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  1. #21
    but enough about me hppyfngy's Avatar
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    I've built them a DL 1.9, doubled the hem and double stitched the channels, whipped it good and am now either going to use 1/8 or webbing, I haven't decided yet. Probably just do webbing.

    I think I will have done my due diligence.

    After all, they are only my in-laws...
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  2. #22
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    That should be strong enough to let them all pile in and pull trees over.

  3. #23
    but enough about me hppyfngy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmcttr View Post
    That should be strong enough to let them all pile in and pull trees over.
    Yeah I think so. That 1.9 DL is strong to the point of being stiff! I had to run it through the washer just to get it comfortable, but I'm used to single layer 1.5...

    They'll like it and it should hold them fine.
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  4. #24
    I seem to get along better with some of my in-laws than some of them that are out-laws.

  5. #25
    Member Thirstybear's Avatar
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    chart and amsteel

    In response to the chart, it is dead on with applied forces and weight distribution, so those figures are correct, on the other hand my brother did a break strength test on 7/64 at work and the results were astounding. First test, the amsteel broke at 11,174 kn or 2512 pounds of applied force, with a knot! which greatly decreases the strength of the structure. Retied the same piece and retested and the second run held 3 more newtons of force also with a knot. With that being said, your whoopies are not going to be the problem. Likely the areas of failure are going to be the hammock body first the hitch second straps third and then the whoopies. This dyneema is pretty amazing stuff, i encourage anyone to look at the applied forces this stuff takes on racing sailboats, pretty impressive.
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  6. #26
    kc0qnx's Avatar
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    I switched out to 1/8 on one of mine only because I felt the diameter of the line might be easier on the hammock fabric itself...did 1/8 cont loops through the channels & clip to 1/8 whoops.
    As far as weight differences between the 1/8 & 7/64ths......darn little to most, almost nonexistent really, I can't tell anyway, when it's all rolled up. YMMV

  7. #27
    craige's Avatar
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    I'm reasonably sure that most folk use webbing that has a breaking strain of 1500lb or less? Am I wrong? Maybe but I know the stuff dutch sells is rated at 1000lbs, to me it makes no sense to use anything stronger than dynaglide with dutch webbing or 7/64 with 1500lb webbing otherwise the webbing will break before the whoopies!?!? Or am I missing something?

  8. #28
    Mr. Arrowhead pgibson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by craige View Post
    I'm reasonably sure that most folk use webbing that has a breaking strain of 1500lb or less? Am I wrong? Maybe but I know the stuff dutch sells is rated at 1000lbs, to me it makes no sense to use anything stronger than dynaglide with dutch webbing or 7/64 with 1500lb webbing otherwise the webbing will break before the whoopies!?!? Or am I missing something?

    No your not wrong...if one component is rated to 1000 then having all your others rated to 2000 dose not make the whole system stronger.

    And following that line of thought most hammock bodies/fabric would fail well before you got 1000 pounds into them to break the suspension components. Hang smart, Hang at 30, don't overload the system.

    If one tire on your car is worn out and about to go flat the other 3 new tires won't keep holding the car up while you go down the free way.
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  9. #29
    New Member Mr. Pink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thirstybear View Post
    In response to the chart, it is dead on with applied forces and weight distribution, so those figures are correct, on the other hand my brother did a break strength test on 7/64 at work and the results were astounding. First test, the amsteel broke at 11,174 kn or 2512 pounds of applied force, with a knot! which greatly decreases the strength of the structure. Retied the same piece and retested and the second run held 3 more newtons of force also with a knot. With that being said, your whoopies are not going to be the problem. Likely the areas of failure are going to be the hammock body first the hitch second straps third and then the whoopies. This dyneema is pretty amazing stuff, i encourage anyone to look at the applied forces this stuff takes on racing sailboats, pretty impressive.
    I believe you might have meant 11.174 kn? If not, then that's some mighty strong amsteel you have there.

  10. #30
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by craige View Post
    I'm reasonably sure that most folk use webbing that has a breaking strain of 1500lb or less? Am I wrong? Maybe but I know the stuff dutch sells is rated at 1000lbs, to me it makes no sense to use anything stronger than dynaglide with dutch webbing or 7/64 with 1500lb webbing otherwise the webbing will break before the whoopies!?!? Or am I missing something?
    Actually, much of the webbing in use has a breaking strength of less than 1500lb. I don't think the polypropylene straps Clark furnishes have that rating, and many folks re-purpose straps from emergency towing kits with a bs --I'm not confusing it with working strength -- of less than 1500lb. Whether that is smart depends on how disciplined you are in checking the residual quality of the strap before each use.

    Breaking strength means "strength under specified conditions and testing protocols."

    The hazards to different parts of the system are different. So, you might prefer that portions subject to abrasion, for example, have a higher strength rating. Strands of tree straps wear unevenly, and they are notorious for being cut by hardware connections. Some materials fatigue under repeated or constant use at fractions of breaking strength.

    I am sure that the last thing Dutch intends when he builds hardware to certain estimated strengths is to lead everyone to that minimum estimated standard. That makes no more sense than selecting other components not to exceed the hammock makers' estimated maximum load.
    Last edited by DemostiX; 01-21-2013 at 13:48.

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