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  1. #11
    Senior Member Law Dawg (ret)'s Avatar
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    Sep 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by aboyd View Post
    I started out with the big heavy Kelty Noah 12, plenty of room, but could never get it as tight as I would like.

    I have since gone with the AHE Shangri La, 11' by 9'10" at the head, and I think 7' at the foot in. It's a tapered tarp. I really like it and have weather some pretty heavy rain storms under it just fine.
    Me too and found the 12x12 can also be a bear to set up when things get tight or there are two hammocks close. Got the Shangri La and a Toxaway. The Shangri La has only been tested in Rainbird type lawn sprinklers but has held up surprisingly well and does give a decent front porch set up. The Toxaway is my go to for long moto travel with uncertain weather. It will not close up like many of its bigger cousins but it offers enough coverage to block wind and a great porch. Thinking about adding a couple of Grizz Beaks for when stuff gets extra windy/cold/wet.

    The Shangri La is a breeze to set up in close quarters but there needs to be some good placement. The Toxaway allows more wiggle room in your set up. Both beat the snot out of the Kelty 12x12 both in ease of set up and bulk/weight. If I were in doubt the Toxaway would be the go to choice.
    Mark is the name and If there is more than one way to understand what I just said....I meant the good one.

    Earth First! We'll dirt bike ride the other planets later.

  2. #12
    Senior Member G.L.P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wags View Post
    the other side of the "bigger to smaller" tarp thinking is this: you may not be as careful setting up and not get as skilled. i, personally am glad that i learned with a smaller tarp first, before getting a bigger one for winter...
    my first tarp was a stock HH tarp so i learned the hard way fast LOL
    for some a smaller tarp is ok to start out with but for the most part it's better to get a nice size 3 season tarp to learn with ... i know a few ppl that will not use a hammock again because they had one bad night with a stock HH tarp...
    but like you i'm glad i started out small ...
    It puts the Underquilt on it's hammock ... It does this whenever it gets cold

  3. #13
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    May 2007
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    Denver, CO
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    Warbonnet ON!
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    Given your selections, I'd choose the Edge.

    While I do see the value of a larger tarp for a new hanger, I tend to agree that the best way to become proficient with a tarp is to require proficiency. You learn tarp skills pretty quick when you start getting wet due to poor setup. I don't necessarily think folks should start with the napkin tarps (OES Micro, HH Asym, WB Diamond Fly, etc.), but a nice 'in-the-middle' tarp is a better option for both coverage and education IMO.

    The issue with large tarps in densely wooded areas is mostly about the ridge length. You can always pitch a wide tarp steeply and fit it just about anywhere, but you need the distance between trees to be enough, cause you can't really fudge that....much.
    Trust nobody!

  4. #14
    Senior Member ringtail-THFKAfood's Avatar
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    Nov 2006
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    size matters?

    On the Colorado summer hang I had the only small tarp, a MLD UL Hammock Tarp (5.1 oz.). We had a lot of rain. I stayed dry, but when people got together to share meals and to swap lies, it was NOT under my tarp.

    It you hike long days solo then a small tarp is fine.

    If you occasionally want to set up to appreciate the view rather than be sheltered then you need a bigger tarp.

    On the other hand I will not carry a tarp that requires more than two stakes per side. If you need three stakes per side, then add the two you need for panel pulls, then two each end for the doors you are carrying more weight in stakes than I carry in the tarp. Any each stake needs some guyline. Managing twelve stakes with guylines is more than my pea brain can handle after a long day of hiking!

    The rule is the same as all gear. Match your gear to your style.
    It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so.
    - Mark Twain

  5. #15
    New Member
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    Jul 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by myles to go View Post
    Hey there Hikeabout, I would like to here more about you hike in chignecto park NS. I have been wanting to go there for a few years now and I only live a few hours drive so how does some one in Mass find out about that trail? A few years back I did the Fundy footpath and Fundy N.P which is the sister trail on the New brunswick side of the Bay of Fundy and looks across to chignecto . I'm jealous
    One of my hiking buddies found chignecto. We wanted to find a hike somewhat close (9 hour drive each way, bleh) but still see some new terrain, and the bay of fundy sounds pretty epic, plus we've never done any coastal hiking. So other than the drive to get there I'm pretty excited. We don't go until the end of August, but I'll be sure to post some pictures of the trip, featuring my hammock of course.

  6. #16
    New Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by food View Post
    On the Colorado summer hang I had the only small tarp, a MLD UL Hammock Tarp (5.1 oz.). We had a lot of rain. I stayed dry, but when people got together to share meals and to swap lies, it was NOT under my tarp.

    It you hike long days solo then a small tarp is fine.

    If you occasionally want to set up to appreciate the view rather than be sheltered then you need a bigger tarp.

    On the other hand I will not carry a tarp that requires more than two stakes per side. If you need three stakes per side, then add the two you need for panel pulls, then two each end for the doors you are carrying more weight in stakes than I carry in the tarp. Any each stake needs some guyline. Managing twelve stakes with guylines is more than my pea brain can handle after a long day of hiking!

    The rule is the same as all gear. Match your gear to your style.
    Although the weight doesn't worry me too much, I would like to limit the hassle and complexity at the end of the day, so your point about extra stakes, guy lines, etc. is well received. I hadn't put too much thought into that aspect.

  7. #17
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    Thanks for all the input folks. I was hoping my decision was close at hand, but now I've been side tracked by the ogee tarps. I like the idea of having multiple set up options, like a simple two stake diamond configuration if it's been a long day and I'm feeling lazy or I find myself setting up after dark.

  8. #18
    REV's Avatar
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    May 2011
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    i had a bigger rectangle tarp that i set up once and did not like at all, so i sold it and got me a superfly.

    now, my only "issue" with the superfly is its not the fastest setup out there, and for me being a beginner it can get frustrating getting everything right and tight.

    that being said, i love it. lots of room, with no hammock and the doors closed you can fit 6 people sitting under it, cooking too id bet. at some point im sure ill work my way down to something smaller and faster to pitch, but right now im happy and dont mind the guy line fuss.

    i like my space, and to be social (on occasion)
    Give a man fire and he's warm for the night.
    Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life. Dante

    2014 Fall Sprawl Planning Thread
    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...GER-amp-BETTER!

  9. #19
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2010
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    @ Hikeabout:
    If you are walking a lot of distance, and it sounds like you are, than light weight will take precedence over a circus tent tarp.
    I will be at a buschcrafting day at Freetown State Park by Fall River MA this SUnday with two hammocks, one with an asym and the other with a monster HH Hex. Come along and have a look and chat if you wish, it's open to all. pm me if you want details.

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