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  1. #1
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    Made a Super Nano - need some tree huggers

    Made a Super Nano. At least that is what I am calling it.
    The same size as a Nano, slightly longer only 2 layers of 1.1 oz digital camo ripstop.

    I like it but I have not tried it out yet.

    It is actually just 2 1.1 oz hammocks whipped together so I can insert a pad.

    8.4oz for the hammock alone, whipped.

    At any rate I am going to go whoopie slings. Have some amsteel line
    and need some SUL tree huggers.

    What do you suggest ??

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    I dont think there really is a lighter option than 1" poly webbing ,you might get away with 3/4 inch but imo thats so small you could just go ahead and use a rope tree hugger with trail sticks inserted under it vertically every few inches ..


    Nice idea on just whipping the two hammocks together to get a DL i'd be interested to hear how it works out over some time though i cant see why it wouldnt

  3. #3
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    In a video clip somewhere, you'll find a hammocker, maybe a Brit, carefully placing several twigs under the rope he's suspended the hammock from, as he says to distribute the load more broadly (and in fact, that's smart; even if the max psi were the same, he's not cutting off as much flow in the tree tissue layers).

    That's some extra, but no-weight fiddling. You could, however, have shorter than average pads which captured longer than average whoopie slings to distribute load, just as the adjustable shoulder pads on your backpack do. Say two feet long rather than six, but stiffer strapping; with a couple of pieces of combined male/female Velcro sewn to them at as few as two places.

    • Hang the hammock loosely with just the whoopie slings.
    • Slip the pads/straps between trees and whoopies and fold the Velcro over to keep the sling positioned over them.
    • Adjust whoopie sling length.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by DemostiX View Post
    . You could, however, have shorter than average pads which captured longer than average whoopie slings to distribute load, just as the adjustable shoulder pads on your backpack do. Say two feet long rather than six, but stiffer strapping; with a couple of pieces of combined male/female Velcro sewn to them at as few as two places.
    I'm not the OP but this sounds good! However if the pads are just webbing i doubt they would do much and i fail to imagine a substantial enough material that wouldnt make this heavier than webbing tree straps/huggers !?


    I wouldnt make the setup one piece if you want to use a whoopies sling , of course you can just go with a (U)CR suspension or all the way back to knots
    If you do make your setup one piece you're better of inverting the whoopie slings so you have the fix end on the tree side and thus just one length of rope going around your tree , though this will give you a longer minimum tree distance with smaller trees or problems tying the loose end back to the standing part (slipped buntline hitch might do well) .

  5. #5
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    I use 4ft 1" straps and carry two dynaglide suspension extensions and in the past two years I have maybe used the extensions a half-dozen times (probably less) thats about 8 trips with each lasting around 3-5 days, this was all primarily on the AT!

    I have a set of 2ft and 3ft ft straps and most times I find myself packing the 4's! I have taken the 2's out and have almost always had to use the extension's, but then I have to find trail sticks and place them in-between the tree and extension to not damage the tree with the dynaglide extension, also finding tree's that the 2's can fit around and are proper distance away, and not a lot of crap under the hammock, and more I found they became more of a problem for me! The 3's were pretty much the same as the two's but slightly less time having to use the extensions! All in all, I found a happy medium with the 4's!

    For a SUL rig you could just use 7/64th amsteel (or dynaglide) and tie marlin spikes using trail sticks every 6-8" or so for tree protection and just wrap that around the tree!
    Formerly known as "Cranky Bear"....

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  6. #6
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by utilisateur View Post
    I'm not the OP but this sounds good! However if the pads are just webbing i doubt they would do much and i fail to imagine a substantial enough material that wouldnt make this heavier than webbing tree straps/huggers !?


    I wouldnt make the setup one piece if you want to use a whoopies sling , of course you can just go with a (U)CR suspension or all the way back to knots
    If you do make your setup one piece you're better of inverting the whoopie slings so you have the fix end on the tree side and thus just one length of rope going around your tree , though this will give you a longer minimum tree distance with smaller trees or problems tying the loose end back to the standing part (slipped buntline hitch might do well) .
    Let me encourage your imagination, even though Cranky Bears subsequent post and extensive experience with another solution makes me wonder if it really is worth it: Find a piece of luggage and put 100 lbs in. Now lift it from the floor with a 7/64" whoopie sling as a strap and put it on your shoulder. Painful to think of? It would be great if there were engineers here with instrumentation. My guess is that trees would be as much protected by thick, light, low tensile strength felt pads as your shoulder would like to feel those pads instead of the the thin Amsteel. Much of the issue here is the consequence of discovering and using line that is about the thickness of equal-strength steel wire.

    Elsewhere, I've reported joy, for local and car use, with straps made of Samson's cheapest hollow single braid polyprop "utility"1/2" rope, which isn't too heavy for the car, and which flattens to 3/4" against the tree. The reel I saw said "Made in Mexico" No more expensive than shipped straps, and a much brighter Carribean coral blue. <smile>

    But, more, I liked meeting at mid-century, the guy in New Egypt, NJ, who ran a metals scrap yard (near the auto race track) and lent me a scissors and pointed to the cars in the yard to harvest seat-belt strapping from junkers.
    "We're both green, in the recycling business." he said. "Careful for bees, and any car you see except that Camaro."
    Last edited by DemostiX; 07-30-2011 at 12:11.

  7. #7
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    We should check for the results of the research that has been ordered by the european? federation of slacklining , afaik they checked for the dammage made by the tree huggers that are used in slacklining (alot larger than hammock ones)
    distributing the pressure with a felt pad under it and other solutions.
    Its common practise to pre-tension the line so the forces are different, but the results of the research should still be interesting!



    EDIT : The diverse research projects are apparently not finished , but what is popping up again and again is a minimum strap width of 5cm (~2") for slacklining and the importance of avoiding a complete encirclement of the tree by the strap -> no girth hitching .
    Also the recommendation of spreading the load with vertical sticks or similar. <- this is to be seen with reservation because of the higher punctual load that can damage the bark though it does relieve the cambium

    The needed surface area is of course relative to the force so the half metric ton force of a hammock wont need the same as a + 3metric ton slackline- but i thought a clever vertical force distribution with sticks or ?? might be interesting on trees with a strong bark ..
    I have only been usign girth-hitched 1" straps most of the time ..
    The force distribution through the bark is of course different from tree to tree , but it would be great to know in what ballpark the force/area can be without leading to damage ...

    Demostix : My shoulder is not a tree so though i'm totally with you there i cant judge it with sufficient certainity ..
    Last edited by utilisateur; 07-30-2011 at 17:28.

  8. #8
    Mr. Arrowhead pgibson's Avatar
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    Slack lining is a totally different kind of world than Hammocks. I used to do a little and had a friend that got vey series in it. He would cross 100 lines over small canyons. The slack lines are tensioned with 1000's of pounds of force on the lines with everything all the way up to come-alongs big enough to move semi trucks. The goal is to get nearly all of the slack and stretch out of the line to be walked. Hammocks don't apply even a fraction of the forces on the webbing...even if you hang with your suspension as flat as possible.
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  9. #9
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    Anybody got a link to the appropriate 1" poly webbing. I see poly pro on quest but not sure if that is what I need and they have 2 different weights.

    I have been using harbor freight webbing from a tie down kit, but want to lose some weight.

  10. #10
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    Several of the vendor's here on HF sell webbing! AHE, Whoopieslings.com, and JRB just to name a few (there are others)! Many of these places will custom make the straps as long or as short as you want, but some will not!
    Formerly known as "Cranky Bear"....

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