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Thread: Types of Cord

  1. #11
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneThing View Post
    For myself, I plan on using 40 feet of Zing it for my Tarp CRL. (The extra will be used for emergency use) I'm going to use Mason line (Braided) for guide lines. I'm using the Mason line, because I've read it's a little easier to do splicing.
    There won't be a lot of extra, if you start with 40 ft. I know it sounds like a lot, but a CRL (when used with large trees or a long span) will use up quite a bit.

    Mason line is fine, and quite inexpensive. It 'can' be braided also, but not as easily (IMO) as the other options. The drawback is that it isn't that durable over time, and tends to tangle if you aren't very careful with it. Some folks don't mind that, though, and consider the low cost to be the trump factor. HYOH!
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  2. #12

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    FWIW when you are all done most of the new cords are lighter because they are smaller so, except for spliced products like whoopee's, one gets into more hardware instead of knots. Basic 1/8 in polyester sash cord still works well for tarp lines, tieouts, bear ropes, clothes lines, etc and is much easier to work with if you would rather tie knots.

  3. #13
    Senior Member OneThing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by angrysparrow View Post
    There won't be a lot of extra, if you start with 40 ft. I know it sounds like a lot, but a CRL (when used with large trees or a long span) will use up quite a bit.

    Mason line is fine, and quite inexpensive. It 'can' be braided also, but not as easily (IMO) as the other options. The drawback is that it isn't that durable over time, and tends to tangle if you aren't very careful with it. Some folks don't mind that, though, and consider the low cost to be the trump factor. HYOH!
    I purchased some Dutchware & & 25 feet of Zing it. I went to hang my tarp and came up short. Thanks for pointing out 40 feet might not be enough as well. The stuff is light enough, you can add the extra feet & it still doesn't even come up to an oz.

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    Spectra/Dyneema are both trade names for the same product which is a UHMWPE fibre. Very strong very light but temperature sensitive, frictional heating can cause loss of strength. All should float, and all have very low stretch, but may have some "tightening" in the initial loadings. Hollow core rope is easier to work with for splicing and much softer, more able to fold and comform readily to shapes, wraps etc. Double braid, or sheathed rope tends to be stiffer and less nice to handle and can be a challenge to tie. Splices are rarely as strong as the rope.

    Zing-it, Lash-it, Amsteel, Amsteel Blue are all spectra/dyneema hollow core cords. Amsteel(blue) is available in different sizes. The others are specific sized choices designated originally for certain applications. Most of these are Samson Ropes brand names. There are similar choice from other manufacturers.

    Zing-it (yellow) / Lash-It (grey)
    1/16 (1.8mm) strength 500 lb, weight 0.12lb/100'
    3/32 (2.2mm) strength 650 lb, weight 0.16lb/100'

    Amsteel Blue
    7/64 strength 1600lb, weight 0.3lb/100'
    1/8 strength 2500lb, weight 0.5lb/100'

    Another even stronger for the size (but heavier line) is Technora (a trade name similar to Kevlar, for an aramid fibre) that is used in ropes cords. Technora lines won't float, have next to no stretch like Spectra/Dyneema, but aren't likely to melt in frictional heating situations as they are very heat resistant. (Working temperatures of up to 400F If I recall correctly...)

    Tech-12 is Samson ropes hollow core rope in Technora
    1/8" strength 2800lb, Weight 0.6lbs/100'

    Maxim Techcord from New England Ropes comes in 3mm and 5mm This is a polyester sheathed version with a straight fibre core of Technora (Think of it as uber strong paracord). Developed with the US military as emergency rappelling line in the 5mm size. Strength is over 5150lb. for 5mm, 3600lb for 3mm
    1/8 strength 3600lb, weight 0.8lb/100'
    3/16 strength 5150lb, weight 1.7lb/100'

    I just purchased 1/8" Tech-12 and 7/64" Amsteel Blue in yellow from Redden Marine, great folks to deal with and excellent prices.
    Last edited by Rapt; 10-04-2011 at 12:45. Reason: Added some additional content on rope types.
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  5. #15
    Senior Member uncle_ray_ray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneThing View Post
    I purchased some Dutchware & & 25 feet of Zing it. I went to hang my tarp and came up short. Thanks for pointing out 40 feet might not be enough as well. The stuff is light enough, you can add the extra feet & it still doesn't even come up to an oz.
    What distance of cord would you recommend assuming that tree trunks may be relatively large in diameter and spaced apart fairly distant?
    Last edited by uncle_ray_ray; 10-04-2011 at 11:38.

  6. #16
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneThing View Post
    I purchased some Dutchware & & 25 feet of Zing it. I went to hang my tarp and came up short. Thanks for pointing out 40 feet might not be enough as well. The stuff is light enough, you can add the extra feet & it still doesn't even come up to an oz.
    Unless you have strength to burn -- and even if you do -- add the extra feet with splices rather than knots. Not a bad idea, either, for the extra line you carry to already have eye-loops spliced in the ends. Makes for easy daisy-chaining.

  7. #17
    New Member Ryan4756's Avatar
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    Awesome thread for us newbies, thx.... Makes me re-think my purchase of 150' of dynaglide(intended for nearly all purposes) a bit, with amsteel being more versatile it sounds. Then again, no wind or pull force is going to test tie-outs to anywhere remotely close to 1600lbs....which is why i bought some lighter spectra for that purpose and for backpack weight savings. Different application needs, different cord strength requirement.... but as always, it is a personal choice as long as the type of cord safely
    meets and/or exceeds it's purpose, right? It is so fun to fine tune......
    I love it!!
    Last edited by Ryan4756; 10-04-2011 at 15:13. Reason: Meant dynaglide, not dyneema

  8. #18
    Senior Member OneThing's Avatar
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    Thanks to All

    Thanks to all who posted here. It really did clear up many questions in one place.

  9. #19
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    In another thread on HF I can't find, Warbonnetguy, an experienced outdoorsman / camper, rued that along with current hi-tech mity-strong, light, and stretch-free line used for tying down tarps / tents / rain flys comes the complication of building back in the stretch, resilience, and shock absorption that has been there [in nylon] [for a couple of generations.]

    I wonder that a little, if not enough, of those properties in nylon isn't available in less-expensive braided polyester line, the stuff kite fliers use at small cost in added weight.

  10. #20
    Senior Member dimeotane's Avatar
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    strength requirements:

    Hammock suspension aside, using 500# or 100lb line seems like it must be overkill for the tarp ridge line and tie outs. Surely it is much more strength than needed.The cords listed here so far are very strong, and require a special order to obtain with $15 shipping.

    Is the main idea to use a Dyneema line that isn't too stretchy? Any suggestions for line that's easy to find?

    What would be the lower end strength requirements for a tarp ridge line, and tie outs? Is 40lb twisted masons line good enough? Or is it too stretchy for the ridge line?

    I've also found some 2mm line at a local store rated around 100lbs : here but it's likely similar to paracord.

    Shug mentions here that paracord is ok but a bit too absorbent and heavy.
    Weegie says here it's too stretchy.
    Last edited by dimeotane; 10-11-2011 at 15:14.

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