDIT: Sorry was running for work - so didn't get to write much/ think about details.

    Good point you raised there about the 'billowing factor' and tarp being closer to the hammock & doors etc.
    Now I can see, from the Photos of the MJB - how its shape would actually hug the hammock more than a regular rectangle - and can imagine a rectangle making almost a 'wind tunnel' now that you mention it.

    Perhaps it might be worth for me to take a spare 'tarp' when im camping, so i have a larger area just for general sun cover.
    Having a 2 in 1 tarp would be good also. So, eg. having BMJ, instead of a Typoon and Big tarp- but saying that 75 Typoon cover +60 Big tarp = $135 is still cheaper than $210 for BMJ with doorkit.

    The Typhoon tarp looks great and during heavy, flooding rain we weather we had in NSW this week- imagine myself inside one of them in an emergency situation in the wilderness.
    After thinking about it, if I really wanted to keep dry - tarp with the doorkit is the best option.

    Typoon
    - from what I've seen in the vid by 'justaguy' BB1.1 is compatible with this tarp. Looks promising- reasonable price also.
    I was considering getting the WBBB 1.7 - im about 175cm 200lb, didnt think 1.1 / 1.7 would make that much difference?
    Wonder if the 1.7 would fit in the Typoon?

    Monsoon - have not seen any reviews with BB for this tarp. The shape of this tarp looks bit better for collecting rain water.
    The Silnylon version of the Monsoon is 10 cheaper than the Typoon- As for versatility. Monsoon looks possibly - more versatile than the Typoon

    BMJ - as above everyone loves this one. With doorkit. Look like it total to $210 for the setup (including doorkit) though.
    (Mamajamba w/panel pulls: camo) $135 , BMJ doorkit - $75


    Summary - Monsoon and Typoon are attractive to me, as doorkits come with them for under $100 bucks!
    BMJ - 75 for just the doorkit ..think is marked up a bit too high.
    Last edited by camper_guy; 05-31-2011 at 05:46.

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