Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 51 to 55 of 55
  1. #51
    Senior Member TiredFeet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    MD
    Hammock
    TeeDee Bridge Hammock
    Tarp
    Customized JRB
    Insulation
    Down or IX
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    1,100
    Images
    34
    Curious - how do you lanolize a wool blanket?

    I have some pure lanolin and as a paste it is very thick and very, very sticky. I know lanolin can be obtained in the form of oil, but at the price I have seen on-line, it seems that would be expensive.

    So, how would you lanolize a wool blanket?

  2. #52
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Jersey Shore, NJ
    Hammock
    BIAS Hiker Lite
    Tarp
    HG Winter Palace
    Insulation
    HG!
    Suspension
    Whoopie/Dutchbling
    Posts
    5,046
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by TiredFeet View Post
    Curious - how do you lanolize a wool blanket?

    I have some pure lanolin and as a paste it is very thick and very, very sticky. I know lanolin can be obtained in the form of oil, but at the price I have seen on-line, it seems that would be expensive.

    So, how would you lanolize a wool blanket?
    From the research I have done, you add a small amount of 100% lanolin (mere drops, I've read) to hot water, along with a detergent suitable for wool. Mix it up and slosh it around, then drain, rinse, and lay the wool out to dry (no dryer unless you WANT shrinkage).

    Supposedly, lanolinizing will even help restore wool items that have accidentally shrunk. The lanolin loosens the fibers so that you can stretch it back close to it original shape.

    I think the paste would work, but 100% pure lanolin oil didn't look all that expensive to me. A four oz. bottle is only $14.50 at this URL:

    http://hyenacart.com/stores/EweNeedI...p?c=78&p=27755

  3. #53

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Hammock
    Hennesy
    Tarp
    various
    Insulation
    pads, foam
    Posts
    3,894
    Images
    17
    it seems to me that when you introduce fog or dew silnylon or some other impervious barrier has a place in the outer layer. Some places you need the cover to breath but others you gain more moisture from the outside than you make inside. I'd be tempted to use a bathtub underneath over the end caps and breathable over the top. In use I'd vent over the face area as most of the lost moisture is in the breath. OTOH it's also a lot of heat. If you can capture that under the tarp it sets up another microclimate that might help with the fog on top. Of course if you stay below freezing then fog and dew are not a problem. Lot's to theorize about. ;-)

  4. #54
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Jersey Shore, NJ
    Hammock
    BIAS Hiker Lite
    Tarp
    HG Winter Palace
    Insulation
    HG!
    Suspension
    Whoopie/Dutchbling
    Posts
    5,046
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by nothermark View Post
    In use I'd vent over the face area as most of the lost moisture is in the breath. OTOH it's also a lot of heat. If you can capture that under the tarp it sets up another microclimate that might help with the fog on top. Of course if you stay below freezing then fog and dew are not a problem. Lot's to theorize about. ;-)
    Yes, lots to theorize about. Some have poo-poo'd my wool undercover/overcover idea, but I like your thinking that breathable on top is more important than breathable on bottom (though the undercover should breathe too). There are all sorts of approaches to this, which makes it fun!

    Some folks hate vapor barriers as insulation, but I'm probably going to try it. And some folks have written off wool and Tyvek, but I'm probably going to try them too in various applications. Hang your own hang!

  5. #55
    Señor Member wisenber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Hammock
    Speer,DIY,GT
    Tarp
    Gargoyle Custom
    Insulation
    HG,JRB,Leigh,Speer
    Suspension
    disbelief
    Posts
    2,189
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by SilvrSurfr View Post
    Yes, lots to theorize about. Some have poo-poo'd my wool undercover/overcover idea, but I like your thinking that breathable on top is more important than breathable on bottom (though the undercover should breathe too). There are all sorts of approaches to this, which makes it fun!

    Some folks hate vapor barriers as insulation, but I'm probably going to try it. And some folks have written off wool and Tyvek, but I'm probably going to try them too in various applications. Hang your own hang!
    Lanolized wool is not a vapor barrier. It is water resistant but vapor permeable. That would block rain and mist, but the vapor of fog would still pass through. The lanolized fiber will not absorb moisture, but the gaps between the fiber will resulting in a pretty big weight gain. Since the condense moisture is not actually in the fiber, it "should" be able to have the moisture removed by shaking it out.

    Tyvek will work and has already been used as such. It's just less breathable than DriDucks.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •