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  1. #11

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    I don't think the MacCat is long enough for the Claytor Jungle hammock. You need about 13 feet for good coverage. That's the length on his regular diamond shaped tarp.

    Is the wind really that big of a factor with a rectangular tarp compared to a diamond tarp. Does it make a difference if you stake it tight along side the hammock?

    Miguel

  2. #12
    Senior Member
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    I have been through some rain, wind, and snow in my McCat too. Jeff has something on his website about serviving a hurricane of snow in the McCat. I faired ok with the HH standard tarp, but don't have the skills needed to use it in a lot of rain.

    Correct me if I am wrong, but I think the tarp orientation has more to do with wind resistance than the shape. I think that as long as you are perpendicular to the wind, most tarps will work. Provided they are made well. I think if pitched right the square on diagonal, rectangle, and cat cut tarp will perform similar.

    The Speer Hammocks come standard with a rectanglar tarp. After talking with Ed at a Campout this fall I don't think he would sell anything that he didn't think would work.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  3. #13
    slowhike's Avatar
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    i believe you`r right about the rectangle tarps HH. the first thing to remember when choosing a camp site, especially when much wind is involved, is location. and then orientation of the two trees you choose.
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  4. #14
    Peter_pan's Avatar
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    Oct 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miguel View Post
    I don't think the MacCat is long enough for the Claytor Jungle hammock. You need about 13 feet for good coverage. That's the length on his regular diamond shaped tarp.

    Is the wind really that big of a factor with a rectangular tarp compared to a diamond tarp. Does it make a difference if you stake it tight along side the hammock?

    Miguel
    I'm not sure that I buy the length arguement on the TC JH.... Sure it comes with a 13 footer, but real narrow on the ends as it is a diamond not a square....you could easily get the same coverage, actually more , with a standard 8x10 hung asym or 1/2 asym.

    Pan
    Ounces to Grams.

    www.jacksrbetter.com ... Largest supplier of camping quilts and under quilts...Home of the Original Nest Under Quilt, and Bear Mountain Bridge Hammock. 800 595 0413

  5. #15
    Senior Member Seeker's Avatar
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    i've got a homemade 8 x 10 that i use occassionally. i try to hang the hammock north/south, with the long side of the tarp perpendicular to the wind, as mentioned. i've got longer tie outs on one side (away from the wind, so i can prop that end up with a stick) and shorter ones on the other side, so i can just tie them closer to the ground. this makes sort of a lean-to shape, and seems to work pretty well.

    oh. my hammock is a HH ULB-Asym. i don't know the exact length, but the 10' tarp overlaps its ends by a foot or so. that's plenty. if the wind shifts and rain comes more from the north or south than due west, you just shift the tarp toward that direction a few inches. that's one of the things i love about the stock hammock being tied right to the tie outs.... you just slide it. no re-tying involved. someone mentioned that they use a similar system of prussick knots on what amounts to a ridgeline cord, and they can easily slide their 8 x 10 tarp back and forth. this would allow you to tie the tarp independently, below the hammock tie-outs, so when you got in, the tarp wouldn't sag, and still maintain the ability to slide it.

  6. #16
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
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    I have some silnylon from Walmarts's $1 bin. It's 64 inches wide. I have been thinking about joining 2 ~12 foot pieces together to make a 10X12 tarp. Right now my Gear Guide tarp is one of the heaviest components of my sleep system. I had been wondering how well a 10X12 retangular would work. I think I will go ahead and make one now.

    Anybody know about what a 10x12 silnylon tarp would weigh?

  7. #17
    I have used a homemade 10x10 pitched as a A-frame in some pretty high winds. Under those conditions I use all the staking points on the tarp to help distribute the load (sticks as stakes work fine), and if necessary put rocks or deadfall branches on top of the stakes. Obviously a taut pitch and a sheltered location are key.

  8. #18
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
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    I am now leaning toward making a 10x10 tarp with the silnylon I mentioned above, basically joining 2 5x10 pieces. The seam would be parallel to the sides instead of running diagonally like on most tarps. This would be fine if I were pitching it as a square tarp, with the seam as the ridge line. I'm not sure if 10' will give me enough coverage on the ends of my hammock.

    If I pitched it diagonally the seam would be running across the tarp, not on the ridgeline. Will this cause problems? Should a tarp be pitched so that the seam runs across the ridge line?

  9. #19

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    "i've got longer tie outs on one side (away from the wind, so i can prop that end up with a stick) and shorter ones on the other side, so i can just tie them closer to the ground. this makes sort of a lean-to shape"


    That makes sense. I'm going to test my tarp the next time the winds come up. It seems like that for all practical purposes if you're hanging in the woods or a grove of trees, you're going to be fairly sheltered from the wind anyway. I suppose it's a much greater issue for a thru hiker who's odds of experiencing high winds and other nasty weather are much greater than a weekend warrior such as myself.

    Having said that....I once had a tent demolished in high winds while camping in the Great Plains of the mid west. It was flat as a pancake with nary a tree in site. Speaking of flat as a pancake.....so was the tent! I'm sure a hammock would have fared better...really.

    Miguel

  10. #20
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    I like having my tarp about 2-3 feet longer than my hammock, but I am weird about getting wet.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

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