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  1. #21
    gargoyle's Avatar
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    May 2009
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    whoop dutch!
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    I've had the best success with lash-it as opposed to zing it for a ridgeline. I also prefer the rl to pass under the tarp (you've seen my rig). Just seems to perform better for me. And no, it has never got me wet. Between the prussik and the carabiner, there seems to be enough of a waterbreak/dripline effect.
    Also remember that lash it and zing it are hydrophobic (don't absorb water and actually float), so water transfer is not as big an issue as it once was with the older style lines.

    Especially with large tarps, like your Hinterland condo-deluxe, I'd suggests a stouter rl. All those guy-out points are pulling the tarp/rl at around (hypothetically) 20-30 lbs each. Times that by four, six, or eight tie outs and the forces are getting large. Add some wind force into the equation....well somethings gotta give. Spreading those forces equally across the entire tarp fabric ridgeline (with an under the tarp rl) and not on only the two rl tieouts works best for me.

    Try adding another wrap to your prussik, it did wonders for me. I now do four wraps and it holds great. (not sure what you had in the video)

    Don't always look at the rl as the problem either. In perfect soil, the stakes hold true all night. But once the rain starts, the soil conditions change, and the stakes can shift a few degrees. That can effect the tarp tautness as well.

    Its a balancing act to get the tarp right, but not so tight and firm that it rips. Id rather have the tarp sag and move, or have a stake come loose under extreme conditions, than have it fail/rip. I think of it as a failsafe.

  2. #22
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter_pan View Post
    Ridgelines are best non self tensioning... If slackenebut tensioned they can pull off center.... best that they be taut and all adjusting lines bee done by the down lines...They are more than up to the task of maintaining tension.

    Pan
    Hmmm. Guess I respectfully question this statement and the use of the word "best". As an apprentice to the master, I ask, "why"? Having tensioners at the ends of your tarp maintain end to end tension, while the down lines maintain side to side tension. I have tried configuring my tarps with ridge line tensioners, with down line tensioners and with both and all have worked. I agree that having slack in the ridge line makes it easier to pull the ridge line off center, but a little attention prevents doing so. Is there another reason why avoidance of tensioners on the RL is best?

  3. #23
    Bubba's Avatar
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    May 2010
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    I've been setting up without a continuous ridgeline over the past little while and find when the side tie outs are tensioned well, the ridgeline never gets loose. Any readjustments I do on the sides serves to tighten the ridgeline tie outs.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

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