Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Senior Member HappyHiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Lakewood,CO
    Hammock
    DIY DL/HH Hyperlite/WBBB 1.1 DL
    Tarp
    WL Old Man Winter
    Insulation
    HHSS/DIY Down UQ
    Suspension
    Whoopies/Webbing
    Posts
    279
    Images
    22

    DIYGearSupply DL Hammock

    Today I present the DIYGearSupply DL Hammock: http://www.diygearsupply.com/diy_gui...%20Hammock.jpg - one of the fine guides at http://www.diygearsupply.com/diy.html . If you haven't seen these, you should check them out! I found them very useful . Also see: http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...ad.php?t=15205

    Special thanks to sclittlefield, Knotty and Opie for such fantastic guides!

    This was an amazingly easy project, took about 4 hours total for me to complete (hammock only, the whoopie slings and soft shackles took another 2 hours).

    The hardest part of the project was figuring out how I wanted to finish the edges of the fabric. Easiest way would have been to stitch the inner and outer layers where they are connected on the long sides, turn them inside out, fold and stitch the edges of the open section (single fold) and then stitch the end channels. I decided that I didn't want any raw edges exposed, so I took a little more intensive approach (but not by much).

    Here's a little how to:

    1. Cut the fabric to desired length (in this case 10.5"). I cut 2 individual pieces so I could roll hem both the inner and the outer layer separately.

    2. Roll hem the long side of each piece, making sure to orient the hems however you want them. I marked the sides of the fabric inside and outside, and oriented my hems so they would face the outside of the double layer. I don't think it really makes a difference, just more of an aesthetic choice IMO. My side hems were ~1/2", and done by hand.

    3. Line up your hemmed inner and outer layers (I used clothes pins to hold them together), and then attach them together along one long side for 78". Do the same for the opposite side, from the other end. Then add a few reinforcement stitches/backstitches perpendicular to the edge where the inner and outer layers will separate.

    4. Roll hem the ends about 1" , to create the end channel.

    5.Run a drawcord through the channel (I used Mason Line), cinch the ends, wrap 2x and tie off.

    6. Select your ridgeline material and length. The guide gives 101" as a common length. After a bit of experimenting, I found 99" to be the sweet spot for me. I used paracord because it was what I immediately had available, but will ultimately replace it with something stronger later.

    7. Attach your suspension of choice after passing through each end of your ridgeline. I used DIY whoopie slings (DIY Gear Supply has a guide for these too, and some great threads here on HF to point you in the right direction if you want to make these as well) and larks headed them to each end after passing them through the ends of the ridgeline.

    Finished! Wohoo!


    A closeup of the DL separation

    Another view of the DL on one side (and a ridgeline organizer I whipped up)

    My DIY stuffsack with a side pocket for the suspension (soft shackles, tree straps and toggles - all DIY of course )


    1.1 Ripstop (stuffsack fabric I already had), Amsteel and noseeum purchased from: http://www.diygearsupply.com/

    Hammock weight including 8' whoopies: 18.25 oz (19 oz including stuffsack)

    All up including 8' tree straps, toggles, and soft shackles: 25.75 oz (1 lb 9.75 oz)

    A really fun project! As always, thanks to all who post information on DIY making it possible for the inexperienced (me) to produce great gear. Hopefully someone will find something in this post as useful as I have found others information here on HF.

    Happy Hammocking!
    Last edited by HappyHiker; 10-25-2011 at 17:51. Reason: Upsized pics!

  2. #2
    sclittlefield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Northern woods of Maine
    Hammock
    It's a Secret.
    Tarp
    BWDD Winter Dream
    Insulation
    Crowsnest
    Suspension
    Slings
    Posts
    1,435
    Images
    95
    Your project turned out great HappyHiker! Nicely done. I love seeing projects come together.

    Oh, and Paracord is plenty strong for a ridgeline. No need to replace that unless you simply want to.
    DIY Gear Supply - Your source for DIY outdoor gear.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •