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  1. #1
    New Member Mockingbird's Avatar
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    Need Constructive Criticism

    Hi Gang! I'm a newbie at hammocking, and just received my OES MacCat Deluxe (silnylon) with a single panel pull-out on each side and sewn-on doors by 2QZQ (both highly recommended!)...I've enclosed some photos of my first official hang with it (used a continual ridge line), and would like some constructive criticism.

    A couple of questions:

    1) How long should the "drip line" for rain water runoff be (see extra orange line in pic)?
    2) I'm taking this tarp on an AT thru-hike next year: since I'm new to this, is it best to just stick with the stock webbing or is it lighter/less fiddle factor to go tree huggers-whoopie slings?
    3) (Adding to #2) Is it lighter/less fiddle factor to use a continual ridge line or two separate lines?
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Mockingbird

  2. #2
    Senior Member Diab's Avatar
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    1. I'm not sure, but someone definitely will.
    2. That's really a matter of personal opinion. Try whoopies and see if you like them.
    3. I'm also not sure, but somebody will be able to help you with that.

    Finally, I noticed you tied a back up knot for your cinch buckles. With those cinch buckles, a backup is no longer required, and in fact, I am pretty sure it is discouraged. Something about damaging the webbing I think. I realize this post may not have been very helpful, but I just thought I would toss in my 2 cents.

    EDIT: Oh, and with the MacCat, I am pretty sure you don't need a continuous ridgeline. You can have a line coming from either end. And for ease of use, instead of tying all those knots for your tarp, you can look into getting some tarp flyz from Dutch. They really cut down on the setup time and they weigh next to nothing. Plus they are made out of titanium, which is just cool.

  3. #3
    Bubba's Avatar
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    Set up looks pretty good.

    I love the little bridge in the first picture.

    Drip lines don't need to be long at all, even just six inches would be enough.

    The cinch buckles in the second pic do not need a half hitch to prevent slipping.

    To attach your tarp to your continuous ridgeline, make a couple of fixed loops either by splicing or using a double fisherman's knot and make a couple of prusik knots. You can then attach your tarp's D ring to the prusiks with small carabiners. The prusiks slide easily but under tension will grab the continuous ridgeline. This will allow you to centre your tarp over your hammock more easily and you can get a nice taut pitch. If the prusiks on both ends of the tarp are pulled tight enough, the continuous ridgeline under the tarp will loosen a bit and you have a place to hang stuff like wet clothing.

    Whoopies and webbing are less bulky and a tiny bit lighter but it seems to be personal preference really. IMO the suspension you have there is as simple as you can get.
    Last edited by Bubba; 06-19-2011 at 21:18. Reason: added info
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  4. #4
    Senior Member shumway's Avatar
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    I second the prussik suggestion. If you don't want to use biners with them you can use small trail stick toggles. Stick the prussik loop through the tarp loop, then hold it in place with your toggle. Leave the prussiks attached to the line when you take it down. No need to keep retying them every set up.

    I think the drip lin length is not important. The objective is to provide the water a path of least resistance. It will stop flowing down your suspension once it hits the drip line, then follow the drip line downward. If you use a longer line, like almost to the ground, the drips are less likely to be blown toward your hammock if it's windy. I don't think that's a common issue though.
    Last edited by shumway; 06-19-2011 at 21:05. Reason: Speling mistakes

  5. #5
    mbiraman's Avatar
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    I'm partial to the ridge line kit whoopie slings sells. It comes with a continuous RL, a knot bone at one end and a small figure nine at the other. The tarp is attached to the RL via prussic knots at the D rings. With this you can set up the RL and then just slide the tarp where you want it and the RL kit is light weight, and NO knots.

    http://www.whoopieslings.com/Tarp_Lines.html
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  6. #6
    gargoyle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mockingbird View Post

    A couple of questions:

    1) How long should the "drip line" for rain water runoff be (see extra orange line in pic)?

    A couple inches is plenty, enough to allow gravity to work and pull the water downhill.
    For your hammock, the buckles and the webbing (hitched the way you got it) will work fine. If you have excess strap hanging down, just make an extra loop and tie it up out of the way, above the buckle. The buckle and the hitch act as a dripline.
    For the tarp ridge, the new tech line absorbs very little water (if any) and tends to not allow water to travel down. The d-ring/prussik connection will stop most any transfer.


    2) I'm taking this tarp on an AT thru-hike next year: since I'm new to this, is it best to just stick with the stock webbing or is it lighter/less fiddle factor to go tree huggers-whoopie slings?


    Congrats on your plans!
    Webbing and buckles is the simplest, less fiddley. Clip it to the tree, adjust and hang. Limited equipment and reliable and always attached to your hammock. Nothing to forget!

    Whoopies are only a few grams/oz. lighter, but involve tying the webbing to the tree, then tying a marlin spike hitch, insert a spike/toggle, then putting the whoopie on the spike/toggle, then adjusting the whoopie...more fiddle for the few grams/oz. you save. Extra steps after a long day on the trail.
    They are a little less bulky. And you gotta be extra diligent about removal. Lots of folks end up forgetting their straps, bad news when you just did 15 miles, and realize you left your straps behind.
    My opinion, stick with the stock straps and buckles, unless total UL is your goal. You got time to familarize yourself with either set up, and see whats best for you. Try to make it to a local group hang and check out the VARIOUS options. And get some hands on advice...and they're fun!



    3) (Adding to #2) Is it lighter/less fiddle factor to use a continual ridge line or two separate lines?
    I am partial to a continuous ridgeline. I prefer to run the line under the tarp. The prussik method works well here for attaching the tarp to the ridgeline. With the line under the tarp, you have a place to hang clothes for drying, even if it's raining out.
    The prussik acts as a dripline of sorts, diverting any water, and the d-ring acts as one too. Double safety factor againt drippage. (is that a word?)

    The prussiks allow you to slide the tarp left or right along the ridgeline for easy centering of the tarp between the trees.
    Prussiks are easy to make (there are several threads of how to) and take a few fiddly minutes to install the first time. After that, I leave everything attached (ridgeline, prussiks and tarp) as one unit.

    You can do two seperate lines with prussiks, still alows easy adjustments, but you loose the advantage of the clothesline, which is priceless for hanging the days sweaty clothes.
    Last edited by gargoyle; 06-19-2011 at 22:36.

  7. #7
    OutandBack's Avatar
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    Constructive Criticism

    Don't hang so close to the wee people. You might step on them as they are crossing their bridge.

    I like your setup. MAybe add a figure 9 to replace the knots in #3

  8. #8
    Whoooo Buddy)))) Shug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mockingbird View Post
    Hi Gang! I'm a newbie at hammocking, and just received my OES MacCat Deluxe (silnylon) with a single panel pull-out on each side and sewn-on doors by 2QZQ (both highly recommended!)...I've enclosed some photos of my first official hang with it (used a continual ridge line), and would like some constructive criticism.

    A couple of questions:

    1) How long should the "drip line" for rain water runoff be (see extra orange line in pic)?
    2) I'm taking this tarp on an AT thru-hike next year: since I'm new to this, is it best to just stick with the stock webbing or is it lighter/less fiddle factor to go tree huggers-whoopie slings?
    3) (Adding to #2) Is it lighter/less fiddle factor to use a continual ridge line or two separate lines?
    Hello there,
    Your set up looks very good.
    1) Drip line does not to be very long and you may not need one depending on how you rig. Your buckle and strap is under your tarp so you likely do not need to mess with a drip line. You can always throw a wet sock or bandana on if needed in a deluge.
    2) I like whoopies, marlinspike,toggle, straps. Less bulk in the pack. Lighter.
    3) I have done both....and both work well. Now I am back to two separate lines.
    I did a video series for new hangers...it may help you out in some places: Hammock Stuff
    Shug
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  9. #9

    Join Date
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    Nothing helpful, as you are way ahead of me,

    but is anyone else thinking Stonehenge from Spinaltap?

    jason

  10. #10
    New Member Mockingbird's Avatar
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    Thanks!!

    Thanks for your suggestions, everyone! I really appreciate it. I am going to try making my own continual ridge line like on whoopieslings.com, with the figure-9 on one end, knot bone on the other, and prusiks.

    I see you guys are really digging my waterfall! Here is a better picture of it (now it has some nice red mulch around it):
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Mockingbird

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