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  1. #31
    Member steene's Avatar
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    Attached or seperate netting?

    What type is preferred by our Northwoods hangers?

    I have BWCAW experience with the Deer Flies, black flies and skeeters, but no hanging experience there. They are ruthless.

  2. #32
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    I hate bugs, no I really hate bugs. I would carty 3 lbs of netting if need be. Netting is a must for me in the season.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  3. #33
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    My nightmare experience ( bug wise) was in the high mountains of Wyoming. Mountains ( Wind Rivers) with lots of lakes as well as meadows continually soaked with snow melt. In June of 85, I was out there for 30 straight days with the National Outdoor Leadership School out of Lander. At least for the first week or so there was enough snow still on the ground and still cold enough that they didn't come out much. But once they did, oh boy. We were using tarps( no nets) and head nets. I had a beige Patagonia Pile Jacket, pretty thick. It was just sickening to think how it would be if I didn't have thick winter clothing, as I watched the sleeves seemingly turn black as they walked up and down, plunging their probiscus (sp?) in to the hilt, just barely failing to strike flesh. Then pulling out, walking a small distance and plunging again, ever hopeful of striking "oil". They reminded me of those small oil drilling rigs you see out west. I lived in thick clothing and the head net and stinking of deet. The biggest adventure was just trying to drop your drawers enough to take care of business without loosing a pint of blood from the skin of your *** or other nearby parts. But, still, this was probably about the only time I got bitten, between deet and thick or tight weaved nylon clothing and head nets. But, it was a 24/7 battle.

    They would get in your food and fly in your mouth while you tried to eat.

    I have mentioned before the June 27 snowstorm that soaked us all, pushed many to the verge of hypothermia, and broke a tree limb which punctured a friends tarp. But that storm was a blessing to me. As we tried to sleep that night. as it was just starting to rain, a friend commented on how it was like trying to sleep through the Indy 500,due to the mossy buzzing in your ears. But I woke up in the middle of the night with the tarp in my face, and was quickly aware of the quiet. Snow had collapsed the tarp on top of us, and the mosquitoes were out of business for several glorious days.

    I have been back many times since, to the exact same place, but always during the 1st week of Sept. Though I still take a little deet and a head net just in case, I have never seen the first mossy.

  4. #34
    Senior Member Splat's Avatar
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    I'd rather have it then not have it and need it.
    Splat

    "Well, it's one louder, isn't it?"

  5. #35
    Senior Member photomankc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    My nightmare experience ( bug wise) was in the high mountains of Wyoming. Mountains ( Wind Rivers) with lots of lakes as well as meadows continually soaked with snow melt
    Wyoming, Mountains, June........... Noted.

    I will say that I spent a few days in June in Idaho just west of Yellowstone. I had never seen mosquitoes like that in my life. We stayed in a cabin and in the evening hours you would have to run from the car to the door and you still got hit several times each trip. Every shaft of sunlight looked like one of those dream sequences where little puffs are floating in the air shimmering but it was really a nightmare of hordes of blood sucking demons set to pounce upon you the moment you emerged from any shelter.

    Something about pine trees too. If you were near a pine tree they were just unbearable. But near a hardwood there always seemed to be less of them.

  6. #36
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    June in Idaho just west of Yellowstone..........hordes of blood sucking demons
    Yeah, that's not very far as the crow flies from where they tried to drain our blood. They are probably demon cousins.

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