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  1. #1

    Polyester Webbing Min Width?

    Looking to switch to a quick and easy suspension and decided on just getting a strap, looped on one end for tree, then go through rings on the hammock end. No knots (unless you count the choker around tree), no hardware other than the rings.

    My question: Could I go as thin as 3/8" or 1/2" webbing? Found this with a break strength of 1500lbs. Even with the strain calculated @ a 75 angle (much higher than usual) this is more than double what I would require. However, most people I'm seeing on here are using and recommending around 1"

    Is there something I'm missing as far as strength goes? or is there a reason other than strength that webbing should be up to 1 in. ?

  2. #2
    Bubba's Avatar
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    It's not about the strength but about providing a wider surface so as not to damage the tree. Lots of discussions on here over the merits of this practice. Its not 100% proven but beyond being better for the trees its also about perception of park rangers and similar people. As a community its good to show we are respectful of the trees.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  3. #3
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    Agreed...anything < 1inch is likely to damage the trees (in my opinion)...or give the impression that it COULD damage the trees to rangers and such who are concerned about that happening.

    Usually it's preferable to go with the wider webbing if you can, even if you personally don't feel it matters. It gives others a better view of hammock camping in general.

  4. #4
    I thought that may be the case. I was just thinking if I were making the webbing my entire length anything I could shave off would pay off big.

  5. #5
    MAD777's Avatar
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    I use 1" wide webbing. I believe that is enough to spread the pressure out on the tree and look good enough for Rangers and other passer-by to see that I'm making an effort to protect the forest.

    I shaved off weight by using only 5' of webbing on each end of the hammock and 6' whoopie slings for the adjustable part of the suspension. I also carry a 4' piece of Amsteel with loops on each end in case I need the extra length.
    Mike
    "Life is a Project!"

  6. #6
    Thanks, Mad777. I've just been entertaining different ideas to come up with something simpler than the whoopie+toggle+strap "standard". Whoopies are great but sometimes more difficult to adjust than anticipated and it seems like where I go- dealing with short spans is more the norm than longer ones.

    When I found the 3/8" straps it really made the "all-strap-method" more appealing in terms of weight and volume because I always assumed you needed a 1" or 2" strap until I saw the break strengths.

    However, I have read here that some have combated the short span problem with things like links of amsteel brummels coming off their hammock and toggling right to them when needed.

    I'm sure there is some combination of convenience and weight I can find that makes me happy. I dont really agree completely with the paradox of choice but after browsing the boards I can see where its proponents are coming from! LOL

  7. #7
    MAD777's Avatar
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    I have chain links of Amsteel double larks headed around the hammock knot. My whoopies are attached to the chain links with Dutch biners. If I have a short distance, I simply bypass the whoopies and connect the tree strap to the Dutch biner.

    Another benefit is that I can completely remove my suspension at the Dutch biner and store that separately if the straps get wet or coated with pine sap.
    Mike
    "Life is a Project!"

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