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  1. #1
    awilder's Avatar
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    How do you keep your underquilt snug against the hammock?

    Does it matter if you draw the ENDS tighter, using the shockcord vs. attaching shock cord to the SIDES and running over the ridgline....or should you do both.

    With the full length incubator (rated for 20 degrees) I found my back was chilly at 33 degrees. Cool enough to keep waking me up. The ends of the underquilt are snug against the hammock and I have a shockcord connected to two loops on each side of the quilt and running over the ridgeline, which should be keeping it snug against the hammock.

    I was wearing smartwool thermals, shorts, a long sleeve tee, wool socks, and a fleece hat.

    My top sleeping bag was more than adequate but my back stayed cool.

    I don't think there's any reason the 20 degree full length incubator shouldn't keep me comfortable down to freezing, and below.

    Suggestions...?

  2. #2
    Needs more Hang time Catavarie's Avatar
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    Are you pulling the shockcord over the ridgeline or to the ends of the hammock? I would think that if your just pulling them over the ridgeline that your UQ could be "folding" in the middle causing an airpocket and therefore a cold spot no matter how tight you pull the end channels. Also pulling the end channels too tight could cause the same problem along the length of the UQ instead of across it.

    I'd recommend loosening everything and start over with the suspension first to get the body of the UQ to fit snug, but not tight enough to compress the down. Then snug up the ends to prevent drafts.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member Roadtorque's Avatar
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    I dont own that brand of quilt so others might say otherwise but I would think about 30 degrees for an average sleeper (not a hot or cold sleeper) would be about right for a 20 degree rated product. I feel like the rating is not what an average person would be warm down to but what an average person should be able to tolerate during an unexpected low temp. In other words I wouldn't buy a 0 degree uq planning on being warm to 0 degrees but probably around 15 degrees.

    Keep playing with your quilt to see if adjustments can be made. Having someone help you will make a lot of difference. Lay in the hammock as someone adjust various parts of the suspension.
    "The only rule to survivialin is NEVER GIVE UP"
    Swinginranger

  4. #4
    DivaB's Avatar
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    Duct Tape Takes care of all the air gaps too!
    ....I don't know what it'll add to the weight though?

  5. #5
    ^shane^'s Avatar
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    Pull the quilt suspension TIGHT. It should be pulling the hammock UP when you aren't in it. I've also used a bit of shock cord to run from the extra loops on the Incubator ends up to the hammock end to ensure the quilt body does not slide and bunch in the middle causing a gap between the hammock and quilt.

    Once I did that, no more CBS (whether you call it cold-back-syndrome or I call it cold-butt-syndrome).
    "One of the best things you can do in this world is take a nap in the woods." ~ Jayber Crow by Wendell Berry

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    Enjoy the day
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  6. #6
    awilder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ^shane^ View Post
    Pull the quilt suspension TIGHT. It should be pulling the hammock UP when you aren't in it. I've also used a bit of shock cord to run from the extra loops on the Incubator ends up to the hammock end to ensure the quilt body does not slide and bunch in the middle causing a gap between the hammock and quilt.

    Once I did that, no more CBS (whether you call it cold-back-syndrome or I call it cold-butt-syndrome).

    That makes sense.

    I also agree about the ratings being relative, but, first, I want to make sure I'm using the underquilt correctly.

  7. #7
    awilder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catavarie View Post
    Are you pulling the shockcord over the ridgeline or to the ends of the hammock? I would think that if your just pulling them over the ridgeline that your UQ could be "folding" in the middle causing an airpocket and therefore a cold spot no matter how tight you pull the end channels. Also pulling the end channels too tight could cause the same problem along the length of the UQ instead of across it.
    I'm mainly referring to the extra loops that are on the side of the underquilts to allow for a custom fit. I thought I'd read that you could run shock cord through these loops and over the ridge line to pull the sides of the quilt up.

    I'm wondering if many people do this, and if it's necessary.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Roadtorque's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by awilder View Post
    I'm mainly referring to the extra loops that are on the side of the underquilts to allow for a custom fit. I thought I'd read that you could run shock cord through these loops and over the ridge line to pull the sides of the quilt up.

    I'm wondering if many people do this, and if it's necessary.
    I do this with some of my winter quilts. With all the weight of the down below me I feel like the shock cord has a hard time holding it up. So I will use some of the "extra loops" for the HH hammocks and tie shock cord to it and run it over the ridge line to help keep it snug.
    "The only rule to survivialin is NEVER GIVE UP"
    Swinginranger

  9. #9
    Senior Member StumpJumper's Avatar
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    I'm still waiting for 2QZQ (or someone else with epic skills) to design the Velcro Hang Mod where you attach UQ's along horizontal velcro strips so it snugs up tightly, shifts with your body, and you don't feel like a shock-cord taco. I always found it odd that shock-cord was best method people could come up with.

  10. #10
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    Where a 20F HG Incubator here had no gap, there was no problem whatever at 23F several nights ago.

    Find the thread and work by HF member scum and brief note by HF member Knottie on what he and others together observed: It is much easier to immediately see that an UQ is snug up against the hammock bottom, without gaps, and to adjust it, with someone else in the hammock. That's an understatement.

    I suspect you are leaking air seriously. Look at every photo inside a gathered end hammock taken by the occupant shooting toward his feet. Lots of furrows. Most everybody assumes those furrows are closed and do not channel cold air.

    Block the flow of air, as a kluge, by covering the end of the hammock or by stuffings something in the taper, especially at the lightly loaded and likely much furrowed foot end. When you are in the hammock reach ove and down. Is there a gap between hammock bottom and UQ top? Also, you could take advantage of the short loops HG provides to pull the UQ up and over the gunwale of the hammock with a shock cord. Or, use multiple clothespins to fasten the sides of the hammock to the UQ.

    All that is just to test that the problem is cold air running between the UQ top and the hammock bottom. Once you prove that to be the cause, you will likely want to figure how to rig the suspension to achieve the same seal.

    Adam from HG commented on performance of shock cord of different diameters. He now favors heavier cord in UQs. It is possible you have lighter cord, which does not provide the tension of heavier stuff.

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