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Thread: Underquilts

  1. #1
    New Member wannahang's Avatar
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    Underquilts

    Just bought my first hammock (WBBB Single 1.7) and have a question regarding insulation. I know at some point there is a definate need for an underquilt, but provided you have ample coverage on the topside, would it be safe to go without an underquilt during the fall before it starts gettting below freezing? Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Raul Perez's Avatar
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    General rule... you will need some sort of insulation under you for temps 70*F and below be it an underquilt or pad.
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    Dutch's Avatar
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    I need something under me below 70 degrees. That can be a fleece or a pad at first. I thru'd the entire AT with just a pad. Don't try anything under 60 or you will freeze.
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    Burning at both ends Dblcorona's Avatar
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    I used an UQ at 60. Amazing how fast it cools off under you. Also when using an UQ, that translates to less you have to put on top.
    "We don't stop hiking because we grow old,
    we grow old because we stop hiking."

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    gargoyle's Avatar
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    Most folks need something as bottom insulation. Any temps below 70, especially if theres a breeze, demand some kind of thermal barrier.
    Even if you lay on your sleeping bag, you compress the insulation and render it useless to a point.
    If you have a pad, it'll work. They can be squirmy and hard to keep in place. A closed cell foam pad is cheap. An inflatable pad works too, just inflate it slightly, to allow the pad to bend with the contours of your body.
    Pads can make the lay of the hammock different, some like it, some don't.
    Pads can also lead to a condensation problem on your back.
    Most folks start with a pad for the economy. Then upgrade to a uq as $ allows.
    Ambulo tua ambulo.

  6. #6
    Member wildgene's Avatar
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    As a newbie 2 years ago I started with just a closed-cell foam pad (3/4" Evazote foam) and it was good until 60 degrees like others have mentioned. But boy does your butt and everything else on your backside feel like ice even when you're nowhere close to freezing temps. It's a real eye-opener first time in a hammock at a seemingly mild night time temp - try it home in the backyard and you'll see.

    Added in a Insultex UQ rather quickly after first trip - a cheap upgrade. Then followed it this year with a down UQ. Still use the closed foam cell pad since it's part of my backpack as a virtual frame - becomes extra insurance in case I guess wrong on night time temps and need to add it to any of my two UQs.

  7. #7
    Senior Member catalyst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wannahang View Post
    Just bought my first hammock (WBBB Single 1.7) and have a question regarding insulation. I know at some point there is a definate need for an underquilt, but provided you have ample coverage on the topside, would it be safe to go without an underquilt during the fall before it starts gettting below freezing? Thanks in advance!
    I learned the hard way and froze one night when temps dipped lower than I anticipated. I didn't bring the UQ or a pad along.

    If money is a factor with the UQ definitely take a look at Arrowhead Equipments Jarbridge River quilt here. For $80, it's hard not to get one. Just a thought.
    The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy."

  8. #8
    Senior Member griesl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catalyst81 View Post
    I learned the hard way and froze one night when temps dipped lower than I anticipated. I didn't bring the UQ or a pad along.

    If money is a factor with the UQ definitely take a look at Arrowhead Equipments Jarbridge River quilt here. For $80, it's hard not to get one. Just a thought.
    That's a steal for an underquilt. I clicked through to check it out, but I can't find specs on it. Do you know what it weighs and how it packs? Thanks.

  9. #9

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    http://arrowheadequipment.webs.com/a...s/show/1902885

    You have to click on the name. For some reason there is no picture. I picked one up a couple of months ago, before the big sale, but I am still loving it. It weighs about 20 oz. It is extremely well made. It is about a 3/4 length, which means you will probably want a small pad for your feet, but not much. It is my first underquilt and I feel like I got a steal. It isn't as compressible as down, but it is light and very manageable. I have a feeling that a lot of people will be posting reviews here once they take delivery of the sale priced ones. Paul is a top quality vendor, also.

    EDIT: to get the sale deal, don't follow the link I posted above. That is just the description you were looking for. To purchase, go to "store" and then click "anniversary sale". (I also picked up triangle thingys at the same time. Helps a bit with the hanging)

  10. #10
    Acer's Avatar
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    I can and do hang in the living room of my house,,and when the air conditioning kicks on,,can feel the coolness from the vent,,cooling my backside to a chill and have to use somekind of a working UQ..so when your thinking of below 70 outside,,you will need a UQ of something,,under you be it pad system or a UQ..no matter what you put on top..now if your wiggling into a sleeping bag,,its up to your body,,as to how low you can go before your body's compression of the fill in the bag, causing your backside to cool down,,you have to do alittle experimentation to see what you can stand with a bag. just my 2 cents..but its all a learning curve of what you can personally withstand as to what the elements you will be encountering, What I have learned its better to play it safe and go with more,,call it overkill,,if ordering a underquilt,,as you can always vent it if you get to hot,,I would rather have more,,and be prepaired for the worst conditions than be uncomfortable.

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