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  1. #11
    Oh-No's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Smyrna, DE
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    various homemade Speer type
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    10' X 11' Cuben
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaiden View Post
    Pan may be biased, but he's right. Spend $50 now and you won't have to buy it twice. check out his site.
    I'm with Pan & jaiden on this. Those blue tarps are heavy and bulky. OK for car camping but for backpacking the JRB 8X8 and 10X11 tarps, on sale, are the way to go. The sale price is such that I couldn't justify making my own ( and I make most of my gear) I'd buy a 10X11 if my wife didn't know how many tarps I already have.

  2. #12
    Senior Member froldt's Avatar
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    Jan 2008
    Location
    Kentucky
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    home-made
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    home-made
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter_pan View Post
    Square tarps are a great way to get adequate coverage, they will give full side wind protection when properly pitched and save a lot of weight or the tarp itself plus reduce lines and stakes from 6 or 4 to 2, even more savings.... they are easy to pitch and normally cost less than similiar size rectangular or hex tarps....Super solution for the light and fast set as well as the normally dry season hanger...Drawback, if they have one, is, if forced to hole up for a couple of days there is no exta room....How often does that happen?

    Look around there are square tarps currently available as light as 9 oz and as low as $50.
    Thanks for the input on the square tarps. This sort of backed up what I was initially thinking. It will be some time before I am out long/far enough that I'll have to hole up for a couple of days. Right now it's just looking like over-nighters or maybe a long weekend. Even then I'll be only a couple of hours from the car (at the most).

    Quote Originally Posted by jaiden View Post
    Pan may be biased, but he's right. Spend $50 now and you won't have to buy it twice. check out his site.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh-No View Post
    I'm with Pan & jaiden on this. Those blue tarps are heavy and bulky. OK for car camping but for backpacking the JRB 8X8 and 10X11 tarps, on sale, are the way to go. The sale price is such that I couldn't justify making my own ( and I make most of my gear) I'd buy a 10X11 if my wife didn't know how many tarps I already have.

    I picked up (literally, just picked up, not purchased) a blue tarp at the store today... way heavier than I imagined! Apparently the tarp I use for a groundcloth is much smaller than I imagined, or is just worn thin and doesn't weigh that much.

    Unfortunately, as a currently unemployed college student who is going to be married in just under three months, I can't afford to spend the money on two $50 tarps. This was part of the advantage to the blue tarps, pretty cheap.
    I'll have to look around for the tyvek or settle for some painter's drop cloth until Christmas rolls around. Then maybe Santa (or mom) can deliver some nice quality tarps.

  3. #13
    commercial constructios sites sometimes have some really nice plastic shee, it has diamond grid reinforcement fibers in it.
    Quote Originally Posted by froldt View Post
    I keep meaning to scout out some construction sites, but haven't taken the time to do so. We were planning on heading out this weekend so I needed them fast, but it looks like we won't be able to. So I'll start seriously looking around for some tyvec. If not, then I never really considered the painter's drop cloth. thanks!

    It looks like the consensus is for a rectangular tarp. I was actually thinking of hanging them both diagonally (so the rectangular tarp would be asymmetric) so that I would need the same amount of gear to hang them. I did think that I would be able to use the grommets in the sides to close a rectangular one around me.

    Well, I guess I'll have to start looking for some construction sites! Thanks for the advice!

  4. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Bethel, Connecticut
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    55
    I have a 9x9 Sportsman's Guide camo tarp and it's kept me snug and dry in my hammock in a couple of drenching rainstorms. When it's not raining, I sometimes set it up with the side corners high so I have a view.

  5. #15
    Senior Member bear bag hanger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Sanford, FL
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    Dream Hammock ThunderBird
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    I prefer the retangular shape to a square tarp. Much better coverage, particularly if you have to set up on the ground (ie - when your at a place where they don't allow you to hang your hammock). Right now I use a hex shaped MacCat tarp which, I feel, also works better than a square tarp.

  6. #16
    Senior Member nickelanddime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Raleigh,NC
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    DIY parallelogram/speer
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    guidegear camo 12'
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    Anybody tried the eno pro tarp? Looks to be a hybrid rectangular/square. On the heavy side though(22 oz?).
    "nickels and dimes, yours and mine, did you cash in on your dreams? You don't dream for me no" Third Eye Blind

  7. #17
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Jan 2007
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    Tupelo, MS
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    I am going to get a tarp that is closer to rectangular, instead of hex. But I'm not sure what is supposed to be the advantage of rectangular over square? I can see what the advantage of either square or rectangular over hex- better coverage on the ends, to the degree that you could probably get by with a shorter ridge line with equal or better coverage on the ends.

    But what is the advantage, exactly, of rectangular over square? Is it a matter of TOO much coverage- more than needed- on the sides, therefore a weight increase that serves no purpose in most cases?

  8. #18
    Senior Member nickelanddime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Raleigh,NC
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    DIY parallelogram/speer
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    But what is the advantage, exactly, of rectangular over square? Is it a matter of TOO much coverage- more than needed- on the sides, therefore a weight increase that serves no purpose in most cases?
    I think in this case "square" is rotated 90 deg, think diamond
    "nickels and dimes, yours and mine, did you cash in on your dreams? You don't dream for me no" Third Eye Blind

  9. #19
    New Member
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    Apr 2008
    Location
    Charleston, SC
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    2
    Quote Originally Posted by nickelanddime View Post
    Anybody tried the eno pro tarp? Looks to be a hybrid rectangular/square. On the heavy side though(22 oz?).
    Thats what I'm lookin at since, if you buy the onelink you save about $30+ and you can go from the dryfly to the profly for $5, but I haven't had much luck finding out anything about it.

  10. #20
    Senior Member stoikurt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Panama City, FL
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    Custom 1.7/1.1 WB Blackbird
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickelanddime View Post
    I think in this case "square" is rotated 90 deg, think diamond
    I think you mean "rotated 45 degrees". If you rotate 90 degrees it's still a square.
    Stoikurt
    "Work to Live...Don't Live to Work!"

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