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  1. #1
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    Interested in some kind of Pod

    Either Peapod or PolarPod. I have some questions for you who use these.

    I plan on using it in +/- 15*F. I am short 5'5. I like to sleep on a diagonal. Will I be able to do this in a Peapod or should I just get the bigger PolarPod. Also, what is the weight of the PolarPod. There are no weight specs for this model on the TTTG website.

    What else will I need beside a Pod to get this these temperatures?

    Thanks,

    ~S~

  2. #2
    smithobx's Avatar
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    Sidewinder, The PeaPod weighs approximately 48 oz. and is available with an overstuff option for extreme conditions. If you should consider the PolarPod is more a function of build than height. Give Dale a call and discuss it with him to make sure you make the right choice. With the proper top quilt the temps. you mention should pose no problem for either one.--John
    Tree to Tree Trail Gear: Designer of the Switchback hammock, SB Light Hiker hammock, Light Hiker bedroll, Light Hiker diamond tarp http://stores.tttrailgear.com

  3. #3
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    Thanks, emailed Dale with questions, waiting for a reply so I know what to order.

    ~S~

  4. #4
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    My PeaPod weighs 42 oz, it looks like they put more down( 24.5 900fp compared to 19 wow) in the ones TTTG makes. So it is going to be even warmer than mine, even though it is rated at the same temp!

    As for what else you will need to use with it, there are so many variables. A major one is which hammock you use it with. The wider/deeper/more bathtub like the hammock, the more it will lift the "top quilt" part, causing a big gap between you and the insulation, and raising the usable temp top wise. A more narrow hammock will allow the pod to maybe even- in most spots- to drape down right on top of you. Under those conditions, I have been able to easily do low 30s and even be ok in hi 20s, just using the light weight warm clothing I had with me and wore in the daytime anyway. Using those same clothes and a summer sleeping bag on top plus a space blanket in the bottom, I have been warm at 10F.

    Another variable is how much you are willing to close it. Having a 6 or even 3" vent hole makes a huge dif compared to being closed down to just a 1/4" hole or even close all the way. ( I know, we worry about condensation, but I have never really had any, and some others have reported the same). If you have a significant vent near your face, the warm air will rush right out unless you have some insulated clothing you can use to make a "neck collar" to block the warm air from rushing from your chest area and lower body, right out of the vent.

    I have always found the 20F bottom rating to be easily met. But again there are variables controlled by the user and how tight you adjust it. You can play with it a bit when you 1st set it up, and adjust it so that there is anywhere from a big gap under you, or so that it is just barely touching your back, but not tight enough to compress the loft. Again, the adjustment needed will vary with the hammock. Leaving a big gap can be useful when it is not very cold. Or this space can be used to add more insulation, like a down parka or quilts or whatever you have handy, to take this WAY down below the 20 rating. Same on top, adding quilts can make it WAY warmer than 20. But at some point, you run out of room for adding stuff and end up having trouble closing it on top or compressing the insulation if you do close it. A PolarPod will give you much more room for adding other insulation.

    I have always been able to sleep on the diagonal. But I can not always get in some of the extreme diagonal positions which I sometimes use for fetal position without compressing the sides or even popping the Velcro open. But for the most part, I can sleep in my normal hammock positions. Again, all of this will vary with the hammock.

    And again, this pod should be a good bit warmer than mine.
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 09-17-2011 at 08:15.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  5. #5
    R00K's Avatar
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    Wow, some detailed advice BillyBob!

    Also just wanted to add that I found it tricky sleeping in much of a diagonal position while in a pod (wasn't a Speer product).
    Support: HammockGear - Zpacks - Jacks R Better - DreamHammock - Dutchware - AHE - Black Rock - Grand Trunk

  6. #6
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by R00K View Post
    Wow, some detailed advice BillyBob!

    Also just wanted to add that I found it tricky sleeping in much of a diagonal position while in a pod (wasn't a Speer product).
    Thanks I guess- I have the curse of being long winded. Seems I feel I must cover every possible detail every time! So, here is some more!

    Yes, some very few folks have reported the actual PeaPod not being big enough for them or their hammocks. I think one case was a big guy with an ENO double who really liked to get way diagonal. But at 6'1" and 210 lbs, I have not had any problems at all getting in my normal digonal position in my narrow Claytor No Net or my Speer 8.5 model. Which is not to say that there are not some positions I am able to be comfortable in in my hammocks which I can not really use with a closed up PeaPod. As wide as it is, it is just not wide enough for those positions, not if mostly closing the top layer . But normal diagonal or on side or even fetal, no problem whatsoever.

    But, I must say that some of those positions can also cause potential problems with many other UQs I have used. Most of them are not quite wide enough to completely cover every thing in some of the extreme diagonal/fetal combo positions which I find extra comfy in some hammocks. But it is worse with the Pod because I am wanting to close the pod on top.

    Still, despite pros and cons, the PeaPod is one mighty fine and a draft free- assuming you deal with the vent issues- system for keeping warm top and bottom.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  7. #7
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    Thanks BB!

    Appreciate your answers. Do you know anything about the polar pod?

    I think I need one of these pods thingies but not sure which one to get. I know i said 15*f but I'm thinking now that I'd like to go as low as 0*F and not sure if the regular peapod would work. Do you know if tttg will overstuff the peapod as an option?

    Thanks,

    ~S~

  8. #8
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewinder View Post
    Appreciate your answers. Do you know anything about the polar pod?

    I think I need one of these pods thingies but not sure which one to get. I know i said 15*f but I'm thinking now that I'd like to go as low as 0*F and not sure if the regular peapod would work. Do you know if tttg will overstuff the peapod as an option?

    Thanks,

    ~S~
    It looks to me that it is already overstuffed compared to mine, it weighs 6 oz more which nearly all down. Mine was rated at 20F, but remember all pod ratings are primarily for the bottom. Top ratings are subject to so many variables such as I have already mentioned in the original post.

    I'm sure my PeaPod, which has 5 oz less 900fp down than these new ones, will easily go to zero just by adding insulation as needed. For example, a down Parka or summer quilt plus space blanket/vapor barrier in the bottom will def take it way lower than the rated 20 on bottom, as will similar tricks on top. JUST a space blanket in the bottom got me to 10F OK, along with warm clothes and a summer bag on top. Again, the current heavier model should be a good bit warmer.

    I don't know much about the PolarPod, never even seen one. It has an additional 6 oz of down, plus an option for more overstuff is available. It is one foot longer and 1.5 feet wider than a PeaPod, and I see it is rated to 10F instead of 20. But the main advantage I see for deep winter below zero use is that the larger dimensions will make it much easier to add all kinds of insulation at those times when you need it. Lots of room!
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    It looks to me that it is already overstuffed compared to mine, it weighs 6 oz more which nearly all down.
    I got an email from Dale yesterday stating that the Peapod weighs 38ozs and it's the Polarpod that weighs 48ozs. Something about someone making a typo on their site.

    Beside more room, another advantage of the Polarpod is the ability for it to fit their Switchback line of hammocks. Dale mentioned that the extra material was incorporated to ensure complete closure on these hammocks.

    I'm leaning towards a Peapod right now as the quilt to start me off into winter camping. At 10ozs lighter maybe I won't need a pulk!

    ~S~

  10. #10
    Darby's Avatar
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    Smithobx (John) confused the two weights, the PeaPod weighs approx. 38 oz. and the PolarPod comes in at about 48 oz.

    Cheers, Dale
    Beer won't solve problems, but then again, neither will milk !
    Designer of the Switchback Hammock
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