Page 3 of 18 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 172

Thread: Going Solo?

  1. #21
    Senior Member Yosef's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Charlotte, North Carolina
    Hammock
    Claytor JH or Eno DN
    Tarp
    Stock Claytor10x13
    Insulation
    CCF + 30 down bag
    Suspension
    Cinch buckle
    Posts
    181
    I used to have the same problem and would not sleep well b/c of how tense I was and would wake up and listen to everything. I don't know what made me change but I now feel very comfortable by myself in the woods. I do have a few theories though...

    First is just the pure odds of what there is to be scared of. On the east coast in reality there is just not that much to be scared of in terms of wildlife. Black bears are not viscous animals and if you take the proper precautions like hanging your food then you should be fine. Also sit down and listen to how much noise a squirrel can make, something small can sound much much bigger.

    Second is finding a camp site I am comfortable with. I don't mind camping around other campers as most every person I have ever met on the trail is friendly and harmless. I do prefer to be off the trail some and in an inconspicuous spot. For me it is just peace of mind.

    Third is taking solace in the fact that I have never known or heard of anyone I know that was hurt in the woods or met anyone or any animal that had any malicious effect on a hiker, and I believe most stories you read of a hiker and a bad animal encounter was probably a little inexperienced in the woods. What does worry me is lightning but that is another story.

    My first step to getting over my constant waking up to every branch that snapped or leaf that rustled was ear plugs. They helped me stay asleep and I just learned not to worry about what I couldn't hear. After you learn that what you were worried about has never led to anything other than lost sleep it becomes much easier to relax.

    The other thing that really helped me was reading some of John Muir's writing. Knowing the amount of time that he spent in the woods alone and how well he came out of it all is somewhat comforting. I honestly believe a positive attitude and calmness with where you are and the situation you put yourself in will go a long way.

    Good luck!

    I would also lie to note that I do not carry a gun although I am a gun owner and I do not believe that having one with me would make me feel safe.
    "The mountains are calling and I must go."
    John Muir

    I only went out for a walk and finally concluded to stay out till sundown, for going out, I found, was really going in.
    John Muir

  2. #22
    Senior Member eflat7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Pinebluff, NC
    Hammock
    Eno Doublenest
    Tarp
    OES Standard
    Insulation
    AHE KAQ
    Suspension
    Amsteel w\MSH
    Posts
    1,474
    Images
    37
    Quote Originally Posted by Yosef View Post
    I used to have the same problem and would not sleep well b/c of how tense I was and would wake up and listen to everything. I don't know what made me change but I now feel very comfortable by myself in the woods. I do have a few theories though...

    First is just the pure odds of what there is to be scared of. On the east coast in reality there is just not that much to be scared of in terms of wildlife. Black bears are not viscous animals and if you take the proper precautions like hanging your food then you should be fine. Also sit down and listen to how much noise a squirrel can make, something small can sound much much bigger.

    Second is finding a camp site I am comfortable with. I don't mind camping around other campers as most every person I have ever met on the trail is friendly and harmless. I do prefer to be off the trail some and in an inconspicuous spot. For me it is just peace of mind.

    Third is taking solace in the fact that I have never known or heard of anyone I know that was hurt in the woods or met anyone or any animal that had any malicious effect on a hiker, and I believe most stories you read of a hiker and a bad animal encounter was probably a little inexperienced in the woods. What does worry me is lightning but that is another story.

    My first step to getting over my constant waking up to every branch that snapped or leaf that rustled was ear plugs. They helped me stay asleep and I just learned not to worry about what I couldn't hear. After you learn that what you were worried about has never led to anything other than lost sleep it becomes much easier to relax.

    The other thing that really helped me was reading some of John Muir's writing. Knowing the amount of time that he spent in the woods alone and how well he came out of it all is somewhat comforting. I honestly believe a positive attitude and calmness with where you are and the situation you put yourself in will go a long way.

    Good luck!

    I would also lie to note that I do not carry a gun although I am a gun owner and I do not believe that having one with me would make me feel safe.
    Good post, almost exactly what I was going to write.

    Unlike alot of other posts in this thread I like to be near white noise (not too loud) because I know nothing in the woods is gonna hurt me, and as long as I have the white noise in the background I dont even pay attention to twigs breaking and noises like that. I also take a couple of benadryl if it's a restless night. Benadryl is harmless but make me sleep like a rock.

  3. #23
    Doody's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Mason City, IA
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.1dl HB noseeum modified
    Tarp
    WB BMJ, HH hex
    Insulation
    winter incubator
    Suspension
    Webbing
    Posts
    452
    I have only ever gone alone. I have only really been backpack camping for a couple summers though. I have had a few friends who voiced interest in going but after they figure out there will be no toilets/running water/electricity they get a bit shy.

    I always build a fire. Its backwoods TV. I will read by the fire til its too dark then climb into my hammock with my headlight and read until I drop off which isn't long. I also will listen to the radio or mp3s through earbuds at times. Last summer I hung my hammock under a tree with a great horned owl. Man, they are LOUD when they WHHOOOOOOOO. Twice I shouted to try to scare it off and only succeeded in quieting it for a while.

  4. #24
    Member johnfolsomjr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Carolina
    Hammock
    DIY creation
    Tarp
    WalMart Blue
    Insulation
    DIY UQ
    Suspension
    Whoppie Slings
    Posts
    56
    Images
    21
    I pretty much take a melatonin supplement every night just to help me relax if we're not hiking hard. I also go with ear plugs or an iPod because usually my mind will start racing when it's just me hanging there in the woods so giving my brain something to focus on like music really helps out. Sometimes I wear one of those eye masks like you would on an airplane.
    "We're making art, not taking a test"
    -Willie Williams

  5. #25
    Senior Member SteelerNation's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    GA
    Hammock
    WB Traveler Single 1.7/WBBB DBL 1.1
    Tarp
    ZPack CF/Superfly
    Insulation
    Mt Wsh 3/MMG Shamu
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    641
    I end up solo backpacking a good bit by necessity. Can't say that I feel anxious, but camp is a little bit boring without someone else to share it with. . .

    SN
    Please visit my AmJustDuane YouTube channel

  6. #26
    Senior Member T-BACK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    337
    Images
    11
    I mostly solo. I can remember the defenselessness I felt when I first started camping by myself. I had to make the transition from an Army Grunt and being suspicious of every movement and sound and having weapons for protection to being at the mercy of the darkness and sleeping with no one on guard duty. Experience has taught me some very useful and sometimes funny lessons, some that did not seem so funny at the time. Reason helps me too.

    Consider these thoughts:

    -There is nothing in the woods at night that is not there during the day.

    -As a human, you have de facto dominion over 99.999% of the animal world. Unfortunately, not so much with the insects.

    -There is an inverse relationship between the size of an animal and the amount of noise it makes traveling through the forest. A big bull moose or a bear can move darn-near silently. An armadillo on the other hand chooses not to go around much of anything. It will go under, over, or especially through any obstacle in its path. They are all but oblivious to their surroundings and their lot in life is to wander around haphazardly scarring unsuspecting campers at night.

    -Sound travels farther at night and seems closer than what it actually is.

    -If you stealth camp, the chance of someone just happening onto your campsite is pretty near nil unless you build a fire or smoke tobacco.

    -You can take some Benedryl to help you get to sleep if you are really anxious.

    Go out for a few overnight trips even if you stay awake all night with a flashlight in your hand. You will start to get the feel of the woods at night. Your fear will decrease and you will start to marvel at a new world. Enjoy the skies full of stars, satellites, and meteors. Listen to the owls and the yips of the coyotes and the wind through the trees. A partner can help get you through the adjustment period, until you can identify the sounds you are hearing.

    Above all don't give up. Some of the most wonderful experiences I have ever had were while I was solo hiking or canoeing.
    Brian
    ...and there came to be a day, all too soon, that I became aware that I could travel no more on my long journey. Though I did not arrive where I had planned, I believe that here is exactly where I am supposed to be...

  7. #27
    kayak karl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South, South Jersey
    Posts
    3,172
    Images
    7
    i backpack with my son 3 days every year. we do a walkabout around the Wharton Tract. other then that i go solo always. have met a few on the way for a few days, a week or a month. Swamp Fox and Rocky, Rock, Darkman, Fourleaf, Watchman, Hal the Hiker, Let it Be, Mossie Brown. Gaia, Crocked Hair, Muncher, Trek, ................ i probably would not have hiked with these people if i was all ready a part of a group. SOLO is the best
    It's not procrastinating, its proactively delaying the implementation of the energy-intensive phase of the project until the enthusiasm factor is at its maximum effectiveness.

  8. #28
    Senior Member bigbamaguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    NE Alabama
    Hammock
    Clark NX-200
    Tarp
    Clark XL-Fly
    Insulation
    KAQ NR UQ/AHE KAQ
    Suspension
    Strap/cinch buckle
    Posts
    2,426
    When I get out by myself I usually use earplugs and a shot of crown royal!!!!!!! YMMV.
    Par Si Vis Pace Para Bellum

  9. #29
    Senior Member Raul Perez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Hammock
    1.1 Blackbird or Traveler SL
    Tarp
    OES Deluxe Cuben
    Insulation
    Yeti - all seasons
    Suspension
    Dynaglide Whoopies
    Posts
    2,363
    Images
    49
    Eeeh.... I just find it easy to pass out in my hammock. Can't explain it. I wake up if a noise gets too close I assess and go back to sleep. I expect noises at night in the woods
    "If you give a monkey a gun and he shoots someone, you dont blame the monkey"

    The end of the world is not coming in December, it is happening now in my living room. - TFC Rick

    http://watermonkey.net/

    Youtube Channel:

    http://www.youtube.com/user/RaulPerez1?feature=mhee

  10. #30
    beep's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Hammock
    WB BB 1.1 dbl
    Tarp
    MacCat Dlx SpinnUL
    Insulation
    Phoenix/Incubator
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    2,078
    Images
    47
    It took me a couple of trips to actually reach the point where I enjoyed solo backpacking. At first it just felt really different. I now look forward to my solo trips...AND my trips with my wife...AND my trips with HF members. Each type of trip has a different dynamic and rhythm. Frankly, I can't say one is better than another but they are quite different.
    "The more I carry the happier I am in camp; the less I carry the happier I am getting there" - Sgt. Rock

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •