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  1. #11
    olddog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    I see another trip to the fabric store coming up!
    Most of us end up poorer here but richer for being here. Olddog, Fulltime hammocker, 365 nights a year.

  2. #12
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Milton, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhollyHamaca View Post
    My very first indoor hammock was a diy made from a high thread-count (450 tpi?) all-cotton flat sheet from a closeout store. Slept in it every night for a few years with no problems. Eminently washable and happened to be a beautiful burgundy color.

    My first "winter" indoor hammock was made with a very soft, tightly woven, double-thick wool blanket I got in Peru in the late '60's. Now THAT's a comfy hammock! I still use it and love it. Been washed many times. No UQ needed.

    Another choice for a soft-finish fabric might be cotton Monk's cloth in 2x2 or 4x4 weave, also called Aida (I think). Looks like a thermal-weave cotton blanket (which also could work well, maybe doubled, depending on your weight). I'd stay away from canvas or duck (too stiff for me).

    I agree, real silk would be very fine indeed! I NEED a silk one!
    Many people find bedsheets too short for a comfortable long term hammock. Not saying they don't work, just too short for me and some others. I would also say that Aida cloth is too rough and nobbly for my liking. That's just a personal preference. I like a smoother surface finish. I'm not as fond of the "hand" that aida has. IOW the way it feels, drapes and works. Those are highly subjective issues though. You might like it.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
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  3. #13
    Senior Member QChan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Edmonton, A.B.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aven View Post
    QChan, which silk did you go with?
    I can't honestly tell you, someone gifted the fabric to me, and simply told me it was silk.

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Seattle
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    I know how that goes. Thanks.

  5. #15
    Member
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    Jun 2011
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    Piedmont NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramblinrev View Post
    Many people find bedsheets too short for a comfortable long term hammock. Not saying they don't work, just too short for me and some others.
    Probably so, for a gathered-end hammock. However, I used a king-size sheet that was 120" long (10 ft) and I didn't make it into a gathered-end or channel hammock. Instead I reinforced the ends and added 24 cords to each end to make Brazilian-style "harnesses" about 2-1/2 ft long, terminating in a loop at each end. Total 15 ft long when finished, with a 10 ft long fabric "bed". This method works great for me, but as you say, maybe not for some others

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