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  1. #11
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catavarie View Post
    While I can't speak for the White Mountains in particular I can lend some answers to the general questions.

    Yes Hammocks are more comfortable than sleeping on the ground in a tent, any day. YMMV

    If you want to use the CCF pad, you'd probably find it better to go with a double layer hammock so that pad can sit between the layers and you're not sliding around on it throughout the night. (A problem for some with pads in hammocks.) This is why under quits (UQ) are prefered by most hammockers.

    As for location. Any 2 trees 10 - 15 feet apart is ideal to camp in a hammock. No need to find a "flat, level" spot. You don't have to clear the sight of debris. Time saved finding and preping a campsite means more time spent on the trail. Above treeline you can use your hammock as a bivy, but after sleeping suspended above the ground I'm sure you'd make the effort to get down to treeline in time to make camp.

    Your pack can go on the ground under your tarp. Even in the rain the ground under the tarp dries out surprisingly quickly. Or you can use a biner to clip your pack to the hammock suspension under the tarp.

    In a bottom entry hammock you can hang your shoes out of the entry/exit hole by tying the laces to the hammock's ridgeline. Keeps them off the ground so they can air/dry out and they are convenient for when you're exiting the hammock.

    As for mosquitos, there have been no confirmed incidents, that I'm aware of, of people being bitten through any hammock material. Although some people claim to have been bitten at night through the netting if their arm or leg is resting directly against it, but the same could happen in a tent.

    All good points, except the last IMO. If you will take my word for it, here is your confirmation.

    My friend who got me into hammocks- but who never comes to this site for some reason- got his a*s chewed up on rainy night in SC. I think he was in a single layer HH Expedition, but it could have been another one of his "parachute" hammocks as he calls them. But, all single layer. Also, I don't know what else he was wearing for clothing, but it was a hot summer SC night, and he was inside the netting, so probably not much. Maybe just a pair of shorts, or maybe even just his underwear, don't know. But the next morning he discovered his behind was a pincushion.

    I figure bites are rare, because most people, most of the time, either have a pad, or a HHSS at least the UC part, or at least some minimal summer UQ, and if none of that most of the rest have a dbl layer hammock. Any of that naturally makes bites through the hammock virtually impossible. I suspect so would sleeping in the right clothing.

    But a hot night, with minimal clothing and a single layer hammock, it might be a good idea to treat the hammock exterior with Permethrin. Although, some hammock materials resist mossies more than others, even with single layers. I have heard that rumored about the HH ULBP and Explorer UL, for example. I'd have to hear more confirmation of the rumor though, before I would risk it. I don't need no West Nile Fever!

    Quote Originally Posted by jraffini View Post
    The idea that a hammock set up is more expensive than a tent set up is a bit misleading. You can spend more on a high end hammock insulation set up than you would on a budget tent insulation set up, but that's not comparing apples to apples. A sleeping bag and pad that you would use on the ground will keep you warm in a hammock as well. You can spend big bucks on an underquilt that will increase your comfort in the hammock, but won't necessarily be warmer than a pad set up. You can spend well over a hundred dollars on a ground pad too if you wanted to. The reason people think it's more expensive is because you can't go to wally world or ****'s and pick up an underquilt like you can a pad. If you've got a bag and pad that keep you warm on the ground, they'll keep you warm in your hammock. As far as a tarp goes, if you go with a hennesy, the tarp is included in the package. IT's a minimal coverage tarp that won't give you tons of coverage, but you aren't going to have a mansion with an ultralight tent either. Also, as it's already been suggested, there are tons of diy options. It's pretty hard to put together your own tent. Check out shug's videos, continue to search the forums here, and you won't regret your decision to hang. Have a good time!!
    Here is one weight/volume/expense advantage to the hammock that I find people often forget: no need for cushioning with the hammock. Now I realize that there are some hard guys and gals out there who can sleep on hard rocky ground with just a thin CCF pad and be happy. But a LOT of us are like me: every year that goes by, I need a thicker, inflatable super cushy pad to make life on the trail tolerable. And the worse the rocks and roots, the more I need. These pads are never light. If they are light, then they are not cushy enough for my candy a*s self. At age 18 I could take anything. At 35 I was able to get through 30 days on a NOLS trip with just a thick CCF pad. But, I was longing for my inflatable Thermarest the entire time. Now at 62, just forget all of that. I'd probably have to stay home.

    But in a hammock, all you need out of a pad is insulation. You do not need cushioning. And a much thinner, lighter and cheaper CCF pad will insulate as well as a thicker, heavier inflatable. And what if it is really warm(lows guaranteed above 70-75), how much pad do you need? NADA! So under the right circumstances, we who need thick inflatable pads on the ground can now go to zero pad weight. Assuming you are willing to go without a pad for emergency ground use or a sit by the fire pad. Under all circumstances, I can get by with a much lighter pad. Or, maybe no pad other than sit pad and just 6-8 oz worth of IX UQ!

    So what does that outlook do to weight and volume and maybe even cost comparisons?

    But anyway Luisdent, basically if you can use it on the ground you can use it in a hammock, with a bit of learning curve. If you are a tarp/bivy type of guy, Just think in terms of the tarp, pad and top quilt are the same( unless you are using a full bag, in which case going to just a TQ will again save you some weight. TQs cover you better in hammocks than on the ground). You will just use all of those in your hammock. Think of the hammock as replacing the bivy. Think of it as a bivy that is hung from the trees off of the ground. And if you are forced to ground, you will just use that bivy(hammock) on the ground, still under the tarp and still on the pad.
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 06-18-2011 at 11:47.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  2. #12
    Senior Member Beast 71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by luisdent View Post
    1) I have a 35-degree ems velocity sleeping bag and a closed cell pad. I will be in NH white mountains 3-seasons. Will these keep me warm in a hennesy hammock?? How warm vs a tent in these conditions?
    You should be plenty warm with your pad and sleeping bag. Two considerations though; If you want to use a pad I STRONGLY recommend a double layered hammock to keep your pad in place. Also, get the best hammock and tarp that you can afford right now and make do with the insulation that you already own. You can always upgrade to quilts in the future if you care to.

  3. #13
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    Thanks for all the quick replies. :-)

    I'd love to make my own, but I don't have a sewing machine or stores with the fabric... I also wouldn't want it to end up being lower quality build and fall apart. I've read a few sites on making your own, but how do the materials and build compare to say a hennesy hammock?

    If I went with hennesy I'd at least get the hex tarp. The stock tarp looks pretty small at the ends of the hammock. I'd want good rain coverage also extending to cover my pack if I hung it on the ridge line.

    As for tents, I've never had an issue in heavy downpour. It seems to me that if you setup on the proper grade with a ground tarp properly setup under the tent you don't have any issues. Perhaps this isn't always possible, but so far I've always had a spot. The issue is the time it takes to find it. I'd rather spend 30 minutes than 2 hours finding a spot...

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shug View Post
    There is quite a bit to consider and learn but I did a video series to short-cut it some. Hammock How-To
    It might help you out some but be prepared to get a buttocks-load of me....
    Shug
    Haha. yeah, i've watched some of your videos, watching the rest now. You remind me of ernest when you starting talking like a military commander hehe

  5. #15
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by luisdent View Post
    Thanks for all the quick replies. :-)

    I'd love to make my own, but I don't have a sewing machine or stores with the fabric... I also wouldn't want it to end up being lower quality build and fall apart. I've read a few sites on making your own, but how do the materials and build compare to say a hennesy hammock?

    If I went with hennesy I'd at least get the hex tarp. The stock tarp looks pretty small at the ends of the hammock. I'd want good rain coverage also extending to cover my pack if I hung it on the ridge line.

    As for tents, I've never had an issue in heavy downpour. It seems to me that if you setup on the proper grade with a ground tarp properly setup under the tent you don't have any issues. Perhaps this isn't always possible, but so far I've always had a spot. The issue is the time it takes to find it. I'd rather spend 30 minutes than 2 hours finding a spot...
    Oh yeah, there is yet another thing you don't really need to carry: a ground cloth.

    Sometimes, due to widow makers(trees or branches above), trying to find 2 trees of appropriate size and distance with out another sapling in between, without poison ivy vines down here in the south, not to mention trying to find this either in a not so exposed sight or near the tenters you are hiking with- well, suffice it to say that finding trees can sometimes be as hard as finding flat, root/rock free ground with good drainage. However, I still almost always can find something unless I am above timberline. I'm not at all sure that- in the areas where I oft hike- that I can always find a good spot for a tent, when not in a developed camp ground.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  6. #16
    Randy's Avatar
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    I have made several diy hammocks now, have numerous store bought hammocks
    but my favorites are my Hennessys. I dont own an under quilt and dont intend to.
    Although in Texas I have slept in the 20s and high teens with out an UQ.
    If you decide on a Hennessy.. the zipper models are a favorite.....
    "Proud Pound Hawg"
    Republic of Texas H.O.G. (Hennessy Owners Group)

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by luisdent View Post
    Thanks for all the quick replies. :-)

    As for tents, I've never had an issue in heavy downpour. It seems to me that if you setup on the proper grade with a ground tarp properly setup under the tent you don't have any issues. Perhaps this isn't always possible, but so far I've always had a spot. The issue is the time it takes to find it. I'd rather spend 30 minutes than 2 hours finding a spot...
    Luisdent,

    One of the benefits of hammocking, is that you don't need to find a level or rockless spot. There are reports of people sleeping over a creek, on a 45* hillside or even up against a cliff. For example, you could do like the climbing crowd and put your hammock up between large rocks (assuming that your straps would go around and the rock doesn't move) or a couple of cams or nut stoppers into a crack/hole. Or maybe you put one end on a tree and another into the cliff?

    When you hammock in the rain, you take 3 or 5 minutes to throw up your tarp, then set your hammock up under it (while you're out of the rain).

    Here is a thread to read for an idea on costs: http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...ead.php?t=8921

    You could actually go cheap on a tarp and expensive on a hammock, or vice versa. You definitely want a double bottom if you're going to be using a cheap pad. You could get a WallyWorld pad for $6 and stick it between the double bottom layers. You can get a nice Hennessy with tarp for $200, but most people are going to buy the upgraded tarp with the Hennessy to get the extra coverage (customize option on their website). Many people prefer the zipper.

    I'd recommend looking at under $300, as it will significantly broaden your perspective on what you can get. A great tarp will be around $100 to $130. A good hammock will run you around $150 to $200. If you only buy once, you'll save money in the long run...

  8. #18
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    A tent/tarp is superior to a hammock in all ways EXCEPT comfort. A tent/tarp is cheaper, warmer, lighter, more roomy, better weather protection, etc.

    I know this is a hammock forum, and we're all supposed to gush about all things hammock, but I feel sometimes we get carried away.

    Hammocks are different. New issues to work through - just something different. And that "fiddling" is a lot of fun. And I can set up my hammock in the backyard without cleaning up after the dogs first

    I've done a fair amount of backpacking over the years and the only reason I went to a hammock was for comfort. I'm getting old and the ground is getting harder.

  9. #19
    Senior Member SteelerNation's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dla View Post
    A tent/tarp is superior to a hammock in all ways EXCEPT comfort. A tent/tarp is cheaper, warmer, lighter, more roomy, better weather protection, etc.

    I know this is a hammock forum, and we're all supposed to gush about all things hammock, but I feel sometimes we get carried away.

    Hammocks are different. New issues to work through - just something different. And that "fiddling" is a lot of fun. And I can set up my hammock in the backyard without cleaning up after the dogs first

    I've done a fair amount of backpacking over the years and the only reason I went to a hammock was for comfort. I'm getting old and the ground is getting harder.
    Well, not to be argumentative, but I spent a lot of years as a tent camper, and I will say that my current ZPacks CF Tarp is roomier, lighter and offers just as good weather protection as my tents ever did. By the way, lots and lots lighter

    There is definitely a learning curve, and I did spend some coin on my super-lightweight stuff, but I just hate to see generalizations of any kind. I do agree that I've experienced the fiddle-factor though

    Definitely love being off of the ground, though.

    Enjoy!

    SN
    Please visit my AmJustDuane YouTube channel

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteelerNation View Post
    Well, not to be argumentative, but I spent a lot of years as a tent camper, and I will say that my current ZPacks CF Tarp is roomier, lighter and offers just as good weather protection as my tents ever did. By the way, lots and lots lighter

    There is definitely a learning curve, and I did spend some coin on my super-lightweight stuff, but I just hate to see generalizations of any kind. I do agree that I've experienced the fiddle-factor though

    Definitely love being off of the ground, though.

    Enjoy!

    SN
    When the wind is blowing like crazy and it is just flat cold, pretty hard to beat a tent. You can get some tent-like tarps for the hammock - but it will never seal up like a tent.

    Now I'm coming at this as someone who has always lived north of the 45th parallel. If I lived by the equator, where cold is a non-issue and the concern is creepy crawlies, then a hammock all the way!

    My sil-nylon tarp, A16 bug bivy, tyvek ground cloth, Z-rest, and mummy bag are sitting in the gear closet now. Replaced them with a WBBB dbl 1.7, 3 season Long/Wide Black Mamba, 3 season Incubator and a Big MambaJamba tarp. I'm carrying more weight. It cost a small fortune for all that down. But man it sure is comfy!

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