Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1
    DaleW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Hammock
    Hennessy Expedition Zip
    Tarp
    Arrowhead Toxaway
    Insulation
    Wilderness Logics
    Suspension
    DIY whoopie slings
    Posts
    471

    DIY no-sew summer under cover

    The whole under cover/under quilt thing has been an annoyance as a newbie to hangin'. I can see how it all developed as hammocks started as tropical jungle rigs and wound up being used in the middle of a Minnesota winter at -20F. But the idea that you are going to go hammock camping without an under cover or under quilt anywhere in North America in the mountains or anything other than full summer weather is just wrong. Duh.

    The annoyance as a newbie comes with the realization that using a pad inside a hammock isn't very comfortable-- or all that warm. I'm a newbie to hammocks but I'm no stranger to camping and I have all kinds of ground insulation, with most of it being next to useless in a hammock, width being the biggest problem, with comfort and stability being close contenders. The rub is that you just dropped a wad on the hammock and tarp and you are only halfway there cost and weight wise. Of course I assumed that when I bought a hammock I would be able to drop my excellent ground insulation and sleeping bag in and be off and running. Kinda, but not really.

    IMHO, any of the hammock manufacturers should work this into their product lines more fully. As a newbie, the double-bottom hammocks seem to be the most forgiving as you can just put a foam pad in and be covered for most 3-season camping. Under quilts can be added as the new owner needs or can afford them.

    So, after finding hammocks extremely comfortable and wanting to continue the relationship, I found my cold backside and my budget at odds. I looked over the options and applied what I know about staying warm and dry and using what was already in my gear locker.

    Toys on hand:

    Hennessy Expedition Zip
    Grand Trunk Ultralight
    Whoopie slings, biners, tree straps
    Ground cloth(s)
    AMK HeatSheet
    CCF pads
    Self inflating pads
    Cordage

    The goal was to get some insulation on the bottom of the Hennessy. The first increment is to get through the rest of the summer with 40F and rain coverage. With the Zip model I don't need to worry about bottom access, so that simplifies things right off. I like the under cover and foam arrangement of the Hennessy SuperShelter, but after buying the hammock, a larger tarp (I live in Western Washington --- lots of rain), Amsteel for whoopie slings, biners, and longer tree straps, I didn't have room in the budget for another $125 or so for the SuperShelter or any of the basic under quilts.

    I like the undercover concept for the wind and rain protection. It allows using various levels and types of insulation, give full-length coverage and it is simple to deploy.

    My first shot at getting bottom coverage was to adapt the Grand Trunk Ultralight as a bottom cover. I had already replaced the stock rope and S hook suspension with a Wild Country carabiner and whoopie slings, so I had this big piece of polyester fabric with channels in the ends. The bare fabric is just 9oz, which I don't think is bad. It was simple enough to string it up on the ends of the Hennessy and tie the sides of the GTUL into the pull-outs on the sides of the Hennessy. I added a foam pad and space blanket. That arrangement is okay, but the fabric on the GTUL is very porous-- great on a hot summer day, but it allows a low of convection loss and isn't water resistant. The foam pad and space blanket were kind of loose, but worked okay; with the Zip model , it is easy to reach below and move things around. Conversion from hammock to UC was simple enough as I could leave the hanging/drawstrings in the channels and slip the carabiners in and out.

    But I wanted more, so I went through my gear locker to see what could be used. I found a spinnaker ground cloth I bought years ago and never used. I think it was a Gossamer Gear product at the time and it no longer offered. It is a white spinnaker cloth with a ripstop grid and nearly 100% waterproof. The "nearly" part is why I never got around to using it for a ground cloth. I also had an AMK Heatsheet and some paracord.

    Specs:

    AMK HeatSheet: 60"x96", 3oz
    Spinnaker ground cloth: 54" x 86", 4.oz
    Paracord --- 6'

    Newbie "enlightenment" concept: under covers don't need to be weight bearing, so they don't require sewing and can be gathered on the ends. All that is needed is a non-weight bearing hammock.

    So I took the end of the spinnaker cloth and coupled it up with the HeatSheet, leaving 1" of the spinnaker cloth on the outboard side and gathered it, making 1" pleats. As I got towards the center I made extra pleats in the HeatSheet as it is 6" wider and let the spinnaker cloth overlap 1" on the outside edge as I did when I started gathering. My idea was that the HeatSheet would be fully inside the spinnaker cloth, protecting it and making more slack inside. I took a 3' section of paracord and whipped the gathered end of the cloth with 4 wraps and finished with an overhand knot on what would be the bottom side and a square knot on the top side, so gathered cloth hangs down, away from the hammock when tied on. I repeated the process for the other end.

    The Hennessey came with Delrin snap hooks on braided line and a prussic knot on the suspension so I used them to clip the spinnaker cloth/HeatSheet sandwich under the hammock. The Hennessey has shock cords pull-outs on both sides and I pulled a little bight of the spinnaker cloth through the rings for the shock cords and took a couple half-hitches around the bight with the shock cord. That mated it all together and pulled the undercover out with the hammock. I may lash some mitten hooks to the cloth for the sides and use shock cord for the ends. The side mitten hooks would allow lashing the HeatSheet on the sides and help keep it in place.

    So I hopped in and relaxed for a while. I could feel the heat reflected off the HeatSheet and no convection cooling. A foam pad of just about any kind could be added between the spinnaker cloth and the HeatSheet a la SuperShelter.

    Caveats:

    *The seal on the sides isn't perfect, so some warmth may be lost there. On the plus side, moisture can get out.

    *The 86" length on the fabric I'm using doesn't reach the ends of the hammock, so there isn't 100% coverage. Given the cost and weight, that doesn't bother me. It's fine on the warmth issue and only the last 15" or so of the ends are exposed.
    *The important concept is to avoid stretching the HeatSheet tight, leaving it loose and lumpy, trapping all the air possible, as well as avoiding damage to the HeatSheet.
    *Another option would be to buy enough lightweight fabric to reach the ends of the hammock and just lay the HeatSheet in the under cover, or gather the layers separately and use a short runner between the end of the HeatSheet and under cover-- the idea being to spread the layers out and stabilize them

    Other ideas:

    *Put my extra clothing in the UC.

    *Use Polycro plastic for the most lightweight quick-and-dirty version. Polycro has long been used by ultralight hikers for ground cloths. It is the heat-shrink stuff sold for insulating windows. you can buy the extra large Frost King kit from Home Depot for about $6-- over 200" long. It weighs nearly nothing. It wouldn't breath. With this version, it would be interesting to use the double-stick tape that comes with the window kit to glue the HeatSheet inside on the ends (with appropriate slack in the mix). It would be more than tough enough to hold up a foam pad and it would be super compact.

    *Use a silnylon poncho in the same way. It would be great to have light shock cords in the bottom hems of the poncho, gathering the ends and making attachment points. The shock cord could be functional for when the poncho is used as rain gear, drawing the back hem of the poncho up under your pack. I see no reason why a "tailored" undercover couldn't be used as a poncho. It actually makes more sense to use it under the hammock, where the hood isn't an issue for leaking and the dimensions aren't a weak rain tarp size, and more than enough for a UC. Dump in a pad, quilt and/or HeatSheet.
    * A good poncho size is ~54" x 108", giving enough fabric on the back side to cover your pack. Note the similarity in size to many hammocks.

    My 2 cents and thanks for the newbie rant on insulation.
    Last edited by DaleW; 07-16-2011 at 18:05.

  2. #2
    DaleW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Hammock
    Hennessy Expedition Zip
    Tarp
    Arrowhead Toxaway
    Insulation
    Wilderness Logics
    Suspension
    DIY whoopie slings
    Posts
    471
    I just dug out an old PU coated poncho and was able to get drawstrings through the bottom hems. This rocks for an undercover. With a long backpacker-style poncho, it leaves just a foot of each end of the hammock exposed. I can see throwing a line across the ridge line of the hammock or rigging my tarp with a continuous ridge line and using that to help support the sides of the undercover--- several inches of coverage are gained on each side.

    Add a foam pad and space blanket and it's done.

    I pulled the hood up inside and pulled the drawstring up tight. Nothing more is needed there.

  3. #3
    Needs more Hang time Catavarie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Hammock
    LeanGreen/BigRed/DIY
    Tarp
    CatCut Hex/GG12
    Insulation
    Fur I grow myself
    Suspension
    Of Disbelief
    Posts
    3,519
    Images
    3
    Very inventive method of creating a DIY summer UQ with the things you had on hand.

    I particularly like the use of the poncho as the UQ/Weather Shield. Never was fond of using one as a shelter.
    *Heaven best have trees, because I plan to lounge for eternity.

    Good judgement is the result of experience and experience the result of bad judgement. - Mark Twain

    Trail name: Radar

    2014 Smoked Butt Hang Planning Thread | Sign up Sheet

  4. #4
    DaleW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Hammock
    Hennessy Expedition Zip
    Tarp
    Arrowhead Toxaway
    Insulation
    Wilderness Logics
    Suspension
    DIY whoopie slings
    Posts
    471
    Shug has a video on using a DriDucks poncho as a weather shield. DriDucks would be interesting as it breathes. Too bad they don't make long ones that will cover you pack, or cover your backside with your pack on

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P5RIT5ZZ31w

  5. #5
    Senior Member G.L.P.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Schuylkill Co. PA
    Hammock
    DIY,WBBB,DutchBridge
    Tarp
    Cuben,Superfly
    Insulation
    Quilts :P
    Suspension
    Dutchware
    Posts
    5,107
    Quote Originally Posted by DaleW View Post
    Shug has a video on using a DriDucks poncho as a weather shield. DriDucks would be interesting as it breathes. Too bad they don't make long ones that will cover you pack, or cover your backside with your pack on

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P5RIT5ZZ31w
    i have had lots of good luck covering my pack with my driducks poncho Dale..
    it covers my MLD Newt just right ... and with the shock cord mod for the under cover i cinch it around my waist and it's just like a rain parka

    but with a bigger pack i don't see it working...

    a driducks poncho will be fine for temps about 70-75F if your a warm sleeper ..
    you could always make a SPE ... or have someone make you one
    there not hard to make and you can use your old pads from your ground sleeping days till you get funds for an UQ

    also army poncho liners work really good for UQ's on the cheap just sew in a channel on the ends and some tabs and your set...

    my first DIY UQ was made form a $20 sleeping bag... it worked ok till i got money saved up for my first Quilt
    It puts the Underquilt on it's hammock ... It does this whenever it gets cold

  6. #6
    Senior Member G.L.P.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Schuylkill Co. PA
    Hammock
    DIY,WBBB,DutchBridge
    Tarp
    Cuben,Superfly
    Insulation
    Quilts :P
    Suspension
    Dutchware
    Posts
    5,107
    speaking of SPE's... i see you scored one LOL

    nice that will work great till you get money for an UQ ...
    maybe add a driducks poncho with the Undercover mod and your set
    It puts the Underquilt on it's hammock ... It does this whenever it gets cold

  7. #7
    DaleW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Hammock
    Hennessy Expedition Zip
    Tarp
    Arrowhead Toxaway
    Insulation
    Wilderness Logics
    Suspension
    DIY whoopie slings
    Posts
    471
    Yeah, ask and you shall receive I guess

    I'm not much of a snow camper, so aiming for 32F is fine with me. Using the SPE allows going to ground if needed. I have several different pads and lots of 5mm EVA foam, so those options are covered. I'm trying to keep the weight and bulk down too. I don't like down as a rule.

    I have a prototype synthetic bag that is really just a comforter/flat quilt at this point and I have very little invested-- I got it at a garage sale. My daughter will be home soon and I'm going to enlist her help in turning it into a nice synthetic UQ. A quick trim and some open hems for shock cord tubes should do nicely.

  8. #8
    Senior Member EricFromPortland's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Hammock
    WB 1.1DBL, Eno DBL
    Tarp
    WB Super or Edge
    Insulation
    DIY TQ and UQ
    Suspension
    Whoooooopy!
    Posts
    143
    Photos needed for my comprehension.....

  9. #9
    DaleW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Hammock
    Hennessy Expedition Zip
    Tarp
    Arrowhead Toxaway
    Insulation
    Wilderness Logics
    Suspension
    DIY whoopie slings
    Posts
    471
    I plan on rigging it outside and getting some photos. My inside "test bed" is too tight for good shots.

    It's just a piece of spinnaker cloth sandwiched with a space blanket, gathered on the end in an accordion fold and then hung under/around the main hammock to trap heat and block wind. You could do this with 3 yards of any light DWR windproof fabric, a space blanket and a little paracord or shock cord. Shove a wide CCF pad under the space blanket and it is done.

    I christen it the "UnderTaco" !

    3 yards would be longer than my example and give better coverage. I'm cooking up a custom poncho to accomplish the same. Getting the multiple use from the poncho as rain gear and weather shield is a plus in my ultralight hiking world.





    Last edited by DaleW; 07-16-2011 at 23:59.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Hammock
    Hennesy
    Tarp
    various
    Insulation
    pads, foam
    Posts
    3,911
    Images
    17
    get some light open cell foam to put in and you will have a super super shelter. ;-)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •