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  1. #1
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    newbee needs help with eno suspension

    I have read that many folks here(experienced hangers) often suggest or have them selves changed the ENO suspension.
    I have an ENO double deluxe (big guy 6'1" 280) & I have been using the ENO tree straps but they sure do seemed to have stretched alot in 4 weeks.
    when other say change the suspension do they mean ditch the tree straps or the cord from the hammock with the heavy carabiner?
    Thanks for the help.

  2. #2
    Senior Member NewtonGT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fildogg View Post
    I have read that many folks here(experienced hangers) often suggest or have them selves changed the ENO suspension.
    I have an ENO double deluxe (big guy 6'1" 280) & I have been using the ENO tree straps but they sure do seemed to have stretched alot in 4 weeks.
    when other say change the suspension do they mean ditch the tree straps or the cord from the hammock with the heavy carabiner?
    Thanks for the help.
    you dont have to change everything. but whoopie slings seems to be the most popular thing here. its pretty simple to do. alot of info on it.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXlwPKoKw9Q

    like this vid. hope it helps
    Dale Gribble: I'm thinking, "new hammock." For me, laying and swaying in a hammock is like a steady morphine drip without the risk of renal failure.

    Randy : yea but just remember yer roots and where ya come from....you got Hennessy in yer blood son......

  3. #3
    Senior Member lymphocytosis's Avatar
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    The straps are the main enemy as they're made of nylon and stretch. Get yourself some made out of polyester or polypropylene. People switch to whoopies to make adjustments easier with the strap system.

    Whoopies are easy to make if you get yourself some Amsteel (most people use 7/64 size). The Amsteel runs about $0.21 a foot so you can make a set quite cheaply. The shipping on the rope is really the thing that makes it more expensive.

    I have a drawing going for a free set here if you'd like to enter.
    Just call me "Blood Disease"

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewtonGT View Post
    you dont have to change everything. but whoopie slings seems to be the most popular thing here. its pretty simple to do. alot of info on it.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXlwPKoKw9Q

    like this vid. hope it helps
    Great video! Thank you.
    So the whoopie sling attaches to the tree straps? How?
    Total rookie I know.
    Thanks

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by lymphocytosis View Post
    The straps are the main enemy as they're made of nylon and stretch. Get yourself some made out of polyester or polypropylene. People switch to whoopies to make adjustments easier with the strap system.

    Whoopies are easy to make if you get yourself some Amsteel (most people use 7/64 size). The Amsteel runs about $0.21 a foot so you can make a set quite cheaply. The shipping on the rope is really the thing that makes it more expensive.

    I have a drawing going for a free set here if you'd like to enter.
    Thanks for the lead on the drawing.

  6. #6
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    I made my own whoopies and use tube webbing, its awesome and simple to do.
    "Its ok... I have a hammock!"

  7. #7
    dejoha's Avatar
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    You definitely need to keep some tree strap, but upgrade from nylon to polyester -- something that won't stretch.

    If your straps are long enough, you don't need to use whoopie slings at all. In this way, the straps serve two roles: tree protection and suspension lines.

    A lot of people use the tree straps to create anchor points and then use the whoopie slings as the suspension line from the hammock to the webbing.

    A lot of hammocks often come with a small cord loop that is tied into a larks head knot. I like this loop and leave it in my hammock because it is gives you a close option for securing your hammock. I tie my whoopie sling to this loop and use them when I need them. If the distance between the trees is short enough, I can use the short loops directly to the webbing. One downside with whoopies is that they have a minimum distance --- they can only contract so small because the bury takes up almost 12 inches of length. Having that small loop in the end of the hammock lets you minimize the distance if you need it.

    I'm not sure if I explained that well or not. Maybe it's time for another illustration.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dejoha View Post
    You definitely need to keep some tree strap, but upgrade from nylon to polyester -- something that won't stretch.

    If your straps are long enough, you don't need to use whoopie slings at all. In this way, the straps serve two roles: tree protection and suspension lines.

    A lot of people use the tree straps to create anchor points and then use the whoopie slings as the suspension line from the hammock to the webbing.

    A lot of hammocks often come with a small cord loop that is tied into a larks head knot. I like this loop and leave it in my hammock because it is gives you a close option for securing your hammock. I tie my whoopie sling to this loop and use them when I need them. If the distance between the trees is short enough, I can use the short loops directly to the webbing. One downside with whoopies is that they have a minimum distance --- they can only contract so small because the bury takes up almost 12 inches of length. Having that small loop in the end of the hammock lets you minimize the distance if you need it.

    I'm not sure if I explained that well or not. Maybe it's time for another illustration.
    Whoopie tied to the original cord at the end of the hammock will provide more options than just the whoopie by its-self?
    How would you tie it?
    Thanks

  9. #9
    dejoha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fildogg View Post
    Whoopie tied to the original cord at the end of the hammock will provide more options than just the whoopie by its-self?
    How would you tie it?
    Thanks
    I'll try to explain again, but an illustration might be easier

    A lot of hammocks come stock with a cord looped at each end. The cord itself is often about 24 in (61 cm) long, and when tied in a loop, creates a 12 in (30 cm) loop . I re-tie this loop with a double fisherman's knot and then thread it back through the end channel to tie a larks head knot.

    I then attach my whoopie sling to this loop. I tie the whoopie sling to the loop with a larks head.

    How does this provide more options? In a few ways:

    1. As I mentioned before, depending on the distance between the trees and the diameter of the trees, I may have more tree webbing strap that provides enough suspension line that the whoopie slings are not needed (or not usable because they cannot contract small enough to gap the space between the hammock end and the webbing). With the short loop stub on the end of the hammock, I can create a toggle in the webbing with a Marlinspike Hitch and attach the loop on the knot of the hitch and be done. The whoopie sling is simply slid to the side, unused.

    2. With that stub loop (I'm still trying to figure out a name for it) on the end of the hammock, I can easily clip on an under quilt with a mini biner or use a toggle by slipping the under quilt shock cord up through the loop and then placing a small stick through the under quilt loop and pulling it taut (an illustration here would help too).

    I think the big advantage to me is #1. With a stub loop on the end, I can reach closer distances that the whoopie sling alone cannot.

    I'm not 100% sure that made much more sense. Maybe on my third try.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by dejoha View Post
    I'll try to explain again, but an illustration might be easier

    A lot of hammocks come stock with a cord looped at each end. The cord itself is often about 24 in (61 cm) long, and when tied in a loop, creates a 12 in (30 cm) loop . I re-tie this loop with a double fisherman's knot and then thread it back through the end channel to tie a larks head knot.

    I then attach my whoopie sling to this loop. I tie the whoopie sling to the loop with a larks head.

    How does this provide more options? In a few ways:

    1. As I mentioned before, depending on the distance between the trees and the diameter of the trees, I may have more tree webbing strap that provides enough suspension line that the whoopie slings are not needed (or not usable because they cannot contract small enough to gap the space between the hammock end and the webbing). With the short loop stub on the end of the hammock, I can create a toggle in the webbing with a Marlinspike Hitch and attach the loop on the knot of the hitch and be done. The whoopie sling is simply slid to the side, unused.

    2. With that stub loop (I'm still trying to figure out a name for it) on the end of the hammock, I can easily clip on an under quilt with a mini biner or use a toggle by slipping the under quilt shock cord up through the loop and then placing a small stick through the under quilt loop and pulling it taut (an illustration here would help too).

    I think the big advantage to me is #1. With a stub loop on the end, I can reach closer distances that the whoopie sling alone cannot.

    I'm not 100% sure that made much more sense. Maybe on my third try.
    Loads of great info...Thanks!!

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