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  1. #11
    mbiraman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbinhood View Post
    Something to think about. You can get the entire 22" Ti stove from Titanium Goat with the more expensive and lighter Ti stove pipe for $325.00. This is for an 8' stove pipe, and includes a nice bag to store it all in. Unless you figure your time as free, the TiGoat stove is a very good deal.

    Building the stove is not hard, but it's also not easy, and it will take you several hours to do it right. One tricky part is cutting the hole in the stove body for the stove pipe because the body is not flat, it's a cylinder, which means when you match the round stove pipe up to it, the hole where they intersect is an oval. The hole must be cut very precise, otherwise smoke will leak out at the junction. If it's too small, forcing the stove pipe into the hole will distort and bend the body of the stove.

    I have not weighed my stove. According to TiGoat's website, the 22" stove with a 7' Ti pipe weighs about 2lbs. You can add about 10oz. to that weight for a stove with a stainless steel pipe.

    This is a specialty item for those people who feel they must have a heated shelter. Obviously, it's a nice guilty pleasure if you are camping in very cold conditions, but for the price of the stove, you can buy a top quality down quilt or under-quilt. Also, the stove will not burn all night. I can get about a 3-4 hour burn time in mine with good hardwood and the stove dampered back. If you want all night heat, you will have to get up at least once to stoke the stove. Also, burning a fire, even in a stove, inside of a tent or under a tarp is not a risk free proposition. More than one person has lit their shelter on fire, which would not be a good thing in the middle of the night, where you might lose all of your gear and be put in a real life or death survival situation.
    I'm glad you brought up the hole in the round stove body as this was what i was curious about ,,,finding a simple way to do this. I love the idea of the light weight stove that you could backpack,,just don't know yet which direction i'm going in.I keep going back to a box stove,snowtrekker, but am still looking around my community for the right metal container to Frankenstein. I personally don't like all night heat and the idea of leaning over in the morning and throwing tinder,kindling in, starting the stove up and leaning back in bed is attractive to me. We'll see.

    bill
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  2. #12
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    How to cut Hole for Stove pipe

    Here is how I cut the hole for my pipe. Roll the cylinder for the stove body and assemble the stove with the two end plates. Position the overlap in the cylinder on the bottom of the stove. Once you have the cylinder with bottom down, mark the top dead-center on the cylinder. Also measure in from the edge the distance of the end plate offset +1/4". This point will be the back outside edge of the hole for the stove pipe. From that point, measure over
    3" forward along the top edge of the cylinder. This point will become the front outside edge of the 3" hole. Find the midpoint between between the two marks, which is the center of your hole. Measure from the center to each side 1.5", which gives you four points 90 degrees apart on the edge of a round 3" circle.

    Disassemble the stove and lay out the cylinder flat. Drill a large hole in the center of the 3" circle you have marked and use a scissors or curved aviation shears to cut out the circle. A sharp scissors will cut both the stainless and the Ti shimstock. You can also use a razor knife, but be careful because it will slip very easily on the metal. I used the razor knife. You could also use a 3" hole saw in a drill press, but be very careful because if it grabs as it goes through, you will have a spinning piece of shim stock with a razor edge that will cut anything in its path.

    Reassemble the stove and hold the end of the damper or 3" stove pipe up to the hole you have made. It should fit front to back, down the top ridge of the cylinder, but not side to side where the cylinder curves away. Mark the excess material on the sides with a Sharpie. I then used a Dremel tool with a cylindrical stone to remove the excess material by grinding it away a little at a time. Remove a bit, and the refit the pipe to the hole. Note any place where it won't fit, and keep removing a bit of material at a time with the Dremel until the damper or the pipe fit perfectly in the hole. When you flatten out the cylinder again, you will now have a perfectly shaped oval hole.

  3. #13
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    I have seen Tinny's stove made from the Heinnie keg. The keg is steel, not aluminum, which will melt at temperatures created in a wood fire. The problem with the keg is it is not collapsible, and it weighs more. If you are car camping, the Heinnie keg could make a very functional, cheap stove, plus you get to drink the beer. I have a Heinnie keg that I am going to experiment with some day.

    Quote Originally Posted by AaronAlso View Post
    Tinny over at MBD experimented with something like this based on a mini-beer-keg for the stove body. Those things are pretty sturdy Aluminium, but I guess burnout could be a problem over time.

    Have you considered using one of them?

  4. #14
    in it for the naps oldgringo's Avatar
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    There's a bunch of this stuff on youtube...ammo cans and freon bottles seem pretty popular.
    Dave

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  5. #15
    Senior Member Hike2Hang's Avatar
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    planning to make something similar using a small ammo can.
    my idea is to make it as a wood stove for winter use, but also have a grate in top so I can remove the lid and cook over a contained fire in the summer, rather than having a fire pit if conditions are too dry or otherwise dangerous.

    I'm still trying to decide what to use as my stove pipe.
    I like the idea of making one by rolling steel stock.
    I can get it by the custom length at my local hardware store sold for roof flashing, not the heaviest weight, but one could, in theory, make 1 small diameter pipe, wrap it in insulation, then insert that combination into a larger outer shell, thus making a custom insulated stove pipe.
    I'm not sure that just rivets would be suffice (please let me know) to secure the tubes, but surely some stove cement, or other high heat sealer in combination with the rivets would surely work well.
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  6. #16
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    Stove Pipe

    Youtube has videos of ammo can stoves. Heavy, but ok for car camping.

    As for stove pipe, make sure you don't buy aluminum flashing by mistake. Aluminum will melt at wood fire temperatures and may fail at the worst time.

    Most steel flashing is galvanized. Galvanized flashing will give off toxic smoke and gas the first few times it is burnt. It then may rust. Not sure how thick it is, but it may be hard to bend into a tube. You can use 3" gas waterheater vent and accomplish the same thing, but you won't be able to roll it up lengthwise to transport.

    You don't need rivets. Make hoops the diameter of your pipe out of stainless leader wire and slip them over the pipe once it is rolled. This makes the pipe portable, which will not be the case if you rivet it.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbinhood View Post
    Something to think about. You can get the entire 22" Ti stove from Titanium Goat with the more expensive and lighter Ti stove pipe for $325.00. This is for an 8' stove pipe, and includes a nice bag to store it all in. Unless you figure your time as free, the TiGoat stove is a very good deal.
    >snip<

    This is a specialty item for those people who feel they must have a heated shelter. Obviously, it's a nice guilty pleasure if you are camping in very cold conditions, but for the price of the stove, you can buy a top quality down quilt or under-quilt. Also, the stove will not burn all night. I can get about a 3-4 hour burn time in mine with good hardwood and the stove dampered back. If you want all night heat, you will have to get up at least once to stoke the stove. Also, burning a fire, even in a stove, inside of a tent or under a tarp is not a risk free proposition. More than one person has lit their shelter on fire, which would not be a good thing in the middle of the night, where you might lose all of your gear and be put in a real life or death survival situation.

    It's not about keeping warm all night. It's how to deal with the time between off trail and bed time or out of bed and hit the trail. Most places that have snow also have short periods of daylight and long periods of dark. Having a stove and reasonable shelter lets one establish a warmer micro climate to deal with life in. The other options are to stay bundled up or spend a *lot* of time in bed.

  8. #18
    but enough about me hppyfngy's Avatar
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    Stainless steel or titanuium for the stove pipe. SS flashing can be bought in .004 12"x whatever length you want. That's what I've used.

    TiGoat sells it by the foot if you can't find it elsewhere. And the rings if you don't want to make 'em.
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  9. #19
    Senior Member Hike2Hang's Avatar
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    I saw a portable stove today at an outdoors shop. It was about the size of a small ammo can, but it was cast iron. the chimney looked like a car exhaust pipe. I asked how much it was... the stove was $250 and the chimney was another $100! that's insane! Do people actually pay that kind of money for something like that? that'd be so heavy too!
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    Thanks for all your help, advice and more!

  10. #20
    but enough about me hppyfngy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hike2Hang View Post
    I saw a portable stove today at an outdoors shop. It was about the size of a small ammo can, but it was cast iron. the chimney looked like a car exhaust pipe. I asked how much it was... the stove was $250 and the chimney was another $100! that's insane! Do people actually pay that kind of money for something like that? that'd be so heavy too!
    Beats me. Backpackers don't though. Cast has it's advantages in a fixed situation for sure, but I think I only paid $250 for my Kifaru stove, pipe and all.

    3# or 50#. You decide...
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