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  1. #1
    Senior Member bwg's Avatar
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    Bicycle as Portable Hammock Stand

    Thought some of you bicycle tourists may find this useful for those situations when two trees or poles are not adequately spaced for hanging a hammock. I use my bicycle as a portable one-tree hammock stand. Perhaps others have demonstrated something similar in previous posts, if so I failed to find those in my search. “Dan The Man” illustrated something similar to form a bivy with a hammock and posted images at bikeforums.net:

    http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...=1#post7659107

    Items needed include:

    1. 15 to 20 feet of suitable strap or cord
    2. Sufficiently strong stakes
    3. Tree strap

    Supplemental items include

    4. Cord to build picket holdfast with stakes
    5. Descending rings

    Since I have whoopie slings I find it easier to use a separate strap to create the bicycle stand. The whoopie slings seem to be more difficult to use when taut. I use a strap that is about 20 feet long. One end is sewed with a loop and with that I form a Lark’s head knot (Cow hitch) which I form over one end of my gathered end hammock. I then wrap strap around bicycle seat post (or seat rails for more elevation) then use it form a guy line to a tree strap which I have linked to two stakes. The stakes I form in a modified picket holdfast. I use 12” aluminum stakes (weight about 3oz each) which can be found at campmor.com.

    Attached images show the bicycle forms a portable one-end hammock stand.

    P.S. I use cord to lock both front and rear brakes so bike is prevented from rolling.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by bwg; 08-01-2011 at 08:27.

  2. #2
    Senior Member vinnya42's Avatar
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    Very cool! I would have liked to see you lay in it the first time...bet you let all your air out of your lungs to be just that much lighter. at least you only had a few inches to fall if it failed.

    Nice work!

    VInce
    Hang it high and God Bless!!

    Vince

  3. #3
    Senior Member SteelerNation's Avatar
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    I wouldn't think that the bike would hold up that well with all of those lateral forces on it. Do the straps somehow neutralize those forces, do you think, or is the frame taking some of the load?

    Interesting solution!

    SN
    Please visit my AmJustDuane YouTube channel

  4. #4
    Senior Member Jakerock's Avatar
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    Very cool! Three of my favorite things, bikes, hammocks, and adaptation!
    Thanks for posting!

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    clever. I like it. though to tell you the truth, I'd probably opt to have 2 or 3 straps going to the ground from the bike to make sure it's secure.

  6. #6
    Member aztech's Avatar
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    looks good, have you tried it out?

  7. #7
    Jsaults's Avatar
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    Cool idea!

    I don't see why ther would be any dangerous forces on the bike's frame - The force exerted on the diagonal to the ground anchor is balanced out by the force in the hammock, resulting in a "down" force at the seatpost. And if my math is correct, the down force should be equal to the weight of the rider. Just do your best to leep the bike in an upright position.

    Jim
    I'm gonna try it!

  8. #8
    Senior Member bwg's Avatar
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    Not sure I would try it with a carbon frame, but with steel I have no hesitation.

    Multiple straps not really necessary if the strap is well staked (and if one has confidence the strap won't break -- if it does break, bike crashes upon one's head). Again, I do emphasize that bike brakes should be locked to prevent rolling. In my second image one can see that I have the brakes tied with paracord in the braking position to the handlebars.

    Yes, I have tried it and it works. One difficulty, however, is that the tarp ridge-line will sag once one enters the hammock. Tarp-tensioners on the sides help adjust such sag; adding a tarp tensioner or shock/bungee cord on the end adjacent the bike would also help address tarp sag.

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