View Poll Results: How do you tie the ends of your DIY hammocks?

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  • I pull out about 4 inches before tieing / whipping

    6 28.57%
  • I pull out more than 4 inches before tying / whipping

    0 0%
  • I pull out less than 4 inches but more than zero before tying

    10 47.62%
  • I don't pull out any before tying / whipping

    6 28.57%
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  1. #11
    Member AlabamaDan's Avatar
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    What did you make your hammock and cover out of? Looks nice. Would you mind sharing more about the hows for a newbie?

  2. #12
    Mule's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlabamaDan View Post
    What did you make your hammock and cover out of? Looks nice. Would you mind sharing more about the hows for a newbie?
    Sure, This is just my way, probably not the best way. Made of DWR, lightweight stuff.
    Once you get the hammock just like you like it, pads or quilts in place and hanging like you like it and the pull-outs where you want them, stretch a length of shock cord from the two places near the carabiners where you want your cover to begin. If you use a ridgeline, that would be even better. I don't use a ridgeline once I have finished the cover.
    Measure from your pullout connect point to the top of the ridgeline or bungee. Do both sides to be sure, Mine was a total of sixty two inches from the tip of one tie out to the one on the other side after going over the ridgeline. Mine were not asymetric but were centered. Length was 92 inches from knot to knot the long way.
    I cut out the fabric leaving two inches for hems, so the overall width was over 94 inches because the inch for each seam is taken from the edges, not the points. ie. if you were making a 45 degree angle, a 90 degree included angle at the tips where the tie outs are, you would end up with about 1.4 times the one inch seam allowance on the very tip of the fabric, each end.
    I sewed velcro to the hammock that would utilize my SSF under quilt's velcro. So I sewed the opposite velcro to the lid, or cover. This makes attaching the cover to the hammock easy. But my already made sock, or weather cover had velcro loop on one side and velcro hook on the other so I can close it off from withing the hammock. That means that one edge of the sock won't be the correct loop or hook to attach to the hammock or the lid, so I made a piece of velcro that had hooks on both sides times about 8 feet long to put on the one side that would not match up, a sort of adaptor. Had I been using Omni that sticks to itself no matter what I would not have had to do this. Next one will be omni stuff.
    After fitting the lid to the lower sock, the configuration was: hammock attached to SSF, and hammock sock attached to hammock sock lid. (The sock adjusts with a cord in a tunnel on each end and is supported just like a JRB underquilt, with shock cord). Finally I sewed a patch of velcro to the lower sock that was about 18 inches from the long end, did this in four places. I put the top back on with the under sock and marked where the opposite velcro should go and sewed three inch lengths of the opposite hook and loop to the lid. These get closed so that the lid doesn't come completely unattached to the sock when getting in and out of the hammock.
    I then sewed grossgrain from those places where the velcro was on the lid to the opposite side of the lid in a straight line as the lid is laid out on the floor to hold loops and closed end loops used to hold a spreader bar on each end like a claytor. Attached the spreader bars and shock cord to the center loop like a Claytor and hung them from about the same place on the tree (garage) as the hammock straps are hung.
    There you have it. You can see the Claytor style grossgrain in my lates thread called "Hungry Anaconda-maximus skins".
    Let me know if I can help you further. Mule
    There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and the enemy. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion.
    Gen. William Thornson, U.S. Army

  3. #13
    Senior Member GREEN THERAPY's Avatar
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    Just came inside from the back field after a partial nite of testing a hammock cover made from DWR ripstop. I left a ventilation hole in the nose end in the hopes that I would not have any condensation issues. Unfortunately my hopes were not realized, huge condenstaion problem. Will have to modify the top cover with breathable material to make it usable. Temp was 37 F and other than the condensation issue was very comfy. I have one that is built from a water repellent fabric and is a lot more breathable that I am going to go give a try. Used one last weekend made from polyester with no condensation issues at around 34 F. See if I can get two out of three. The second test worked great. Temp dropped to 32F with no issues. To steal a line from a song....... two out of three ain't bad.
    Last edited by GREEN THERAPY; 03-27-2008 at 06:04. Reason: second test
    What I lack in knowledge I MORE than make up for with opinions.
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by GREEN THERAPY View Post
    Just came inside from the back field after a partial nite of testing a hammock cover made from DWR ripstop. I left a ventilation hole in the nose end in the hopes that I would not have any condensation issues. Unfortunately my hopes were not realized, huge condenstaion problem. Will have to modify the top cover with breathable material to make it usable. Temp was 37 F and other than the condensation issue was very comfy. I have one that is built from a water repellent fabric and is a lot more breathable that I am going to go give a try. Used one last weekend made from polyester with no condensation issues at around 34 F. See if I can get two out of three. The second test worked great. Temp dropped to 32F with no issues. To steal a line from a song....... two out of three ain't bad.
    Was there any difference in humidity between the time it worked and didn't? It looks like the humidity in your area was pretty close to 100% last night, maybe that made the difference and not the breathability of the fabric? Was there any condensation on your tarp, or just inside the cover? I'm just speculating, condensation issues continue to puzzle me...

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by GREEN THERAPY View Post
    Just came inside from the back field after a partial nite of testing a hammock cover made from DWR ripstop. I left a ventilation hole in the nose end in the hopes that I would not have any condensation issues. Unfortunately my hopes were not realized, huge condenstaion problem. Will have to modify the top cover with breathable material to make it usable. Temp was 37 F and other than the condensation issue was very comfy. I have one that is built from a water repellent fabric and is a lot more breathable that I am going to go give a try. Used one last weekend made from polyester with no condensation issues at around 34 F. See if I can get two out of three. The second test worked great. Temp dropped to 32F with no issues. To steal a line from a song....... two out of three ain't bad.
    Meat Loaf... "Bat Out Of Hell" album?

    When I have read others accounts of condensation issues where the results is a particular scheme doesn't have condensation issues and another scheme does have condensation issues... like one passes a test and another doesn't... I usually see it as both schemes did exactly what they were suppose to do and the problem was the expectations.

    You need different levels of breathability, porosity, or what ever the proper name is, depending on the conditions. Temperature, wind, how much moist vapor you are creating, what is the relative humidity of the air, etc all play a huge role in what you want or need. And that changes from time to time. Sometimes in can change drastically in the course of one night when a weather system moves through or two weather systems collide.

    Even something as porous as a bugnet can have a huge effect. I have used a bugnet when it made me feel like I was in a sauna and just opening it slightly gave a huge relief. I have used a bugnet when the added warmth it trapped and the reduction to the wind that was hitting me was great. I have used a bugnet when it felt like it was leaking air like a sieve and I wished it was rip stop nylon or something that trapped some air/heat. But in each case the bugnet was doing exactly what it was suppose to do... if there where any issues they where with my hopes/expectations/wishes/needs/requirements. .
    Youngblood AT2000

  6. #16
    Mule's Avatar
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    As of yet I have never had a condensation problem with DWR. Cerebus reported the same. Hugh?
    There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and the enemy. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion.
    Gen. William Thornson, U.S. Army

  7. #17
    Senior Member GREEN THERAPY's Avatar
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    Yes to Meat Loaf and bat outa hell.... great album.

    The weather was clear sky and temp dropping. The tarp was dry with no condensation on it at all. The condensation was directly over my face getting less towards my feet and the head end of the hammock.

    I agree as to expectations Young Blood, and my expectation with this set up was to have good wind blockage and heat retention for cold temps. Perhaps at temps in the mid to low 50'sF this DWR setup would have no issues. I live on the West ( AKA WET ) coast of Canada and humidity is usually high all winter.

    I just finished another sock with the same DWR on the bottom and bug mesh on the top and will test that one tonite. Will close off the top with scrap DWR and see at what point it has issues. The first one with DWR top and bottom is back on the drawing board and am thinking of adding a 6 or 7 inch wide strip the length of the ridge.

    I have two solid top hammock covers with breathable material and both have no issues in the same weather conditions as the DWR did. Not sure if the DWR was keeping me any warmer than they were. If so it was marginal.

    The goal is the end.... the pleasure is the journey, the rewards are the memories and friends met along the way.
    What I lack in knowledge I MORE than make up for with opinions.
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  8. #18
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    My first backpacking tent was a 2 person Sierra Design tent that I can't recall the name of, but it was one of the finest of that era and set me back what seemed like an incredible sum at that time. It had a separate fly that pitched close to the ground and a bathtub floor. It also had an extra layer of less breathable material that zippered over the mesh for the door. That material was used to change the breathablity when you wanted the tent to feel warmer. It had an effect just as opening the door or opening up the fly over the door had when things were too warm. Seems like in those days some 4 season tents had larger areas like that, where you zipped or attached some less breathable material over the mesh bugnet material.

    A few years later they started adding top vents that you could open and close in the flys themselves to aid in venting when you needed it. At some point you have to think about flexibility with your ventilation when you start enclosing yourself with material to retain some body heat and how much complexity, weight, etc that flexibility is worth.

    The last tent I purchased before I started hammocking was a Stephenson 2R tent that has seen a lot of use. Most of that use has been by buddies borrowing it for trips they make. When I bought that I was fully immersed in ultra light weight backpacking and used that in the winter when sleeping on the ground with a tarp just wasn't going to hack it. That tent is an expensive silnylon tent with the following options that all cost money and add weight. A double wall of silnylon over the main body of the tent to add warmth. A door with zippers along 3 sides for easier entry and better venting. Large window on both sides for better venting when it is too hot.

    Notice that it is double walled to add warmth but has a more complexity in the door and large side windows to cool it off. Those have all been well worth it... but not at the same time. Those probably added $100 or so to the cost and 8 ounces or so to the weight. Sometimes added complexity and weight are worth it and sometimes they aren't... you have to think all of that through and hope you didn't mess up too bad in your figuring, but sometimes you will. You can't really know until you get some experience with things or have had enough experience with similar setups that you are just dialing in what you want.
    Youngblood AT2000

  9. #19
    Senior Member GREEN THERAPY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Youngblood View Post
    You can't really know until you get some experience with things or have had enough experience with similar setups that you are just dialing in what you want.
    Very true words YB. I am a relatively new convert to hammocks and have gone the route of the HH for a first hammock in June of 2007.

    Did the try different pads thing, struggle to get in the bottom slit and then wrestle to make my bed trying to keep the pads and sleeping bag oriented in some fashion. Soon came to the conclusion that a top entry was for me as I have shoulder problems ( rotator cuff ) and the HH wrestle agrivated it no end. Bought a sewing machine and was off on the getting experience journey.

    Made a few that whipped two hammocks together with the bug net sewn to one side and a zippered top entry and tryed putting the pad between the two and the sleeping bag in the hammock. They worked well enough untill winter, then the bag under compression in the hammock was cold to sleep with.

    I think that winter camping at or below freezing is a trade off on some extra weight to accomadate comfort and safety. I think I have started to dial in on what I want with a free floating hammock that a modified bag slips over and a lightweight hammock cover with a bug net sewn to one side and zipper entry on the other. By cutting a breathable top cover of 1.1 oz or less ripstop that can be fastened over the netting the set up can be used four seasons.

    I have modified both down filled and synthetic bags with great sucsess and by adding a couple of zippers to the modified cuts the bags revert back to regular bags when not in a hammock. There is an amazingly warm foot box created by the mod and this was a surprising bonus and not part of a master plan.

    Experience by usage has told me this will work wonderfully for a four season set up and the last piece of the puzzle is getting the correct materials. I am using a limited selection Wal Mart as my source of fabric so far and for experimenting has been the way to go. I am now looking at some other slightly more expensive sources with very interesting fabric selections.

    Will end this rant that is almost totally off topic in this thread with the following. Currently there are few off the shelf economical hammock set ups. I can see in the not too distant future someone coming up with the idea of the following:

    1) Net less hammock which allows a sleeping bag to slip over it. Cost approx 60 to 80 dollars or less.

    2) Depending on the composition of the modified bag and the season its used in all the insualtion one will need. Cost - 30 to 300 dollars.

    3) Lightweight hammock cover with excess material cut away and top entry bug net attached and optional solid fly for winter. Cost approx 80 to 100 dollars.


    To those that make quilts try sewing a top and bottom together on one side, try the mod I have described and have pics of in my gallery, add a zipper with a strap style pull on the hardware and sell me one.

    These are not a cataloge of what I am selling...... rather what I project someone will. Mule is making hammock covers and is close to what I have described.

    To keep on thread....... I whip my hammocks with the ends flush.
    Last edited by GREEN THERAPY; 03-28-2008 at 02:01. Reason: always one more thought
    What I lack in knowledge I MORE than make up for with opinions.
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  10. #20
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    I have made two hammocks now...one I destroyed (the original) on a brief but fast flight to terra ferma which was done Speer style...pulling a few inches and the one I use now (made of Polyester) I layed out flat, folded down 12" on the right side and went to 0" on the left all this done at the head end gathered streight across and whipped ...and on the foot end I folded down 12" on the left side and went to 0" on the right side, gathered streight across and whipped. The result is a "flop" side asym wana be...I have no sewing machine (had a very busy seamstress hem my material) so I still need to put side tie outs...I have them marked on the fabric but still have to have that done.
    Alex Williams
    Acts 10:13 "Arise Peter, Kill and Eat."
    Job 14:15 "Call upon Me and I shall answer you."
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