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  1. #1
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    best for mesquitos

    I currently own an HH but have yet to use it except to try it in my yard. I fear the HH being made in Canada for Canadians may not be suitable for those that want to camp in the Everglades. For those unfamiliar with the glades, this time of year in the hottest months of the summer the air can be black with mosquitos and the rain can come in sideways. Hammock camping can keep you above the snakes or even a stray gator depending on where you are. I am torn between the Claytor and the Clark. I love the fact the Clark is very weather proof and has the areas on both ends to keep driving rain out but the price seems to be very high compared to the Claytor which also seems like a good hammock although it also seems to lack the Clarks excellent weather proofing as far as sideways weather protection. My opinion thus far is that the Claytor would be a better choice than a HH but the Clark would be the best if not for the money. The Clark has the mosquito protection the HH does not have and the Claytor has a double bottom to help keep you from getting bitten through the fabric. Any past experience with these two hammocks in this area would be welcomed. I like the Clark but not the dollars.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Any of the hammocks you listed will do fine. FWIW, the Hennessys do the best in very buggy areas IMO. The bottom entry allows a very few mosquitoes in when you enter and exit. The side entry hammocks are going to let in many more. Not a problem if you like killing a few bugs before bed, but in really bad areas it's a Hennessy that goes with me.

    I started this hanging thing while living in Florida. Hiked the Everglades section of the FT on one of my first hikes...in June. I'll never do it again, but I will say the Hennessy kept me safe at night. I just wished I could have figured out a way to hike inside my hammock. I always wore a shirt to sleep, so they couldn't get through the "mosquito-proof" (so they say) fabric of the Hennessy and the shirt. Only place I ever got bit while in the hammock was where flesh would press against the netting, like my forehead!
    Trust nobody!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bradley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glades junkie View Post
    I . . . want to camp in the Everglades.
    . . . this time of year in the hottest months of the summer the air can be black with mosquitos and the rain can come in sideways.
    . . . Clark would be the best if not for the money.
    . . . Claytor has a double bottom to help keep you from getting bitten through the fabric. .
    1. you get what you pay for.
    2. the double layer will be a warmer lay, keeping the cooling breeze away.

    My figuring is, if you like it
    if you think it will be the right one for you
    buy it
    if you need to, save for it, you will not regret it.
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    "Call unto me, and I will answer thee, and show you great and mighty things . . ." Jeremiah 33:3
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  4. #4
    Go with one of the Tropical versions of the Clark.

    I am really loving my TX-250.

  5. #5
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannibal View Post
    Any of the hammocks you listed will do fine. FWIW, the Hennessys do the best in very buggy areas IMO. The bottom entry allows a very few mosquitoes in when you enter and exit. The side entry hammocks are going to let in many more. Not a problem if you like killing a few bugs before bed, but in really bad areas it's a Hennessy that goes with me.

    I started this hanging thing while living in Florida. Hiked the Everglades section of the FT on one of my first hikes...in June. I'll never do it again, but I will say the Hennessy kept me safe at night. I just wished I could have figured out a way to hike inside my hammock. I always wore a shirt to sleep, so they couldn't get through the "mosquito-proof" (so they say) fabric of the Hennessy and the shirt. Only place I ever got bit while in the hammock was where flesh would press against the netting, like my forehead!
    Ditto to all of that. Of course, for people who treat with Permethrin, both hammock and clothing, and cover skin with Picaridin or equiv, the bottom entry may not show as big an advantage as other wise.

    And the mossy resistant bottom fabric of the HH will vary with which model, and particularly if it is dbl layer or not.

    Do you like your HH, other than for the issues you have mentioned? Because the HH Super Shelters UC provides a whole bunch of sideways rain protection, even when used with the tiny HH tarp, as well as an extra layer to resist the mossies. Then again, if hiking in hot FL weather, the few extra degrees of warmth the UC alone will add might not be tolerable.

    And of course, with any of these hammocks you have mentioned- or any other- sideways rain is well dealt with by an adequate sized tarp pitched correctly for conditions. Along with a sheltered site selection. But if you are feeling insecure about sideways rain with the HH diamond tarp, but want to stick with it ( just 2 stakes etc) the SS bottom ( UC ) adds a ton of security.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  6. #6
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    The mesh of the bug netting on Clarks is very close. Enough for there to be a temp and humidity difference after a while. Clark claims toughness for the netting too, and from the crossing of netting with grosgrain, it is obvious the engineering of thiss part is experience-driven.

    Ditto the multiple zipper sliders.

    I've commented more than once here that the $40 charge for the zippered weathershield, when it is not already included, has to be a pricing error or a great bargain.

    At 67" and 170lb / 75kg and broad shouldered, I have to say that the smaller bed model (Tropical vs NX-250) is as comfortable as the larger. (I'm in one or the other every night, so the comparison is easy).

    Not mentioned in any Clark threads: If you'd like your kids to keep their rooms and common living space tidy.....well, the big cargo pockets on all Clarks might help you have your camp-site be a bit tidier, too.

    None of the above in any disrespect to other makers' products. Engineering and workmanship from several makers is reported, in years and years of postings I've read, to be as good.

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