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  1. #1
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    Lengthening Hammock

    Has anyone ever added length to a hammock or constructed their hammock of different colored rip-stop? If so, what seam did you use and were you comfortable with the strength? Or is this totally not recommended?

  2. #2
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    Do you really mean length? I have added width by adding panels to each side of the main body. Many commercial hammocks do the same using a flat felled seam. Diy options include a top-stitched french seam if you don't want to try to manage the true flat felled.

    Adding length would be easier simply by getting a longer piece of material.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member hippofeet's Avatar
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    It would be tough for me to sew that so there was not a stiffer ridge at the seam, regardless of how I did it. I would almost be tempted to sew them overlapped an inch, 2 lines of stitch, and overcast the raw material ends with the widest zigzag stitch. That would give strength, without concentrating it in one line of tight stitches. Ramblinrev is 100% right about just getting a new, longer piece of fabric, but sure, you can do it.http://www.burdastyle.com/techniques...at-felled-seam
    Last edited by hippofeet; 08-03-2011 at 13:34.
    An emergency of my own making...is still an emergency.

  4. #4
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hippofeet View Post
    It would be tough for me to sew that so there was not a stiffer ridge at the seam, regardless of how I did it. I would almost be tempted to sew them overlapped an inch, 2 lines of stitch, and overcast the raw material ends with the widest zigzag stitch. That would give strength, without concentrating it in one line of tight stitches. Ramblinrev is 100% right about just getting a new, longer piece of fabric, but sure, you can do it.http://www.burdastyle.com/techniques...at-felled-seam
    There has been discussion and some conflicting opinions about the viability of seams that run perpendicular to the center line of the hammock. Some folks have expressed concern that the stresses on the seam would be too great. Others believe it is a viable option. I have had mixed experiences. When I have sewn a line of stitching across the hammock, such as attaching a pocket or such I have not had a failure. However When I have tried to actually join two pieces of fabric across the hammock it has not been successful. Feel free to try it using the above mentioned seams but as always, do not hang higher than you are willing to fall.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
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  5. #5

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    While making my first hammock, I accidentally cut my cloth a foot too short. (the rule for sewing should be measure thrice, cut once!) I decided to sew the material (1.1oz ripstop nylon) back in using 3/4" flat-felled seams. The seams still hold my 215 lbs, though you can see light through the material on either side of the seams. The fact that the patch is near the end of the hammock, hence gathered together, probably helps. I would hesitate to try a seam in the middle of the hammock.

  6. #6
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    The felled seam option is what I was thinking. I was also thinking it makes more sense to get a new, longer piece of fabric. I just wondered if others had done some experimentation with this in the past. Sounds like some have with mixed success. Thanks for the options.

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