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  1. #21
    New Member alacamper's Avatar
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    Apr 2011
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    Pine Hill, Al.
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    mamajamba
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    whoopie
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    33
    looks like you got a lot of tips use some of them or all of them just make sure you let us know how it goes. happy trails and happy hanging!!!!

  2. #22
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    hershey, PA
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    your camera

  3. #23
    Senior Member bmwrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Detroit area
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wags View Post
    your camera
    Of all the gear I own, which is far too much, my cool water proof impact resistant camera is the one thing I can't seem to find.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Trooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Lake St. Clair
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmwrider View Post
    Thanks so much folks, I already love this forum and I've only been on it for a week or so.

    Ok,
    1. practice setup
    2. 30* angle for hang
    3. 2 fingers on ridgeline turned 90* while in hammock
    4. pillow for under knees to avoid hyperextension if needed

    This is what I wanted to know, I have learned this little thing make such a big difference, I'm not used to being new at something, its kinda weird
    The 30° angle and 90° tension test comes from Warbonnet's instructions. A Hennessy might do a little better with less than 30°. In contrast, the DD hammock suggests "it should be tied reasonably tight (so its almost a straight line from tree to tree with no-one inside) and should rest just above sitting height." Hennessy doesn't seem to have much guidance on this, but I think they are similar to the DD's in design. Ultimately, the angle that is comfortable for you is the right one.

    Don't forget bottom insulation--it can't be stressed enough. Foam pads are the least expensive and perfectly adequate until you can enjoy the luxury of an underquilt.
    Last edited by Trooper; 07-27-2011 at 21:09.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Str1der's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Conyers, Ga
    Hammock
    Blackbird 1.7 DL
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    543
    Unfortunately most (not all) hammockers agree that the most comfortable form of bottom insulation is an underquilt, not pads. If you are forced to use pads, just be aware that you likely have not yet fully tapped into the maximum comfort a hammock can provide. You should still be far more comfortale than in a tent though.

    Have fun!
    "The Road goes ever on and on,
    Down from the door where it began.
    Now far ahead the Road has gone,
    And I must follow, if I can.
    Pursuing it with eager feet
    Until it joins some larger way
    Where many paths and errands meet.
    And whither then? I cannot say."
    ~Bilbo Baggins - LotR

  6. #26
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
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    DD Camping Hammock
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trooper View Post
    The 30° angle and 90° tension test comes from Warbonnet's instructions. A Hennessy might do a little better with less than 30°. In contrast, the DD hammock suggests "it should be tied reasonably tight (so its almost a straight line from tree to tree with no-one inside) and should rest just above sitting height." Hennessy doesn't seem to have much guidance on this, but I think they are similar to the DD's in design. Ultimately, the angle that is comfortable for you is the right one.
    I've had my DD Hammcock up for a week now and I'd bet the " almost a straight line from tree to tree with no-one inside" recommendation is because the stock rope sucks so ungodly bad. I had read it has "some" stretch but my god it was like using bungee cords. You just couldn't use a ridge line with them and you need a wench to tighten them on the tree.

    I've switched to tree huggers/dutch clips+whoopie slings+continuous loop/descender rings and setting up a 30° ridge line doesn't seem to be an issue.

  7. #27
    Two Tents's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Hadley, Pa.
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    Wilderness Logic Night OWL
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    947
    Don't forget breakfast. Oohh and be sure not to forget second breakfast. If you wake up cold in the night grab a snack out of the storage thingy to fuel the furnace! Something to drink is always nice too.
    I like refried beans. That's why I wanna try fried beans, because maybe they're just as good and we're just wasting time. You don't have to fry them again after all.

  8. #28
    in it for the naps oldgringo's Avatar
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    Warning: Initiates will be required to run laps in full hiking gear.
    Dave

    http://www.uark.edu/misc/xtimber/rna/pattonsbluff.html

    It has always been my private conviction that any man who pits his intelligence against a fish and loses has it coming.
    John Steinbeck

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