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  1. #11
    MacEntyre's Avatar
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    3 layers of Insultex in an UnderQuilt constructed using a differential cut will get most people to 40*F, some (including me and Thing1) to freezing. InsulTubes help (learn more with HF search). It is the easiest, lightest, cheapest way to insulate a hammock above freezing.

    I don't recommend using Insultex as your primary insulation below freezing because it is a vapor barrier, and because the amount of Insultex required takes it beyond the realm of practicality. If you use it to supplement down below freezing, be sure it is between the hammock and the down.

    Below freezing, I switch to natural fibers and down.

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  2. #12
    Senior Member TinaLouise's Avatar
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    I made a 3 layer IX UQ and after testing it, found that it works very well for me for spring/summer/early fall temps. I'm a cold sleeper and for me the 3 layer IX works in temps from about 75 down to 55. I've also used it during winter as an extra cover over my winter down under quilt. My IX quilt is waterproof and the extra cover protects my down in nasty weather. This was only for car camping type trips where the extra weight didn't matter. I have used it with thinner under quilts to raise the temperture. It worked very well for that too.

  3. #13
    Member bluefields181's Avatar
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    so What you're saying is an IX underquilt would be about if not slightly better than a poncho liner? As far as temp ratings? Anything colder than fall/spring and we're talking doublimg up with some other form of dead air catcher (down or synthetic)

  4. #14
    Senior Member SGT Rock's Avatar
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    In my experience the poncho liner would be better.
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  5. #15
    Senior Member SteelerNation's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TinaLouise View Post
    I made a 3 layer IX UQ and after testing it, found that it works very well for me for spring/summer/early fall temps. I'm a cold sleeper and for me the 3 layer IX works in temps from about 75 down to 55. I've also used it during winter as an extra cover over my winter down under quilt. My IX quilt is waterproof and the extra cover protects my down in nasty weather. This was only for car camping type trips where the extra weight didn't matter. I have used it with thinner under quilts to raise the temperture. It worked very well for that too.
    I've found the same temperature range for my IX TQ/UQ combination. I have also planned to use my IX UQ in addition to my JRB Down UQ for temps below 20 to augment. Not sure if I will do that now, based on the Vapor Barrier discussion, but I would certainly be cautious about putting it outside my down, as that might trap moisture in the down itself.

    Again, no practical experience, but based on what I read, a concern. Curious to see if you've seen any sign of that.

    SN
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  6. #16
    MacEntyre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluefields181 View Post
    so What you're saying is an IX underquilt would be about if not slightly better than a poncho liner?
    Wiggys poncho liners are filled with Lamilite, which is much heavier. That's the big advantage of Insultex, not low temp ratings.
    Quote Originally Posted by SGT Rock View Post
    In my experience the poncho liner would be better.
    I believe you were one of the first of the folks on the small size who had trouble filling up the IX UQs. I, of course, never had that problem, being 50% heavier than you, Sarge! We make them now with end channels to help close the gaps. Even so, not everyone can get into the low 40s.
    Quote Originally Posted by SteelerNation View Post
    ...I would certainly be cautious about putting it outside my down, as that might trap moisture in the down itself.
    Just want to reiterate that point. IX can be dried easily... not so with down.

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  7. #17
    Senior Member injun51's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluefields181 View Post
    so What you're saying is an IX underquilt would be about if not slightly better than a poncho liner? As far as temp ratings? Anything colder than fall/spring and we're talking doublimg up with some other form of dead air catcher (down or synthetic)
    Use a double poncho underquilt. I modded one of my liners and can double them up, or even triple or quadruple them easily by tieing them together with the strings on the side. I lay the extras inside of the modded liner and cinch it down.
    The modded liner has 2 pieces of shock cord running through the outside grosgrain on the long sides. One on each side. Then on the short sides, run 550 cord through the grosgrain using the same holes you used for the long sides. Now attach a cord lock on each side (you'll need 4. 2 for the head end and 2 for the foot end) These will be used to close up each end to eliminate air gaps.
    This system was cheap, light, packable, adjustable and most importantly WARM !!!!

  8. #18
    Senior Member TinaLouise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteelerNation View Post
    I've found the same temperature range for my IX TQ/UQ combination. I have also planned to use my IX UQ in addition to my JRB Down UQ for temps below 20 to augment. Not sure if I will do that now, based on the Vapor Barrier discussion, but I would certainly be cautious about putting it outside my down, as that might trap moisture in the down itself.

    Again, no practical experience, but based on what I read, a concern. Curious to see if you've seen any sign of that.

    SN
    I did use my IX last winter in temps down to about 17, humid, rainy. I had it on the outside with my down under quilt next to me. Worked fine and kept my down dry. The next night I rearrainged the quilts and put the down outside with the IX next to my hammock. I found it to be warmer. But if it's raining, I'll always put the IX on the outside to protect my down. I just have to adjust the suspension so that it doesn't compress the down. I've not had any issues with dampness or the IX acting like a vapor barrier. Of course there could have been moisture being trapped in the down, I just couldn't tell it.

    For what I use the IX for, it works very well. For the temps that I've tested it to work for me, I will trust it to work. And considering that I camp a lot in humid conditions during spring/summer/ early fall, the IX's properties of being waterproof is great. I used to use a very thin down UQ during these trips but I've found that the IX is a whole lot less worry for me than the down that I had to keep dry.

  9. #19
    canoebie's Avatar
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    I use 2 layers IX for three seasons, gets me down to about 40 easily as an UQ. I then use a three season Phoenix to get me down to about 10-15 degrees, a mat or some warm window between layers in the hammock for lower than that.

    IX is a great supplement, I have had no condensation issues with it as an UQ. I also use 2 layers of IX as a cover or a sock when it is below 0 with it slightly vented, works great. I think IX is not an end all, but used with some common sense and as a supplement it really has a place in my gear.

    I have used the above combinations with a down sleeping bag to 14 below. That is my personal record. Twas mighty chilly that night. Heard the trees pop as the wood expanded from freezing.
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  10. #20
    RootCause's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacEntyre View Post
    3 layers of Insultex in an UnderQuilt constructed using a differential cut will get most people to 40*F, some (including me and Thing1) to freezing. InsulTubes help (learn more with HF search). It is the easiest, lightest, cheapest way to insulate a hammock above freezing.

    I don't recommend using Insultex as your primary insulation below freezing <snip>
    Hey Mac,

    I'm trying to reconcile the differences in your statements in this thread, and TeeDee's reported experience here: TeeDee IX TQ & UQ thread.

    What do you think might account for the differences in perceived temperature ratings for IX? This isn't like a little bitty difference, it's the difference between a nice 40* quilt and a 10* quilt- that's a huge swing!

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