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    Silnylon tarp set up and maintenance questions?

    Given high wind exposure how would you set up your tarp. Outside of setting the tarp windward edge low to the ground. Would it be better to use lines with tensioner (the surgical rubber/sling shot tube type)? Does it make sense to "open" up a bit of the leeward side to prevent or reduce uplifting of the tarp?

    Do you need to or should you reseal the seams of your silnylon tarp every season? Based on the thread about Permatex or the spray Silicone Water Guard as an alternate to Silnet it doesn't sound like much effort is required to apply the spray or Permatex. But if not necessary no point in resealing.

  2. #2
    slowhike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by koaloha05 View Post
    Given high wind exposure how would you set up your tarp. Outside of setting the tarp windward edge low to the ground. Would it be better to use lines with tensioner (the surgical rubber/sling shot tube type)? Does it make sense to "open" up a bit of the leeward side to prevent or reduce uplifting of the tarp?

    Do you need to or should you reseal the seams of your silnylon tarp every season? Based on the thread about Permatex or the spray Silicone Water Guard as an alternate to Silnet it doesn't sound like much effort is required to apply the spray or Permatex. But if not necessary no point in resealing.
    Personally, I would most of the time try to find a spot w/ some protection against direct, strong wind, but there have been several times that for one reason or another I found myself camping in more wind than I had hoped for.

    I think the tensioners do help absorb some of the force of wind gusts, but only to a point.
    And they need to be made in such a way that after they stretch only so far, the guy line it's self comes into play.

    An additional help is using something to weight the guy lines, like large rocks or limbs.
    The weight will act as a shock absorber too.


    And if it's really bad, I would do what you mentioned & stake the tarp edge near the ground.
    Last edited by slowhike; 05-30-2008 at 22:55.
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