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  1. #1
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    Unhappy DIY#4 Bridge, a bit of disappointment

    Trying to push the weight down from the 18oz of DIY#3.

    Single layer 1.6oz/sqyd PacificTech polyester taffeta, Endura-12 suspension throughout, including arcs, and slightly smaller dimensions.

    Some good. Some bad.
    Luckily I didn't cut my remaining CF tube for the spreaders and mocked this up with 0.625" aluminum spreaders.

    Weights:
    Tree huggers + Elephant Trunks: 3.6oz
    Hammock + suspension: 5.7oz
    Spreaders 9.7oz (but if I had used my CF tubes, estimated 3.7oz similar to DIY#3)

    Total weight as is: 19oz
    If used with CF spreaders: ~13oz

    Dimensions:
    Length: 84"
    Head width: 46"
    Head Spreader: 40"
    Head ratio: 1.15
    Arc depth: 6"
    Foot width: 36"
    Foot Spreader: 27"
    Foot ratio: 1.33

    From foot end:


    From head end:


    From left side (head to the right of pict):



    Pros:
    1) Endura-12 worked just as well as Dynaglide. Bounced a bit and no problems for my weight (~190#). Seemed easier to splice (to me) than Dynaglide, presumably due to softer feel and different coating.
    2) A single layer of 1.6oz/yd polyester seems to hold my weight fine.
    3) Using Endura-12 for the side arcs worked reasonably fine. Left 1" extra fabric on each side. Folded and hemmed to make a channel. Measured Endura-12 (a bit tricky given the curve and loss of length with splicing), spliced fixed eyes on both ends and threaded through channel. Then double rolled the channel/cord and double sewed through the cord. Overall probably saved ~2oz compared to 3/8" webbing.

    Cons:
    1) Too narrow! I wouldn't have thought changing the head end from 48" to 46" would make that much difference, especially as I kept the head ratio the same at 1.15, but there was definitely a slight confining feeling at the shoulders. This was mitigated by the use of the pad, but...
    2) With the smaller head and foot dimensions, the waist turned out to be only 27.75". A bit narrower than I think is comfortable. Maybe in addition to going back to the widths of DIY#3, I'll also try a 5" arc depth.
    3) The length of 84" was fine, but I think I like the extra 2" that I had on DIY#3. Purely subjective.
    4) I miss the pad pocket. The single layer would be fine if one was to use an UQ, but with the pad there was just a little slipping around. Maybe a few pad retention strips rather than a full pad pocket. Hmmm...

    Well, back to the drawing board.
    Last edited by BER; 11-03-2011 at 14:29.

  2. #2
    Senior Member dblhmmck's Avatar
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    Great work, Ber!

    Hi Ber,

    I applaud the development that you are doing with your bridge hammocks! I have done some similar work, but my documentation has been poor.

    Your head end fabric width is narrower than I have gone by two inches, 48"-50" has worked best for me. Your pole width is wider. Because of this stretching of the lateral dimensions, you may have to stretch similarly along the length to get the comfort in the shoulders and a flatter lay for side sleeping. I'd suggest rigging it up tighter with your tree-huggers. We all know that this puts more stress on the hammock and the trees. The materials should handle it easily, just make sure that your tree choice takes this in to account when you choose a more tightly strung hang.

    If you do use strips of material to hold the pad, rather than a full pad sleeve, keep in mind the curvature. If these strips are on the outside, the pad will bulge out away from the hammock and create cold spots. If those strips are on the inside, they may become floppy when you add your weight to the hammock. Holding each corner with a diagonal strap seems like an effective way of doing it. (I'll be testing this method with my fatpad bridge in the near future). Personally, I am starting to think that the pad sleeve is indeed worth it's weight. I'd look at cutting the weight of those elephant trunks, unless the convenience merits keeping them.

    As for the fabric width at the waist, I have some that narrow that I find very comfortable and adequate. However, I sometimes tie the foot of my quilt to my foot end suspension triangle to keep it from falling out of the hammock. The bugnet that I did on my fatpad bridge was done partly to address the issue of the quilt falling out of the narrow waist of the hammock.

    Best wishes with your worthy goals.
    "Better living through Hammockry"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by dblhmmck View Post
    Hi Ber,

    I applaud the development that you are doing with your bridge hammocks! I have done some similar work, but my documentation has been poor.
    Thanks for your comments Victor. These are nowhere near the technical monuments of yours (especially your doubles!) or Grizz's. But a simple bridge, comfortable by my standards, weighing less than 1 pound... has become my mountain...or albatross. Not sure which. Just can't seem to let it go.

    Quote Originally Posted by dblhmmck View Post
    Your head end fabric width is narrower than I have gone by two inches, 48"-50" has worked best for me. Your pole width is wider. Because of this stretching of the lateral dimensions, you may have to stretch similarly along the length to get the comfort in the shoulders and a flatter lay for side sleeping. I'd suggest rigging it up tighter with your tree-huggers. We all know that this puts more stress on the hammock and the trees. The materials should handle it easily, just make sure that your tree choice takes this in to account when you choose a more tightly strung hang.
    The ratio of fabric width to spreader bar length of 1.15 has been working well for me for the last couple bridges. But in this one, the loss of two inches, even though I kept the same ratio, really seems to make a difference. I will try stringing it tighter and see if that helps. I have always used my chin as the measure for tree strap height as I tend to hang low--especially with these experiments. I'll go lower, but not higher.

    Quote Originally Posted by dblhmmck View Post
    If you do use strips of material to hold the pad, rather than a full pad sleeve, keep in mind the curvature. If these strips are on the outside, the pad will bulge out away from the hammock and create cold spots. If those strips are on the inside, they may become floppy when you add your weight to the hammock. Holding each corner with a diagonal strap seems like an effective way of doing it. (I'll be testing this method with my fatpad bridge in the near future). Personally, I am starting to think that the pad sleeve is indeed worth it's weight. I'd look at cutting the weight of those elephant trunks, unless the convenience merits keeping them.
    I think you are right about the strips. I envisioned them on the inside. My pad pocket on the last two were 24" wide (the pad I use is 20" wide and 3.5" thick when fully inflated) and were pretty loose with the pad only partially inflated. I could probably go 22" wide. Just adding a pad pocket of 1.1oz/yd ripstop to the single layer would only add 1.65 oz (23"x84"= ~1.5yd). This might be less hassle than strips. Nothing to catch your toes on when sliding under the quilt.

    The elephant trunk is brilliant and exceptionally convenient both for hanging the hammock and for rigging the tarp to. A pair only weighs 1.1oz. Might have to look at Dutch Buckles and see if that would save enough weight to justify the cost. (EDIT: Dutch Buckles are 8g, so two of them would save only ~0.5oz over a pair of Elephant Trunks) The tree straps on DIY#3 were 5', those on this bridge were 4'. I could probably save substantial weight by cutting the webbing back to 3' and carrying a continuous loop to use as an extender if needed. That and changing the arc webbing to Endura-12 would probably let me hit 16oz all in if I kept the rest of the construction the same as DIY#3.

    Quote Originally Posted by dblhmmck View Post
    As for the fabric width at the waist, I have some that narrow that I find very comfortable and adequate. However, I sometimes tie the foot of my quilt to my foot end suspension triangle to keep it from falling out of the hammock. The bugnet that I did on my fatpad bridge was done partly to address the issue of the quilt falling out of the narrow waist of the hammock.
    The waist as is, is adequate laying on my back. Not so much on my side. On DIY#3 it measures ~32" (finished), and this seems better to me.

    Maybe DIY#5 will be the ticket.
    Brian
    Last edited by BER; 11-03-2011 at 14:45.

  4. #4
    Member MadRacDad's Avatar
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    BER, I for one am following your threads with much intrest. The R and D is most appreciated. A couple questions. I think we are about the same size (if I may ask) how tall are you? Also, where did you get the Tafeta and Endura for this version. I am still planning my first bridge so, before I start ordering I'd like to explore all options. Thanks again.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member JerryW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dblhmmck View Post
    I'd suggest rigging it up tighter with your tree-huggers. We all know that this puts more stress on the hammock and the trees. The materials should handle it easily, just make sure that your tree choice takes this in to account when you choose a more tightly strung hang.
    I have to echo this. I seem to get the most comfortable lay when I hang my bridge much tighter than the usual 30* angle - more like 15-20*. It seems really tight, but it makes the bed flatter and seems to hold it open wider in the middle.

    Keep on experimenting and listing your measurements. Good stuff!


    Jerry
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadRacDad View Post
    BER, I for one am following your threads with much intrest. The R and D is most appreciated. A couple questions. I think we are about the same size (if I may ask) how tall are you? Also, where did you get the Tafeta and Endura for this version. I am still planning my first bridge so, before I start ordering I'd like to explore all options. Thanks again.
    MRD--
    The Endura-12 came from onlinerope.com. I don't recommend buying from them as I got hosed on the price for a full spool. Look at post #3 on this thread for a source with better per foot pricing.

    The fabric is PacificTech polyester taffeta PT1005 that I bought through RCT fabrics. It appears they are currently out of this fabric.
    Hate

    Quote Originally Posted by JerryW View Post
    I have to echo this. I seem to get the most comfortable lay when I hang my bridge much tighter than the usual 30* angle - more like 15-20*. It seems really tight, but it makes the bed flatter and seems to hold it open wider in the middle.

    Keep on experimenting and listing your measurements. Good stuff!


    Jerry
    Thanks Jerry. I will try to hang it tighter this week and see what it's like. I appreciate your comments. I have admired your DIY work and look forward to seeing your next project. (Hint hint)

  7. #7
    Jazilla's Avatar
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    You said you missed the pad pocket on #4. Why not make a pad sleeve with timeout on the four corners. Insert pad in sleeve then tie out to four corners and no pad movement. Thn you could leave both at home when not needed and save the weight for peanut butter and a chocolate bar.
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  8. #8
    Jazilla's Avatar
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    I used a 4" curve on BridgeZilla #1. I got in it a few time before I put the bug net on. I always get a sence of falling when I set down in it. My spread ratio is much higher then yours, around 1.43 I think. But just me picturing it in my head I see a banana shape. Here is my reasoning. With a shallower curve if gives you more material in the middle (duh Jason) which causes your side suspension to be farther away from your body. I think when you lay in the hammock it will of course pull the sides closer too you causing the center of the hammock to be lower than the head and foot end that is pulled tight with a 1.15 spreader ratio. Oh big run on. Sort of like tighter the head and foot and wider the center less the flat lay.
    Unless you pulled it tight like dbl said previous. Not sure how much it would help but it might.
    Sorry for the rambling but it's Sunday morning and my son kicked me out my bed.
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  9. #9
    DivaB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazilla View Post
    You said you missed the pad pocket on #4. Why not make a pad sleeve with timeout on the four corners. Insert pad in sleeve then tie out to four corners and no pad movement. Thn you could leave both at home when not needed and save the weight for peanut butter and a chocolate bar.
    Curious here, would a separate pad sleeve and just doing tie outs on the 4 corners really work? Have you done this?

  10. #10
    Jazilla's Avatar
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    I have not but I think it would be lighter than another layer of material to make a pad pocket.
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