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  1. #11
    Whoooo Buddy)))) Shug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jsaults View Post
    I was going to fabricate a condensation shield similar to Shugs, but I just had an epiphany:

    Take one old wicking T-shirt (or a really cheap one from China Mart). Cut from the hem, up each side (along the underarm seams) to the shoulders. Cut around the front of the arms, across the shoulders, in back of the knit collar hole. Discard the back, or use it as a hankie.

    What you should have left is a knit neck hole and the front of the shirt. Through the hem of the shirt slide a section of 1/8" polypropylene tube - the stiff but flexy stuff. Melt a small hole in the center of the hem for a light shock cord to pass through and tie to the poly tubing.

    Stick your head through the neck hole. Attach the shock cord to the interior ridgeline and adjust as needed. The tube acts as a batten to give the device some shape to reduce the humid exhaled air from condensing on your TQ.

    Yes, I know. Pictures would have been better. I will post some when I construct it.

    Jim

    frost-bib
    Whoooo Buddy)))) I Love Onions, Grits, Greens, Livermush, NC Style BBQ, Potted Meat, Anchovies, 'Naner Puddin", Peanut Butter Pie, Red Velvet Cake and Cocoa and Straaaaaawwwwberrrry Milk and Coffee Crisps....
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  2. #12
    2new2hang's Avatar
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    I really like the idea of the frost bib, but ther is a theme that keeps running through my mind every time I think about having one. Seems I get a bit squirmy whilst sleeping in the hammock, and have only two major phobias, the first of which is heights (love the idea of hanging no higher than I'm willing to fall, which ain't far, I can promise), and the second is choking. Shug, you must be a solid back sleeper to keep that bib sitting where it belongs. Me, I think of my neck strung up in that bib, and have immediate visions of this...
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by 2new2hang; 01-02-2012 at 17:56.
    2new2hang

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  3. #13
    Whoooo Buddy)))) Shug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2new2hang View Post
    I really like the idea of the frost bib, but ther is a theme that keeps running through my mind every time I think about having one. Seems I get a bit squirmy whilst sleeping in the hammock, and have only two major phobias, the first of which is heights (love the idea of hanging no higher than I'm willing to fall, which ain't far, I can promise), and the second is choking. Shug, you must be a solid back sleeper to keep that bib sitting where it belongs. Me, I think of my neck strung up in that bib, and have immediate visions of this...

    uploadfromtaptalk1325547687846.jpg
    I am very still sleeper...like a mummy. But the head whole is relly big and cut to near the edges just in case.
    I really made it for me and never expected anyone else to want to use one but I want that frost off of my down especially if I were out for a longer winter trip.
    Whoooo Buddy)))) I Love Onions, Grits, Greens, Livermush, NC Style BBQ, Potted Meat, Anchovies, 'Naner Puddin", Peanut Butter Pie, Red Velvet Cake and Cocoa and Straaaaaawwwwberrrry Milk and Coffee Crisps....
    I Hope Heaven has a Bakery!!!!



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  4. #14
    Señor Member wisenber's Avatar
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    First, let me say that I have a serious case of tarp/stove envy! That is awesome. Speaking of the stove, I have on question and one comment. Did you cook on the stove with the tarp sealed up and maybe make a brew or two? If so, THAT might be where some of the moisture was generated beyond what you put out yourself. As to the heat from the stove, have you considered putting a couple of large stones on the stove when your finished cooking? The stones should absorb heat and release the heat hours after the stove has gone out. That might buy you some more hating time without any more fuel.

    I'm with slow on the iced tea analogy. Shug has some good advice with starting out with fewer layers, and the VB clothing suggestion will help a lot also.

  5. #15
    2new2hang's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shug View Post
    I am very still sleeper...like a mummy. But the head whole is relly big and cut to near the edges just in case.
    I really made it for me and never expected anyone else to want to use one but I want that frost off of my down especially if I were out for a longer winter trip.
    I think it's a great idea, and for me, with some shock cord, and as you say, a larger cut opening, it would work out great. I was amazed at the amount of moisture (read, water) that accumulated on the top of my TQ. Actually, what woke me up was a couple of drops of water on my face.
    Luckily, I had a small "super towel" to wipe off the weather shield above me. The bug netting beneath the WS on the Clark, seemed to help retain some of the moisture between it and the weather shield above it. It was still pretty warm (relatively) inside the Clark compared to the outside. There is an amazing temperature difference. As Mac had mentioned earlier, as had a couple of the others, ventilation seems to be a huge factor. The trick would seem to me to be to ventilate without having a large dispersal of heat, thus defeating the whole concept of the weather shield.
    I had planned on taking my XL Papa Smurf Roaming Gnome and Mollymac Sock, but that baby is too long inside of the Smokehouse tarp, so it sticks out on the ends. Next go-around, I'll forgoe the stove and Smokehouse and take my DDhammocks 14 foot tarp. I won't have the enclosed and heated hotel like I do with the Smokehouse, so I assume it will completely change the scenario as far as warmth/cold condensation.
    I recall reading somewhere that we exhale as much as 1/2 liter of water a day. I also recall that human breath has 100% humidity due to the passage of the air over the moist surfaces of the lung and throat. I can see how it's possible to wet down my quilt by simply breathing and having it condensate inside the enclosed environment of my hammock setup.
    2new2hang

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  6. #16
    MacEntyre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2new2hang View Post
    I had planned on taking my XL Papa Smurf Roaming Gnome and Mollymac Sock, but that baby is too long inside of the Smokehouse tarp, so it sticks out on the ends.
    That is one way to ventilate.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2new2hang View Post
    I recall reading somewhere that we exhale as much as 1/2 liter of water a day.
    It's about a cup, a pint, a half liter... depending on what you read.
    "We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately." - Ben Franklin
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  7. #17
    2new2hang's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wisenber View Post
    First, let me say that I have a serious case of tarp/stove envy! That is awesome. Speaking of the stove, I have on question and one comment. Did you cook on the stove with the tarp sealed up and maybe make a brew or two? If so, THAT might be where some of the moisture was generated beyond what you put out yourself. As to the heat from the stove, have you considered putting a couple of large stones on the stove when your finished cooking? The stones should absorb heat and release the heat hours after the stove has gone out. That might buy you some more hating time without any more fuel.

    I'm with slow on the iced tea analogy. Shug has some good advice with starting out with fewer layers, and the VB clothing suggestion will help a lot also.
    Hi Wisenber,
    Thanks for your post. I did not do any cooking in the evening prior to hitting the sack. However, being inside the enclosed tarp, with the stove belting out heat, there must be a corelation between the heating of the stove and also not only the relative humidity of the surrounding air, but also the fact that the stove is sitting on tiny legs directly above the deeply snow covered ground. When I woke up the next morning, the stove had sunk over a foot in the snow. This was after I had packed it down to make a base layer so I could set up the tarp on a flat, hard surface. I think some folks use a snow pan, or something of that nature to keep the stove from sinking. Lesson learned for next time. I learned several lessons on this trip, that was only one of them. The other big one that comes to mind is that a drop cloth tarp on the ground, laying on the snow to protect my feet and gear from getting dirt in the hammock, becomes a flying carpet once the snow under it becomes good and packed. I also learned that once that snow is packed down and a slightly warmed air source is introduced, you get to experience being Gordie Howe every time you enter under the tarp. Had a "feet up over my head, shooting throught the air" moment when entering the tarp one time. I'll need some sort of cleats or something on my boots to keep that from happening again.
    The rocks would be a good idea, but lugging them would be a bit of a pain. The other issue is that the stove is titanium, very small ( 6"x 7"x 10" fire box, 11" tall when assembled), so larger rocks big enough to hold the heat could be problematic. Lugging them would also be a bit of a pain as there are none availalbe up where I hang. I may kick that idea around a bit though, I appreciate it. I did try heating with coal instead of wood (the Japanese grill with real wood coal instead of pressed brickettes). That gave me considerably more burn time, but again, you'd have to carry it in.
    Speaking of carrying, being a Noob, I ended up toting so much more stuff (I didn't weigh it, but I can still hear the sobs from my poor ULA pack) in order to fend off the cold. I was sure, being alone, I would get up there and freeze to death like a fat popsicle. Shug's suggestion about wearing less gear to bed is duly noted. That is also on my list of "lessons learned" for next time. I also found that I didn't use/need most of the additional gear I brought with me. Everytime I go out, I swear I'll take less than the last time. I think since starting out hiking, I must have had a pickup load of stuff, and now only carry about station wagon full I'm still learning. I don't see myself ever being one of those guys with a children's school backpack filled with foil and plastic cups for cooking and plastic wrap for a shelter, but I'm working on it.
    2new2hang

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  8. #18
    2new2hang's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=MacEntyre;623316]That is one way to ventilate.

    LOL!!!
    2new2hang

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  9. #19
    MacEntyre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2new2hang View Post
    ...the stove is sitting on tiny legs directly above the deeply snow covered ground.
    That's yer source of all the water!

    You need a floor in that hut...

    - MacEntyre
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  10. #20
    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacEntyre View Post
    That's yer source of all the water!

    You need a floor in that hut...

    - MacEntyre
    +1! Something insulated...hrm...maybe packed forest duff or pine boughs under a thin nylon or canvas tarp? I dunno.

    I remember a story I read years ago about how some of the huts in Siberia that got gas heaters for the first time under the Soviets wound up melting a foot or two down into the permafrost during winter. Not a fun time, for certain...

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