Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 41

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Hammock
    Grand Trunk Double
    Tarp
    DIY GrayCat
    Insulation
    DIY UQ/0* bag
    Suspension
    Cinchbuckle&hugger
    Posts
    133

    Beginner question: Best tarp for the money?

    I've been browsing around for a few days now and am still reeling from all of the different brands, styles and suspension techniques for tarps. I'm looking for something that is fairly cheap (broke college student), and can take some abuse. I won't be using it very often and simply needs something that works and isn't ridiculously bulky to transport. I'm most likely getting an ENO DN, and suspending with webbing to a whoopie sling. Any suggestions for tarps, ridgeline, etc?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Gainesville, FL
    Hammock
    DIY Gathered End
    Tarp
    DIY Asym
    Insulation
    DIY Modular Quilt
    Suspension
    Whoopies/MSH
    Posts
    4,017
    Images
    14
    This depends upon what you intend on using it for.

    If you're car camping/bike camping/paddle camping, I definitely, no reservations, recommend the huge Hennessy Hex polyurethane-coated hex tarp. It can be found here. It's huge, totally waterproof (unlike silnylon, which can "mist" through if rain is heavy enough), and not extremely heavy or bulky (it is, however, heavier than most of the tarp offerings of that size from the cottage industry guys and gals). At $70, the price is hard to beat as well. My only complaint with it is that it is a little heavy for backpacking.

    For backpacking, I don't really have a recommendation; I'm in the midst of searching for a tarp that meets my criteria. I can say that I used the hex on my Ocala trip and that it worked like a charm. It was a little heavy, but, hey...

    It's the old saying, "Pick two: cheap, light, coverage."

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Hammock
    Grand Trunk Double
    Tarp
    DIY GrayCat
    Insulation
    DIY UQ/0* bag
    Suspension
    Cinchbuckle&hugger
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by FLRider View Post
    This depends upon what you intend on using it for.

    If you're car camping/bike camping/paddle camping, I definitely, no reservations, recommend the huge Hennessy Hex polyurethane-coated hex tarp. It can be found here. It's huge, totally waterproof (unlike silnylon, which can "mist" through if rain is heavy enough), and not extremely heavy or bulky (it is, however, heavier than most of the tarp offerings of that size from the cottage industry guys and gals). At $70, the price is hard to beat as well. My only complaint with it is that it is a little heavy for backpacking.
    Thanks Rider, that one looks like a great option.

    You can get away with some cheap stuff like:
    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___22217

    But I think bang for your buck and great quality:
    the warbonnet big mamajamba
    http://warbonnetoutdoors.com/tarps.php
    or the oes deluxe
    http://www.outdoorequipmentsupplier....ccat_tarps.php
    Now I'm torn between the one FLRider suggested and the Maccat micro. I assume the Maccat being hex shaped provides more coverage?

  4. #4
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Hammock
    Warbonnet ON!
    Tarp
    SuperFly or MacCat
    Insulation
    Yetis & Mambas
    Suspension
    Webbing and rings
    Posts
    13,919
    Images
    136
    Quote Originally Posted by flashbang009 View Post
    Now I'm torn between the one FLRider suggested and the Maccat micro. I assume the Maccat being hex shaped provides more coverage?
    Totally different tarps! Not even close beyond the shape.
    HH Hex: 144" ridgeline (long) and 120" hex (wide)
    OES Micro: 120" ridgeline and 60" hex.

    The coverage on the sides will be halved with the Micro and you will lose 2' of margin on the ridgeline. Talk about apples and oranges.

    That said, the Micro will keep you dry. Won't keep much of anything on the ground dry except what's directly below your hammock, but it will keep you and your hammock dry. This is an excellent tarp for a long distance hiker worried about weight and not spending much time in camp beyond sleeping. Mine stays quite busy during the summer months. For a general use tarp though, it wouldn't be my first choice; probably not even second or third. That HH Hex is a pretty good deal for what it is.
    Trust nobody!

  5. #5
    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Gainesville, FL
    Hammock
    DIY Gathered End
    Tarp
    DIY Asym
    Insulation
    DIY Modular Quilt
    Suspension
    Whoopies/MSH
    Posts
    4,017
    Images
    14
    Edit: Wall of text below, and Cannibal summarized better than I. Still, if you want side-by-side comparisons...

    The advantage of a hex shape is that it provides the same coverage over the ends of your hammock for a weight savings versus a rectangular tarp. With a standard rectangular tarp, you hang it in an A-frame configuration over the hammock most times. This leaves you with a bunch of extra material at the end corners that you don't really need.

    However, if you intend on camping in heavy thunderstorms with wind-blown rain or in very cold conditions, the extra material at the ends can be converted into "doors" to close off the ends of the tarp and provide better insulation and/or coverage from windblown rain.

    The MacCat Micro is ten feet long by five feet wide, according to the specs. The HH is thirteen feet long by ten feet wide (I've measured it in person, and it matches the specs on that). The MacCat is less than a third of the weight of the HH, as well. The weight savings that the MacCat gives is through less coverage and lighter materials.

    Also note that the MacCat includes seam-sealing and stuff sack in total weight. The HH does not. Neither of them includes tie-outs in weight, either.

    On the whole, the HH gives better coverage at a lower price and higher weight. The MacCat gives a much better weight at a higher price and lower coverage.

    According to the ENO site, the DoubleNest is 9'10" long. Note that this is not the hung length; this is the total length of the hammock body. Hung length should be somewhere around eight feet, if my memory is right concerning the average sag for a hammock (I use a structural ridgeline, so I don't have to mess with that on my hangs as much).

    Which means that the MacCat should give a little less than a foot's extra coverage on either end and the HH should give a little less than two and an half feet's coverage on either end.

    Width-wise, the ENO site says that the DN is 6'8" wide. If you use the hammock as a lounger during the rain, you might wind up making it (the hammock) four feet wide.

    With the MacCat, that means that your legs are going to be perilously close to the edge of the tarp, probably getting your feet wet. With the HH, you might get your feet wet, but probably not. However, if you're simply using the hammock to sleep in, either should do just fine as far as coverage from downward rain goes. If it's blowing hard, the extra two and an half feet of coverage per side from the HH will allow for a less claustrophobic feeling under the tarp. However, if the close feeling of the tarp doesn't bother you, then the MacCat is probably a good choice as well.

    Really, it comes down to three things: how much packweight do you want to carry, how much do you want to spend, and how much space do you want under the tarp? Once you can answer those, the choice will become a lot easier.

  6. #6
    Senior Member ShadowAlpha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    NW Georgia
    Hammock
    WBBB SL Lefty /Traveler
    Tarp
    Superfly/HG Cuben
    Insulation
    Yeti,0*Phnx,Burrow
    Suspension
    Stuff from Dutch!
    Posts
    2,280
    Images
    32
    I have a WB superfly. works well for cold weather with its built in doors. can flap open doors for nicer weather.

    there's many avail. all depends on your budget

  7. #7
    New Member Hairball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Lakewood, CO
    Hammock
    GT Double
    Tarp
    None yet
    Insulation
    Ridgerest pad
    Suspension
    Whoopies & Webbing
    Posts
    43
    Quote Originally Posted by ShadowAlpha View Post
    I have a WB superfly. works well for cold weather with its built in doors. can flap open doors for nicer weather.

    there's many avail. all depends on your budget
    **** I really love that Superfly. It seems totally overkill for me current needs and particularly budget, but I've always been a sucker for cool gear. Not sure I can justify that one at this time!

  8. #8
    Needs more Hang time Catavarie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Hammock
    LeanGreen/BigRed/DIY
    Tarp
    CatCut Hex/GG12
    Insulation
    Fur I grow myself
    Suspension
    Of Disbelief
    Posts
    3,519
    Images
    3
    If you're really looking for cheap yet durable you can DIY a Tyvek tarp. Either pick some up from a construction site or the Great Outdoor Provission Company in Chapel Hill sells it by the foot. Unsure if the Raleigh store has it as well, but you could check there first as it would be a much shorter drive for you.
    *Heaven best have trees, because I plan to lounge for eternity.

    Good judgement is the result of experience and experience the result of bad judgement. - Mark Twain

    Trail name: Radar

    2014 Smoked Butt Hang Planning Thread | Sign up Sheet

  9. #9
    Burning at both ends Dblcorona's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Novi, MI
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.7 DBL
    Tarp
    HG Cuben
    Insulation
    Sleeping BearTQ/UQ
    Suspension
    Straps and Slings
    Posts
    1,136
    Images
    18
    You can get away with some cheap stuff like:
    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___22217

    But I think bang for your buck and great quality:
    the warbonnet big mamajamba
    http://warbonnetoutdoors.com/tarps.php
    or the oes deluxe
    http://www.outdoorequipmentsupplier....ccat_tarps.php
    "We don't stop hiking because we grow old,
    we grow old because we stop hiking."

    -- Finis Mitchell,

  10. #10
    Fish<><'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Yigo, Guam
    Hammock
    DL1.1XLC/ BIAS WWM/ DIY
    Tarp
    HG Cuben/ DIY
    Insulation
    N/A
    Suspension
    depends...
    Posts
    1,163
    Quote Originally Posted by Dblcorona View Post
    You can get away with some cheap stuff like:
    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___22217

    But I think bang for your buck and great quality:
    the warbonnet big mamajamba
    http://warbonnetoutdoors.com/tarps.php
    or the oes deluxe
    http://www.outdoorequipmentsupplier....ccat_tarps.php
    I just purchased the exact one from campmor, waiting on it to arrive; not quite in time for my weekend hang tomorrow night... Hopefully it's a decent tarp. If not I sense a diy project in the near future...

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •