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  1. #1
    Senior Member NCPatrick's Avatar
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    My Mount Rogers cold setup: Anything missing?

    Here is my setup for the upcoming Mt. Rogers trip. Can you see if there's any glaring omissions?

    I don't know how low I can go with this setup. I haven't had an opportunity to test it all together yet.

    -HH Explorer Deluxe
    -Hex fly substitute for stock HH tarp
    -4 JRB self tensioning tie-outs (when they arrive, ahem )
    -Kickass Potomac underquilt -thanks to Patrick!
    -Fanatic Fringe 30 degree quilt; 3D Polarguard, not Delta (when it arrives, ahem)
    -6 titanium Y stakes. Most likely will just use 4 for the tarp.
    -1 cheap blue pad from Target, cut in half, corners cut off, used in T formation behind shoulders and down back.

    I have a 9x9 Neo tarp, but for the coldest windy weather, I was going to use the hex tarp and hang it very low (maybe even stake it to the ground on one side.)

    Lowest I've been so far (without the CC pad or the FF30F quilt, and with the Neo tarp) was 34F with a 40F sleeping bag used as a quilt (and granted, there was no wind).

    Clothing -- still being worked out.
    Usually sleep in a toque (stocking hat? What do YOU call it?).
    Columbia Fleece vest with neck zipped all the way up,
    Running pants (Sport Hill).
    2-3 layers of Shirt(s) of some kind, usually 1 long sleeve and 1 short sleeve, maybe 1 tanktop over them all
    Socks.
    Mittens (more like very light hand covers, used for running)


    See anything obvious right off the bat?

  2. #2
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    balaclava is often usefull in the cold, perhaps more than one hat depending on the characteristics of the toque

    30 deg. quilt seems a bit light but it all depends on the weather forcast

  3. #3
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    also a small CCF pad for under the feet is often useful

  4. #4
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    Might want something warmer for your topside. Another layer of clothing, a fleece blanket for under the quilt, etc. With the unseasonably warm temps we seem to be having, the quilt might be enough...but with the average temp of 23F I'd want to have more than 30F of insulation above me.

    Bottomside insulation looks good.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

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  5. #5
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    What temp do you think you can get down to with this setup? Was that 34 deg with the kickass quilt?

  6. #6
    Senior Member NCPatrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cargousa View Post
    What temp do you think you can get down to with this setup? Was that 34 deg with the kickass quilt?
    Yes, that was with the Kickass quilt. That was the coldest I've gotten to, but then it stopped being cold recently.

    HOI, I think a balaclava would freak me out. I ordered an extra 6 inches on the length of the FF quilt, in the hopes that I could just pull it up over my head if my face got cold.

    Jeff, a fleece blanket under the quilt sounds pretty good. I've actually got a cheap fleece sleeping bag (again from Target) so that might be a possibility too unzipped, leaving a footbox.

  7. #7
    Senior Member blackbishop351's Avatar
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    I got a cheap fleece sleeping bag too, with the same intention. Problem is, it's not that warm for the weight and bulk. I cut it up to make some stuff (see this morning's thread)
    "Physics is the only true science. All else is stamp collecting." - J. J. Thompson

  8. #8
    Senior Member NCPatrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackbishop351 View Post
    I got a cheap fleece sleeping bag too, with the same intention. Problem is, it's not that warm for the weight and bulk. I cut it up to make some stuff (see this morning's thread)
    Yes, but I already have one. The cost savings there alone are outstanding.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    Breathing into your bag is a no-no. It might be ok for an overnighter or two if it doesn't get that cold, but you can exhale a lot of water and wet insulation sucks. Try a separate facemask with your warm hat...I just got this one and it's a lot more comfortable than a balaclava, and much more versatile. Haven't tried it in the field yet, but my plan for head insulation is a warm fleece hat, the facemask, and a neck gaiter if needed. I also bring a fleece earband...I can't hike in hats but sometimes I wear the earband, and it doubles as a sleep mask if I want to sleep in.

    Here's one with a fleece scarf attached, but it's way too warm for me. I wanted something a bit more versatile b/c I don't do much hiking in really cold weather.

    Careful with the zipper in the hammock...if you zip it up as a footbox, the slider will be just under your knees where you can poke it into the hammock if you roll over on it. And I agree with bb - fleece is pretty heavy and bulky for the insulation, but if you already have it and don't want to buy a cold weather bag yet, it'll work fine for this trip.

    And you can always boil some hot water if it gets colder.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

    - My site: http://www.tothewoods.net/
    - Designer, Jeff's Gear Hammock / Pack Cover by JRB

    IMPOSSIBLE JUST TAKES LONGER

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Jeff View Post
    And you can always boil some hot water if it gets colder.
    Good point - be sure to bring a nalgene for a hot water bottle if it looks like there is a need for last resort warmth - boiling water into nalgene, nalgene into sock and held against femoral artery will often work very well for keeping warm in a marginal situation

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