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  1. #31
    in it for the naps oldgringo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaleW View Post

    The idea for a Velcro bug screen had occurred to me. I would have Velcro on the outside of the underquilt, so you could attach the screen to the quilt, or to the hammock body without the quilt in hot weather.
    That's how the Speer system works.

    When you're thinking like Ed Speer, you're doing some top tier thinking.
    Dave

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  2. #32
    DaleW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    If the insulation's weight manages to push the UC downward more than the insulations ability to loft up and fill the space between the UC and hammock, there might be a problem. And more so if the UC is not very well sealed at all edges and the end, leaving an open path for cold air to flow downward and fill that even very small gap between your back and the insulation. Both the distance between the weighted ( with insulation) UC- after laying in the hammock- and the amount/loft of the added insulation will have either be just right- or adjustable. Obviously can be done with Velcro or snaps, but it will need to be pretty custom.

    A Speer PeaPod- when fully or mostly closed- is supported by the nylon cords that tie it to the ends of the hammock, AND by the top side Velcro closure along the entire length. I adjust mine so that either, once I lay down, the bottom inside is barely in contact with my back, or if I want to add a jacket something for more loft, it has an inch or 3 gap after I lay down, but before adding extra insulation. ( or an unfilled gap if it is kind of warm out) That means I either start out with a 4-6" gap between the pod and un-occupied hammock, or more if I plan on adding something. if after I am in, I see that it is either too tight (compressing loft) or to loose with too much gap, I just get out and make one small adjustment on one end. Mostly, I never even have to do this. Once all of this is done, it will stay put due to the non-elastic end cords and the full length Velcro closure, pretty much ending any worries of any thru the night sag. Also, as it is cinched tight around the hammock on the ends, and closed as tightly as desired along the top, with thick loft draping over the hammock edges and down onto the user, there really won't be any cold air rushing in to fill any unintended gap under your back.

    True it is added on, but it sure has been bomb proof, on more than one brand of hammock, for me. I just has not failed me up to 10F below it's rated temps, with addition of either puffy clothing or a 40-50F TQ and a space blanket below.

    The insulated hammocks are interesting concepts, though they have all been DIY. That will save the weight of one layer of nylon. Just a larger layer of nylon sewn to the hammock and filled with insulating material. But venting in warm weather MIGHT be a problem, I suppose?
    The Speer system is the bast I've seen so far.

    Understood on the support/weight/loft issues. The UC would be sealed (sewn) on all sides and would be on the deep side. My plan is to have perpendicular channels with light shock cord and toggles, so the depth could be adjusted. Using Garlington Insulators or variants would be easy. Down would need some suspension from the bottom of the hammock so it could hang freely. I think synthetic fills could be used for a big flat quilt and just sit in the UC. Getting high up the sides is the challenge.

    I'm thinking super light stuff like Pertex for the UC-- it really is a windshirt for the hammock. It needs to support it's own weight plus a couple space blankets. From there it needs help with suspension from the hammock body.

  3. #33
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    Did any new, innovative, modular designs ever come of this thread? It came up in a search I did, and I must say, it was a great thought provoking read and I thought it was worth reviving a year and a half later...

    I must say, our passtime of hammocking has really evolved into something cutting edge. Hammocks used to just be a length of whatever fabric was on hand gathered at the ends and tied to two trees in warmer weather. Now, we can sleep comfortably with all of our gadgets and gizmo's down to -26F.

    I believe this thread indicates that we are at a crossroads when it comes to hammock gear, technology, and innovation. There is a demand for simpler, easier to use, "idiot-proof" designs, and this seems to go against the mind-set of the man Do-It-Yourselfers that we have on this forum. I must say, I've always been amazed by the resourcefulness of the members here. I'm sure that we will come up with something that will work for most.

    Great thread, thanks,

    JGON

  4. #34
    MAD777's Avatar
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    Separate components = flexibility
    Separate components = complexity

    hmmmm...
    Mike
    "Life is a Project!"

  5. #35
    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
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    Lots of great thoughts and insights in the thread, here. I know this is slightly necro ("Arise, Ancient Thread! Arise!" *cough* *hack* *cough*...durned booming hollow voice always hurts my throat...), but I'm in the midst of hacking at modular quilts (both top and bottom) right now. My first layer, full-length IX, is just about done and has been tested recently.

    I've been musing on draft skirts, and I think it's hard to beat Youngblood's design for the ends. Requires no modification to the hammock proper and will add only ~1-2 oz of weight at most to the quilt.

    I've tried a Velcro attachment, differentially-cut IX underquilt layer, and it works pretty well so far. Not quite what I was hoping for on temperature range, but I think part of that is air intrusion at the ends; there're slight gaps at either end between the quilt edge and the bottom of the hammock. So, draft skirts.

    The next layer (down) should be pretty easy to engineer; it's 2/3 length at most (torso and upper thigh) and should get me down to 20-ish. Building draft stoppers onto one that length should be easier than with the full length; the IX layer is pretty smooth on the outside. We'll see...
    "Just prepare what you can and enjoy the rest."
    --Floridahanger

  6. #36
    WV's Avatar
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    One issue that all underquilts must deal with is having them fit against the bottom of the hammock all the way across - not just at the edges. Air gaps under the knees have been a problem for many who use full length underquilts. I like full length quilts, myself, but I recognize that they're not perfect. Note, if you DIY, remember that the heavier the quilt is, the harder it is to make it fit tight evenly.

  7. #37
    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WV View Post
    One issue that all underquilts must deal with is having them fit against the bottom of the hammock all the way across - not just at the edges. Air gaps under the knees have been a problem for many who use full length underquilts. I like full length quilts, myself, but I recognize that they're not perfect. Note, if you DIY, remember that the heavier the quilt is, the harder it is to make it fit tight evenly.
    Most definitely. That issue I've addressed by making the IX a little narrower than the hammock proper (I had assistance in measuring my personal size in the hammock here, so it matches the half-(or slightly more, actually)circumference of my body in the hammock as it sags.

    However, that's resulted in a slight change in the hammock lie; it's become a little more like an "hard" bed rather than a "soft" one. Since the first layer is IX, though, and there's ~2 inches of play in the side attachment points, total, this matters less than if I was compressing down in the first layer with no play in the suspension.

    A bigger issue is the air intrusion at the ends; this is where I think I currently need to put effort forth. We'll see if a wind-blocking piece of skirt with some shock cord here will do the trick...here's hoping...
    "Just prepare what you can and enjoy the rest."
    --Floridahanger

  8. #38
    Senior Member Rolloff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JGON View Post
    Did any new, innovative, modular designs ever come of this thread? It came up in a search I did, and I must say, it was a great thought provoking read and I thought it was worth reviving a year and a half later...

    I must say, our passtime of hammocking has really evolved into something cutting edge. Hammocks used to just be a length of whatever fabric was on hand gathered at the ends and tied to two trees in warmer weather. Now, we can sleep comfortably with all of our gadgets and gizmo's down to -26F.

    I believe this thread indicates that we are at a crossroads when it comes to hammock gear, technology, and innovation. There is a demand for simpler, easier to use, "idiot-proof" designs, and this seems to go against the mind-set of the man Do-It-Yourselfers that we have on this forum. I must say, I've always been amazed by the resourcefulness of the members here. I'm sure that we will come up with something that will work for most.

    Great thread, thanks,

    JGON


    Dutch Hammock clips?
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