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  1. #1
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    3 Season or Winter UQ?

    Hey Everyone

    I have recently ordered a Switchback and a Mac cat ultra tarp. I now have to decide on the UQ. At first I was going to get one of the baby orcas but it only has a rating of 40. I think I could get by with that most of the time during the summer but I wouldn't mind having the peace of mind I can get down to at least the 30's with out any additional pieces except for the UQ.

    This is where I am leaning towards the hammock gear UQ. I have read great reviews and they do look great. Because of the cost I will probably only own one UQ in the near future and will do some winter camping. Nothing to extreme.

    If I were to get a 3 season and than put a thermarest between the layers of the hammock during the winter how low could you go?

    What I really trying to figure out is would I be able use a winter UQ in the summer or would it be to much of a hassle?

    My second question. I am only 5' 10". during the summer I would rather not carry any sort of pad for my feet, would I be able to get away with that on a 3/4? Or would the full length be the best bet?

    Thanks again. Many of you have already provided a lot of sound advice over the last couple of weeks and I am very grateful!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Bomber's Avatar
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    I can't help you with the 3/4 length - i don't have enough experience with them. But regarding 3 season or winter quilt: I use a winter incubator up temps where an UQ is not needed. I also use it indoors(i sleep in a hammock full time) with no problems what so ever(except it's so darn comfy, that i have a hard time getting out of the hammock in the morning )

    The only major concern in my view, is if you are willing to carry the extra weight in the summer....
    /Bomber.LTD
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Beast 71's Avatar
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    I have a Jack-R-Better Mount Washington 3 Convertible (MW3C) and I find it VERY versatile. I use it in 2/3rds mode during the heat of the summer. Then I can use it in full mode down to about 10F. Below that I put a thermarest pad in it and it's kept me warm nicely below zero. The MW3C allows me to have one under quilt (UQ) for all conditions and has saved me from having to buy several UQs. But of course ymmv. Also some people just hate pads .

  4. #4
    ^shane^'s Avatar
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    I have both a winter incubator and 3S incubator. If you are only buying one UQ, get the winter incubator. You can vent the ends of the winter incubator to allow air flow on warmer nights, but you can't add down to the 3S incubator when you are butt cold.

    You will be happy with your HG quilt, no matter which way you go. They make great gear.
    "One of the best things you can do in this world is take a nap in the woods." ~ Jayber Crow by Wendell Berry

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    Enjoy the day
    Shane

  5. #5
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    I am really starting to think the winter incubator will be the one to go with. Although at 28 ounces its pretty much the weight of the hammock but to be warm for pretty much any weather I am ok with that. However how small would the winter incubator pack down to?

    I was thinking no matter which one I get I would get a dry sac to keep it in so there is very little chance the down gets wet. Is this what most of you do?

  6. #6
    beep's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlink View Post
    I was thinking no matter which one I get I would get a dry sac to keep it in so there is very little chance the down gets wet. Is this what most of you do?
    Yes. Wet down=>
    "The more I carry the happier I am in camp; the less I carry the happier I am getting there" - Sgt. Rock

  7. #7
    Senior Member ChrisH's Avatar
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    The Winter Incubator is probably your best bet. I am thinking of selling my 3S and getting a Winter Incubator as well. It would be quite hot in the summer but you can always vent.

    I wouldn't keep my down items in a true dry bag, I would keep them in something that is water resistant and breathable. You want it to breathe so that any moisture in the down can escape. There are many ways moisture can get into the down, your perspiration is one of them. You definitely don't want that moisture trapped inside a dry bag. I think that's why Adam and Jenny don't ship them with silnylon stuff sacks but I could definitely be wrong. My 2 cents, HYOY, YMMV.

  8. #8
    Senior Member G.L.P.'s Avatar
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    it all depends on you... are you a warm sleeper?
    and are you going to be doing alot of hanging in the winter ?
    or most of the time 3 season?

    i say get the 3 season .... the HG 3 season if i remember can go down to 20F
    20F should get you into winter ... and if you add a 2QZQ underquilt protector or even a driducks poncho with mod you can get another 5-10F out of your quilt add an extra layer and i don't see why you can get down to 10-15F
    you can always get a winter UQ down the line... or even make one

    i'm a warm sleeper and i took a 3 season yeti down to 17F ....
    so everyone will be different but like i said if your going to be doing more hanging in 3 season get the 3 season ... do you really want to lug around a winter UQ in the summer?
    It puts the Underquilt on it's hammock ... It does this whenever it gets cold

  9. #9
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    How often do you really go out in winter temps (less than 25-30 deg)? If you do the majority of your camping warmer than that, and you backpack and have to carry the weight and stuff it into a pack, I'd get the 3-season. You can add a pretty thin pad to get yourself down to winter temps, and you won't have to do it so often. But if you get the winter incubator, every trip you'll be carrying that weight and volume. Plus, it is more expensive.

    As you can guess from the responses, either choice might be right for you! Good luck and happy hanging.

  10. #10
    MedicineMan's Avatar
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    one cheap(er) option is to get a 3season, add a 1/4 inch ccf pad when you are going to push the limits and go deeper down the cold avenue.
    The ccf pad doesn't have to be huge either, torso length is plenty-shoulders to hips.
    Ask yourself how many times you'll be out at 10F, how many at 20F and how many above freezing...then see how much you want to spend.
    The 1/4 inch ccf can add a min. of 15 degrees to your warmth factor.
    Also remember that the warmer you are on the bottom the less you'll need on top-funny how that works

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